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Carpometacarpal Joint Osteoarthritis - Crossref

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Last Updated: 19 November 2022

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Liparthroplasty for Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Osteoarthritis: A Case Series with Median 5 Years of Follow-Up

After failed conservative treatment options to postpone arthroplasty surgery of the thumb carpometacarpal joint as long as possible, liparthroplasty has recently been discussed as a promising bridging therapy. The latest study reviews the use of this therapy in seven stage II and twenty-four stage III osteoarthritis patients. Compared to the ones prior to liparthroplasty, we noticed a significant decrease in all postinterventional disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand scores, as well as pain levels. According to a binary regression study, smokers had 11 times higher risks of therapy failure, which resulted in surgical conversion. Seventeen patients out of nineteen patients in our final analysis said they were delighted with liparthroplasty. We recommend liparthroplasty as a safe bridging therapy for preserving joint integrity as long as possible, especially in non-smoking patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11216411


Arthroscopy-assisted partial trapeziectomy combined with ligament reconstruction for thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis: A different technique

Background There is no agreement on the correct surgical treatment for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. The purpose of this research was to introduce a new technique to restore the function and stability of the first carpal metacarpal joint with minimal trauma, rapid pain relief, reduced complications, and repeated follow-ups were measured and statistically analyzed. Methods This was a retrospective review of ten patients with a mean age of 51. 8 years. The first metacarpal in two patients showed slight subsidence and dislocation, but it did not affect the function by measurement. Conclusions Arthroscopy-assisted partial trapezium resection, as well as ligament reconstruction, may be a highly effective and profitable surgical procedure in patients with thumb CMC OA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2022.945013


A Meta-Analysis of the Outcomes of Ligament Reconstruction Compared to No Reconstruction with or without Tendon Interposition Following Trapeziectomy for Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Osteoarthritis

Background: The results of trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition are still uncertain, whether or in combination with tendon interposition in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb are also debated. Methods: A meta-analysis of randomised trials that included the results of patients with thumb CMCJ OA that underwent LRTI, T, or TIA with at least one year follow-up. The findings included a number of patients with pain 1 year after surgery, the Visual Analog Scale for Pain, the primary pinch strength, patient reported outcome measurements, and the number of adverse effects. In NPP, VAS pain, the primary pinch, at 1 year and 5 years or more after surgery, there were no differences between LRTI and T/TIA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1142/s2424835522500175


Efficacy of Abductor Pollicis Longus Suspension Arthroplasty Combined With Mini TightRope for Osteoarthritis of Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint

Background: With trapeziectomy combined with first and second metacarpal fixation using suture button technology, we wanted to determine the safety of abductor pollicis longus suspension arthroplasty with trapeziectomy. The research included thirteen patients who received APL suspension arthroplasty plus suture button devices for osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb at our hospital between 2015 and 2019 and were followed for more than 24 months. While grip and pinch strength did not change significantly between preoperative and final follow-up measurements, the ROM of radial and palmar abduction and the VAS score at the latest follow-up were much higher than preoperative ones, although the preoperative results were not significantly higher than preoperative norms. Conclusions: This surgical technique resulted in significant improvement in the ROM of radial and palmar abduction, as well as the VAS score for pain, and the combined fixation of the first and second metacarpals with suture button technology minimized the subsidence of the first metacarpal.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/15589447221120849


A systematic review and meta-analysis of arthroscopic assisted techniques for thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis

Arthroscopic treatment of thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthrosis is a procedure that has variable results. For ten included non-randomized cohort studies involving 294 patients, ten included non-randomized cohort studies including 294 patients were conducted. Meta-analysis of visual analogue scores for pain, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores, grip endurance, and pinch endurance were performed before and after arthroscopy was done. The use of arthroscopic-assisted techniques for thumb CMC OA is still limited, but it could be a viable option for patients with thumb CMC OA who do not respond to non-operative therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1753193418757122


Therapy management of thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: Exploring UK therapists’ perceptions of joint instability

Introduction Carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis is a common and painful condition that is associated with ligament laxity, subluxation, and joint instability. Several treatments are designed to treat the signs of instability and subluxation in patients. The objective of this research was to investigate experienced therapists' views about joint osteoarthritis joint disease in carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis and its relationship with laxity, subluxation, and strength, as well as the perceived effectiveness of exercise interventions. Instability was linked to laxity, subluxation, and disease progression, and was considered by many experts as a problem that involves the entire thumb column; clinical reasoning by stage of disease; or whether treatment should be focusing on compensating for instability.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1758998317698099


Trapeziectomy versus joint replacement for first carpometacarpal (CMC 1) joint osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Purpose: Abstract Purpose This systematic review and meta-analysis specifically compares joint replacement and trapeziectomy procedures to provide an insight into which surgical intervention is most effective for first carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. Our meta-analysis revealed that post-operative QDASH scores were lower for patients in the JR group. Additionally, JR techniques had significantly higher risks of overall infections and significantly higher chances of revision surgery. Conclusion Summary: Based on very little to moderate-quality data, JR treatments may lead to improved mobility with less pain and greater chances of requiring revision surgery; however, JR has greater odds of complications and higher odds of needing revision surgery. A more robust RCT that compares JR and TRAP with standardised outcome measures and a long-term follow-up will contribute to the overall quality of evidence.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00590-021-03070-5


Trapeziectomy with Ligament Reconstruction and Tendon Interposition versus Trapeziometacarpal Joint Replacement for Thumb Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Objectives This paper aims to compare the results of trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition in comparison to trapeziometacarpal joint replacement for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. With the joint replacement group posting higher QDASH scores than the LRTI group, our findings reveal a significant difference in the Quick Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand scores between the trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition and Joint Replacement groups. As a result of a superb Kapandji score, we found that those who had a joint replacement had a much stronger thumb defense than those in the LRTI group. Conclusions While both treatment options are valid, the existing research shows that joint replacement carries greater risks and therefore should not be used to substitute the current standard treatment of trapeziectomy with LRTI.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1731818


Outcomes of denervation, joint lavage and capsular imbrication for painful thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis

The primary aim in the treatment of thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis is pain relief. A retrospective review of a case series of patients with symptomatic thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis treated with denervation, joint lavage, and capsular imbrication was carried out. Patients who were surveyed in person showed a significant reduction in pain and a significant improvement in thumb function. The findings of our research show that the suggested therapeutic strategy may be a safe alternative to more invasive surgical options in patients with earlier stages of thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1753193416632149


Mobilisation or immobilisation-based treatments for first carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis with subgroup analyses

Introduction Both joint mobilisation and immobilization are thought to be highly advisable in the treatment of first carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis. This report is designed to determine whether or not intervention reduced pain and increased pinch strength in people with first CMCJ OA in the short term and determine whether one intervention is superior to the other. Manual therapy with or without exercise was included in manual therapy, but imobilisation strategies used thumb splinting with several different styles. According to placebo, very low-quality and low-quality reports revealed that mobilisation resulted in statistically but not clinically significant increases in pain and pinch strength, but not significantly more than placebo. No effect on pain and pinch strength was found when compared to a placebo or no intervention. Discussion Neither mobilization nor imobilization alone resulted in clinically relevant improvements in pain or pinch strength in the short run in people with symptomatic first CMCJ OAs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/17589983221083994

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions