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Cartilage Tissue Engineering - Crossref

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Last Updated: 25 September 2022

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Targeting Polymeric Nanobiomaterials as a Platform for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

Articular cartilage is a connective tissue structure that is present in anatomical regions that are vital for human body mobility. Osteoarthritis is the ailment that most often affects the articular cartilage. Two fields of study, tissue engineering and the science of nanobiomaterials, can both contribute to tissue repair, which may help to restore damaged tissue. The science of nanobiomaterials focuses on the creation of various nanoscale structures that can be used as drug carriers to treat and repair damaged tissues such as articular cartilage.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2174/1381612825666190708184745


Practical Use of Quartz Crystal Microbalance Monitoring in Cartilage Tissue Engineering

This article examines the use of QCM in cartilage tissue engineering. A brief introduction of the potential uses of QCM in cartilage tissue engineering begins with a brief review of biomaterials and the current state of the art in scaffold design for cartilage tissue engineering. The material selection procedure is improved by tissue engineering in the last portion of the investigation, emphasizing the importance of surface nanotopography, the use of nanofilms, and the use of QCM as a u201cscreeningu201d technique to enhance the material selection process.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb13040159


Three-Dimensional Bioprinting for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Insights into Naturally-Derived Bioinks from Land and Marine Sources

The ability to: personalize the shape and size of scaffolds, produce sophisticated machinery, and minimize the production of wastes are the key benefits of additive manufacturing techniques such as three-dimensional bioprinting. However, there are still some issues that must be addressed before 3D bioprinting can be widely used for scaffoldsu2019 construction and their clinical translation. Naturally-derived hydrogels have drew a lot of attention throughout the scientific community, considering that, nowadays, the environmental degradation is one of the top threats worldwide, exploring naturally-derived hydrogels has attracted significant attention. In particular, the current state of art regarding environmentally friendly and natural bioinks development for CTE was investigated. Overall, this paper provides an overview of 3D bioprinting for CTE in order to lead future research into the development of more effective, customizable, eco-friendly, and innovative approaches in this field of interest.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb13030118


Engineering High-Quality Cartilage Microtissues using Hydrocortisone Functionalised Microwells

In recent years, developmentally-inspired scaffold-free cartilage tissue scaffolding systems have demonstrated a lot of promise in recent years, allowing the production of highly biomimetic tissue. The overall success of such strategies, however, hinges on the establishment of methods to promote the rapid and consistent chondrogenic differentiation of clinically relevant cell sources, such as mesenchymal stem/stromal cells within microwell arrays to biofabricate several microtissues rich in cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. We first present a simple way to produce cartilage microtissues at various scales in this paper, using novel microwell array stamps. This research also sought to find soluble factors within the microwell arrays that can support robust differentiation using heterogeneous MSC populations based on the unexpected finding that Endothelial Growth Medium increased MSC aggregation and chondrogenic capacity within the microwell arrays. Hydrocortisone was found to be the primary reason within EGM that increased MSC's chondrogenic capacity within these microwell arrays.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.09.07.507002


Advanced injectable hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering

The key benefits of injectable hydrogels for cartilage damage include: the ability of cellular matrix, good biocompatibility, and a high plasticity to adapt to irregular cartilage defect surfaces, which are among the key advantages of injectable hydrogels for cartilage injury. Inherent properties make injectable hydrogels a useful tool for cartilage tissue engineering. We'll summarize the latest advancements in cartilage repair and the future challenges for injectable hydrogels.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2022.954501

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions