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Cartilage - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 September 2022

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Engineering High-Quality Cartilage Microtissues using Hydrocortisone Functionalised Microwells

In recent years, developmentally-inspired scaffold-free designs for engineering cartilage tissues have shown a lot promise in recent years, enabling the creation of highly biomimetic tissues. The overall success of such strategies, however, comes from the establishment of strategies to facilitate the rapid and consistent differentiation of clinically relevant cell sources such as mesenchymal stem/stromal cells within microwell arrays to biofabricate numerous microtissues rich in cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. We first describe a simple way to manufacture cartilage microtissues at various scales using novel microwell array stamps in this paper. This research also sought to identify soluble factors within the microwell arrays that could support robust differentiation using heterogeneous MSC populations based on the unexpected finding that Endothelial Growth Medium increased MSC aggregation and chondrogenic capacity within the microwell arrays. Hydrocortisone was found to be the key contributor within EGM that increased the chondrogenic capacity of MSCs within these microwell arrays.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.09.07.507002


Temporal enzymatic treatment to enhance the remodelling of multiple cartilage microtissues into a structurally organised tissue

Scaffold-free tissue engineering plans seek to recapitulate key aspects of traditional developmental processes as a means of producing highly biomimetic grafts. Compared to conventional scaffold-free approaches, in which individual cells are allowed to aggregate and produce a cartilaginous graft, we first demonstrate the benefits of engineering cartilage by the fusion of multiple cartilage microtissues. In addition, we found that cABC treatment modified matrix composition, tissue phenotype, and, to a lesser extent, tissue mechanics. In conclusion, this work has shown that microtissue self-organisation is a viable method for engineering scaled-up cartilage grafts with a pre-defined geometry and near-native ECM accumulation. Importantly, we have shown that temporal enzymatic therapy during graft formation may eliminate key tissue aggregates, microtissues, or organoids.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.09.07.506986


Modelling articular cartilage: the relative motion of two adjacent poroviscoelastic layers

In this research, a homogenization based on multiple scale asymptotic analysis was used to create a macroscale representation of two poroviscoelastic layers separated by a thin layer of fluid to model relative translations of two porous to the macroscale, noting scale difference between the pore level and the macroscale. In particular, the fluid layer thickness is virtually zero at the macroscale, ensuring that the two poroviscoelastic layers are effectively in contact and their interaction is captured in the derived model under a variety of socioeconomic and physiological conditions, which includes a generalization of a viscous fluid and a porous medium at the interface between a viscous fluid and a porous medium. In addition to highlighting such cartilage mechanics, the systematic derivation of the macroscale models would allow the investigation of how nanoscale cartilage mechanics, such as the swelling pressure caused by fixed charges, manifests in cartilage mechanics at much longer lengths.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/imammb/dqac005


Simvastatin and fluvastatin attenuate trauma-induced cell death and catabolism in human cartilage

Joint injuries are known to cause pathomechanisms that may lead to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. In this regard, we investigated the effects of simvastatin and fluvastatin in a drop-tower-based human ex vivo cartilage trauma model. In a dose-dependent manner, Simvastatin and fluvastatin treatment of impacted cartilage demonstrated cell protective properties. Also, statin therapy had chondroprotective effects as shown by attenuated expression of MMP-2 and MMP-13 as well as subsequent collagen type II degradation. Despite its protective properties, simvastatin stifled collagen type II biosynthesis, which was reported during chondrogenic redifferentiation of high passage chondrocytes. However, although long-term statin administration had stifled chondrogenic transformation, the addition of simvastatin in small doses for a week had a marginally improving effect. In conclusion, our results show that simvastatin and fluvastatin are safe in terms of initial injury reduction after cartilage damage.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2022.965302


The Effect of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes on Cartilage Repair in Rabbits

Mesenchymal stem cells have demonstrated chondroprotective activity in cartilage repair. We manufactured EXOs from human bone marrow stem cells and investigated their therapeutic properties in cartilage repair in the present study. The administration of hBMSC-EXOs in primary chondrocytes dramatically raises cell viability and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, wound healing assay results showed that hBMSC-EXOs promote cell migration in primary chondrocytes. hBMSC-EXOs increased mitochondrial membrane potential, according to JC-1 staining, cell apoptosis was reduced in the presence of hBMSC-EXOs, indicating cell apoptosis was reduced in the presence of hBMSC-EXOs. Stain-T Green staining and gross view Both rabbits with articular cartilage defects, and local administration with hBMSC-EXOs facilitates cartilage repair. Overall, our results show that the hBMSC-EXOs therapy is a safe cell-free therapy for cartilage defects, and that these results are likely due to increased cell proliferation and migration in chondrocytes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/5760107


Costal cartilage fractures in blunt polytrauma patients — a prospective clinical and radiological follow-up study

Purpose: Abstract Purpose: With follow-up imaging and clinical examination, we can determine the recovery of costal cartilage fractures in patients with blunt polytrauma. Methods The study group included twenty-one patients with confirmed CCFX in trauma CT. Both patients underwent MRI, ultrasound, ultra-low-dose CT examinations, and clinical status monitoring. The photographs regarding fracture union, displacement, calcifications, and persistent edema at the fracture site were reviewed by two radiologists. Trauma registry results were used to determine injury severity and outcome. CCFX had been described as stable on imaging in 15 patients. In all of the patients, cartilage calcifications were seen on healed fracture sites. In 5 patients, the fracture dislocation had increased, and one patient had signs of a non-stable union. Four patients had persistent CCFX symptoms, according to Four patients. There was no significant difference in QoL between patients with radiologically healing and non-healed CCFX. Other non-thoracic injuries mainly contributed to the post-traumatic injury.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10140-022-02066-w


Nasal Reconstruction of a Frontonasal Dysplasia via Septal L-Strut Reconstruction Using Costal Cartilage

Objective Frontonasal dysplasia is a rare congenital disorder. We discuss our method of septal L-strut reconstruction using costal cartilage. Retrospective report from June 2008 to August 2017 from June 2008 to August 2017. Methods Under general anesthesia, 6 patients with FND underwent septal reconstruction with costal cartilage salvage via open rhinoplasty. Conclusions Although the results were not entirely satisfactory from an aesthetic standpoint, we discovered that FND can be treated via septal reconstruction with costal cartilage and that the clinical findings are reliable and satisfactory, according to the author's remarks. Our treatment is a safe alternative for FND patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/10556656211036614


Osteophytes mediate the associations between cartilage morphology and changes in knee symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis

Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to determine if cartilage deficiencies and cartilage volume changes with knee pain changes that were mediated by osteophytes. Methods The Vitamin D Effects on Osteoarthritis Study's results were analyzed as a cohort. Using linear regression models, cartilage morphology and changes in knee pain were investigated, and mediation analysis was used to see if these relationships were mediated by osteophytes. The association of cartilage defects with change in total knee pain and rise in weight-bearing pain, as well as changes in weight-bearing pain and dysfunction was mediated by tibiofemoral and patellar osteophyte, and the relationship of cartilage volume with change in weight-bearing pain and dysfunction. Both cartilage defects and cartilage volume had no direct influence on knee pain change. Conclusions The most significant correlations between cartilage morphology and knee pain shifts were indirect and partly mediated by osteophytes, with cartilage morphology and knee pain changes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-022-02905-8


Is there a relationship between sella turcica calcification and thyroid cartilage calcification? A random study using lateral cephalometric radiography

Thyroid cartilage changes begin in the second decade of life with the horn of the thyroid cartilage, and they spread throughout the person's lifetime to other cartilage plates. The present research, on the other hand, is to determine if there is a correlation between thyroid calcification and sella turcica bridging. The sella turcica sample included elements included age in the fourth decade, no craniofacial deformities, no history of craniofacial surgical intervention, good-quality lateral cephalometric radiographs, and a clear picture of the sella turcica. Thyroid cartilage calcification could be regarded as a normal component of the aging process, but STB could be present on lateral radiographs due to the anatomical structures' superimposition. We found no correlation between thyroid cartilage calcification and STB in this research, but a larger patient sample is required for determining thyroid calcification and STB determination.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.52083/aeso9994


Multiparity as a Potential Cause of the Articular Cartilage Degradation in the Knee Joint; Sonographic Evaluation in the Postmenopausal Women

Especially among postmenopausal women, pain in the knee joint is the leading cause of disability. In postmenopausal women, the aim was to establish multiparity as a potential source of femoral cartilage thinning inside the knee joint, causing pain. Patients with all other risk factors of the knee joint pain, as well as effect modifying factors, were refused admission. In the lateral, central, and medial portion of the knee joint of all patients with a p-value less than 0. 1, a strong negative relationship was found between the parity of the patient and the femoral articular cartilage thickness at the lateral, central, and medial level of the knee joint.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v27i4.4891

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions