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Catalyst Biodiesel - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 19 November 2022

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RSM process optimization of biodiesel production from rapeseed oil and waste corn oil in the presence of green and novel catalyst.

Organobase immobilized heterogeneous catalysis production has emerged as the most favored route for biodiesel production due to several drawbacks of homogeneous catalysis, organobase immobilized heterogeneous catalysis has emerged as the most popular route. Magnerite nanocatalyst with high surface area magnetic nanocatalyst with a modified design and synthesis of Peganum harmala spice seed extract as an organobase functionalized high surface area magnetic nanocatalyst. In the process of precursor salt reduction in order to synthesize CuFe 2 O 4 NPs, Pistachio leaves were used. The optimal conditions for biodiesel production were determined by response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken's design, which included the investigation of calibration curves and 3D contour plots.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36385114


Production of Biodiesel From Phyllanthus emblica Seeds Using Activated Charcoal as Heterogenous Catalyst

Biodiesel is not only renewable, but it also contributes to the climate by reducing green gas emission reduction. But using edible crops as a source for biofuel production can result in food security issues. Using different extraction techniques, oil extraction was enhanced. Activated charcoal was made and tested with FTIR and SEM to determine the morphology of the activated charcoal. DMC to oil molar ratio of 2:1, 4:1, 6:1, 8:1 and 1. 5, 2 and 2. 5 wt% were carried out in order to determine the correct reaction conditions.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR569143


Towards biodiesel sustainability: Waste sweet potato leaves as a green heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production using microalgal oil and waste cooking oil

Biodiesel production from inexpensive and readily available feedstocks using agriculture waste as catalysts is the company's success strategy in making biodiesel more competitive. Hence, a green heterogeneous catalyst derived from the waste sweet potato leaves was synthesized and used for biodiesel production using Scenedesmus obliquus oil and waste soybean cooking oil, according to a new report.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607874708


Solvent-free synthesis and characterization of bimetallic UiO-66(Zr/Sn) heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production

UiO-66 has been shown to be a highly effective heterogeneous catalyst in the esterification of oleic acid and methanol for biodiesel production. For the construction of UiO-66's multi-functional sites, it is a challenge to achieve a direct synthesis of UiO-66 with additional metal centers. The results reveal that UiO-66-green with bimetal centers exhibits superior catalytic activity in the esterification of oleic acid. In addition, the effect of tin integration on the fabric and reactivity of UiO-66's permeability process at room temperature can be seen.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR557742


Production of biodiesel from non-edible feedstocks using environment friendly nano-magnetic Fe/SnO catalyst.

The quest for a new environment friendly heterogeneous catalyst has been prompted by environmental issues related with chemical catalysts' ability to satisfy an ever-increasing energy demand. If a catalyst being used in biodiesel production is not environmentally friendly, the atmosphere is being polluted in another way, while still avoiding pollution caused by fossil fuel burning. Pongamia pinnata, Carthamus oxyacantha, Citrullus colocynthis, Sinapis arvensis, and Ricinus communis are among the products studied in this report. The present research reveals the use of nano-magnetic catalyst Fe/SnO on feldspar for the transesterification of various non-edible feedstocks oil, including Pongamia pinnata, Pongam Under optimal conditions, the biodiesel yield was found to be more than 97% for all the tested feedstocks, with a maximum biodiesel yield of 98. 1 u00b1 0. 6% obtained for bitter apple seed oil under optimum conditions.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36202925


A promising nanostructured bimetallic catalyst for the production of second-generation biodiesel: reuse and stability study.

As lipid raw materials, Soybean oil, waste frying oil, and Jatropha hieronymi oil were used. With soybean oil and waste frying oil, the minimum FAME content required by the EN 14214 standard was met in 3 h under optimized reaction conditions. The produced biofuel's key quality characteristics were investigated and determined to meet international requirements for its commercialization as automotive diesel fuel without further treatment.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36121753


Kinetic studies on the extraction of oil from a new feedstock (Chukrasia tabularis L. seed) for biodiesel production using a heterogeneous catalyst.

This report has identified Chukrasia tabularis L. seed for the production of biodiesel. Pretreatment by AUH with solvent n-hexane produced a maximum oil yield of 32 wt%. To produce biodiesel economically, the physiochemical properties of the oil were determined from which it was determined that C. tabularis oil has high free fatty acid content, requiring a single-step esterification reaction to produce biodiesel. The modified aryl diazonium salt reduction process was used to synthesize a heterogeneous acid catalyst from activated carbon precursors and was used to catalyze biodiesel reaction. To obtain a maximum biodiesel conversion of 98. 5% at 6 wt% catalyst loading, 15:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, 120 min reaction time, 70 °C reaction temperature, and a 500 rpm stirring rate were all investigated, according to the following parameters that influence the biodiesel conversion.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36151438


Membrane reactor based synthesis of biodiesel from Toona ciliata seed oil using barium oxide nano catalyst.

Therefore, in our latest research, membrane technology was used to synthesize biodiesel from Toona ciliate novel and non-edible seed oil. In fact, we planned to investigate the effects of green synthesized barium oxide nanoparticles on one step of biodiesel production using membrane technology, as well as the analysis of prepared catalysts by innovative technologies. Optimal yield of biodiesel was 94% at 90° C for 150 min, with a molar ratio of 9:1 and a quantity of about 0. 39 wt % at 90 degrees. A quantitative analysis of synthesized Toona ciliata oil biodiesel was carried out by advance techniques of Gas chromatography mass spectrometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, and Nuclear magnetic resonance, which allow for the synthesis of fatty acid methyl ester compounds using oil from Toona ciliata seeds. It has been argued subsequently that membrane technology is a more cost-effective and effective method for mass-production of biodiesel using a green nano catalyst of barium oxide.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36122747


Development of a Reusable CaO/Fe3O4 Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production

Ball milling for 3 hours mixed Fe3O4 for 3 hours, followed by annealing at different temperatures for 2 hours to produce a magnetic catalyst. The catalysts characterization obtained from the X-ray diffraction and Raman results showed that the increasing annealing temperature aided the oxidation of Fe3O4 to maghemite phase. Under optimal circumstances of 65 degrees C, methanol/oil molar ratio of 12:1, 4 wt. % catalyst loading, and 95. 5% biodiesel yield can be achieved under 120 minutes reaction time, with optimum conditions of 65 oC, methanol/oil molar ratio of 12:1, 4 wt. % catalyst loading, and 95. 5% biodiesel yield under ideal conditions of 65 oC, 4 wt. % catalyst loading, 95 percent biodiesel yields.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR544340


“Waste utilization and Biodiesel production from Desmodesmus maximus grown in swine wastewater using waste eggshells as a catalyst”.

Desmodesmus maximus maximus, a potential candidate for algal biofuel production, is a potential candidate for algal biofuel production. After growing Desmodesmus maximus in four different forms of waste water, it was discovered that swine wastewater collected by the Swine Research Centre of Oklahoma state university was the best media for increasing Desmodesmus maximus for a period of ten days, owing to the increased biomass yield and lipid content in the algal biomass. The increased growth rate of algal strain grown in swine waste water was found to be 0. 88 percentu00b5/d, doubling time Tu2082 of 1. 3 hours, which shows the highest amount of algal biomass. The physicochemical characteristics of wastewater were investigated, and it was discovered that swine waste contained all the essential macro and micronutrients required for optimal growth of this microalgae. Desmodesmus maximus grown in swine wastewater yields a high quality and quantity of biodiesel, according to the study.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607946102

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions