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Cat-Scratch Disease - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 September 2022

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Thoracic osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation due to cat scratch disease: case report

A variety of clinical disorders can be described, including those involving osteomyelitis and epidural absces, but only 4 other cases have been reported in the literature. In a patient with a biopsy-proven pathogen of cat scratch disease, the authors describe a rare case of multifocal thoracic osteomyelitis with an epidural absces. Based on a percutaneous image-guided vertebral biopsy, B. henselae was found by a polymerase chain reaction study, and she was treated conservatively with doxycycline and rifampin with positive clinical results.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.7.peds1677


Cat-scratch disease, ¿does it always present with lymphadenopathy?: A case report

Diagnosing CSD can be daunting, so a definitive conclusion can only be reached with clinical suspicion and an extensive medical investigation. We present a patient with a long febrile syndrome with systemic signs and reticuloendothelial compromise herein.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.22354/24223794.1096


Osteomyelitis in Cat-Scratch Disease: A Never-Ending Dilemma—A Case Report and Literature Review

We performed a review of published case reports on osteomyelitis related to cat-scratch disease to consolidate current evidence on clinical presentation, diagnosis, and results, as well as presenting a case of disseminated cat-scratch disease in a 12-year-old female with skull osteomyelitis and spleen involvement. In 64. 7% of patients, Lymphadenopathy was present in 66. 7 percent of cases. About 12. 5% of patients did not receive any medical attention. Overall, most patients had excellent prognosis, with many patients not receiving any drugs achieving complete recovery and no symptoms recurrence. In a differential diagnosis of localized lymphadentitis, Bartonella henselae should be considered. Osteoarticular pain or weakness in children with cat-scratch disease should never be investigated for bone loss. Serology is the gold standard diagnostic tool, and MRI is the most common radiographic method to determine bone and surrounding tissue involvement.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1679306


Cat Scratch Disease

Chapter 94 discusses cat scratch disease, which is a gram-negative intracellular Bacillus infection that causes granulomatous inflammation of the tissues. There is often a history of cats, and cat scratch, bite, or licking has been present. Ostelitis and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy may develop in immunocompromised patients, severe systemic disease, or other atypical manifestations can develop, including osteomyelitis and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190938178.003.0094


Other bacterial diseasesCat-scratch disease

Cat-scratch disease is a worldwide zoonoses caused by an infection with the bacterium Bartonella henselae. The major reservoir for B. henselae is Cats, and transmission is by Ctniocephalides felis. CSD is a self-limiting disease that often begins with a small papule developing at the site of cat scratch or bite within 3-14 days of the infection. The enlarged lymph nodes will appear in up to seven weeks, and people will not recall any cat scratch or bite. About 5-10% of patients may have other forms of CSD, including eye infection, swollen lymph nodes, skin, liver, and spleen enlargement, and more rarely encephalitis. Patients of immunosuppressed patients may have more frequent diseases such as bacillary angiomatosis. Cat scratches and bites should be washed immediately with water and soap, and cats should not be allowed to lick open wounds.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198570028.003.0024


Cat-Scratch Disease

Since its first appearance in 1931, cat-scratch disease has been increasing in incidence. Once nonspecific viral diseases and cutaneous infections were excluded, it has now been recognized as being so common that it probably represents the most common cause of unilateral lymphadenopathy in children. Forty-four children, the most critically ill part of the disease spectrum, were hospitalized at Texas Children's Hospital from 1972 to 1984, forming the data base for this study. For nearly a month before admission, most patients were symptomatic, with low-grade fever and regional lymphadenopathy. The axilla and the neck are two of lymph node involvement's most common sites of lymph node involvement. Since cat-scratch disease is harmless, surgery should be reserved for severe cases of significant suppuration.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/019459988609400516


Autoimmune Thyroiditis Induced by Bartonella henselae (Cat-Scratch Disease) Might Be Reversible

Introduction: Bartonella henselae infection contributes to cat-scratch disease outbreak in patients, but it can also cause autoimmune thyroiditis. Case Presentation: We'll describe a 4-year-old boy with a severe fever of unknown origins, disseminated neck lymphadenopathy, and a headache. Both anti-thyroid antibodies were negative two months later, two months later, the thyroid was not palpable, normal on ultrasound, and both anti-thyroid antibodies were negative. This is the first study that AIT triggered by B. If the pathogenetic factor is removed at an early stage of disease, qunitana could be reversible.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1159/000525399


A clinical case of the development of a rare manifestation of cat scratch disease

Cat scratch disease is a common infectious disease caused by intracellular microorganisms Bartonella henselae, which are prevalent in wild and domestic animals. The aim of the study was to establish a rare clinical case of chorioretinitis against the background of a 10-year-old boy's bartonellosis. A 10-year-old boy was sent with letters relating to a significant reduction of vision and a reduction of the left eyelid. With an increase in temperature to 37. 5 °C and abdominal pain, the disease began. The upper eyelid was reduced when the left eye's acuity was reduced to 0. 0 n/a. With prominance, there was a marked edema of the optic nerve disc, from OND to macular area, with prominance. Since the fourth day of therapy, positive results have been evident, but the left eye's visual acuity hasn't improved. In which he was tested for bartonellosis and identified IgG to Bartonella 1:160, the patient was discharged for subsequent hospitalization at the Federal State Budgetary Institution NMRC of Eye Diseases named after Helmholtz on the eighth day. Finishing medically: Left eye neuroretinitis is due to bartonellosis. The patient was discharged on the fourteenth day after hospitalization; the left eye was almost clear, and visual acuity was 0. 06. A rare occurrence of cat scratches disease is described in this clinical case. Any atypical manifestation of the disease can be used to exclude rickettsiosis, including bartonellosis, from the treatment.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.52420/2071-5943-2022-21-3-88-93


Bartonella Neuroretinitis Following Dog Bite: an Uncommon Case of Non- Feline Related Cat Scratch Disease and Review of Literature

Abstract Introduction: Neuroretinitis is the most common ocular Cat Scratch Disease caused by the bacterium Bartonella Henselae and is easily transmitted to humans by cat scratch or bite. Without a history of feline contact, we explore a case of Bartonella neuroretinitis with occlusive vasculitis. Case Summary: A healthy 28-year-old man was diagnosed with unilateral visual loss following a dog bite and diagnosed as bartonella neuroretinitis with occlusive vasculitis with occlusive vasculitis with ocular vasculitis, with subsequent recurrence.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-1797207/v1


Cat scratch disease and other Bartonella infections

It also mentions David Relman, who identified CSD as a small gram-negative coccobacillus that is closely related to the agents that cause trench fever, brute, and crown gall disease in plants. The chapter explores Rochalimae, Bartonella bacilliformis, and Bartonella rochae that share the ability to invade vascular endothelial cells, bone marrow erythroblasts, and mature erythrocytes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190888367.003.0125

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions