Advanced searches left 3/3

Carpal Tunnel Symptom - Crossref

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 10 August 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Mobile Games among University Students: A symptom and functional severity for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, or chronic trapping of the median nerve on the wrist, is the most common peripheral lesion in the nerve. Patients are more likely to experience nocturnal pain, anesthesia, and admiration affecting the median nerve's innervated digits. In a Selangor public university, the questionnaires were distributed to 373 undergraduate students aged 18 to 25. CTS respondents have mild symptoms and functional severity, according to the Respondent's results. The majority of the respondents reported that they had mild symptoms of CTS, such as numbness and tingling.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21834/ebpj.v7i20.3479


Magnetic resonance imaging compared with electrodiagnostic studies in patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome: predicting symptoms, function, and surgical benefit at 1 year

Objectives in this research The aim of this study of patients with clinical carpal tunnel syndrome was to compare the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging with that of electrodiagnostic studies for the following objectives: 1 prediction of 1-year results and 2 identification of patients who are likely to benefit from surgical therapy. The individual surgeon, who had access to the initial EDS but not MR imaging findings, made the decision to treat patients conservatively or by carpal tunnel release. Patients who had undergone surgery showed greater improvement at 1 year than those who did not have surgery. The length of the abnormal T2-weighted nerve signal on MR imaging and median nerve latency differences were the biggest predictors of surgical success. MR imaging over EDSs was a common patient choice. Conclusions The results from MR imaging of the carpal tunnel suggest surgical benefit independently of nerve conduction studies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns/2008/108/3/0541


Is psychological distress associated with carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms and nerve conduction study findings? A case-control study from Syria

However, psychological factors can influence how patient perceive this pain and can cause similar pain in some situations. This research is intended to determine the correlation between symptoms severity, medical status, and nerve conduction studies of adult patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. When compared to controls, cases with CTS had significant increases anxiety and depression, but not more fear. CTS symptoms were significantly more prevalent than those with elevated anxiety, depression, and rage, as well as lower functional status. In the case study, anxiety was also elevated in cases with normal NCS. In addition, being anxious and depressed were both linked with elevated CTS symptoms in the hand. Having anger was also related to higher CTS symptoms in some instances. Even having normal NCS, these results highlight the importance of psychological aspects when experiencing hand pain or CTS signs as these patients may have these signs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-778380/v1


Structural validity of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its short version, the 6-Item CTS Symptoms Scale: A Rasch analysis one year after surgery

Abstract Background: The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its shorter version, the Six-Item Carpal Tunnel Symptoms Scale, are widely used for determining function and/or symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. This report looked at the BCTQ and CTS-6 questionnaires among patients who had undergone surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome treatment. Methods: The data for this cross-sectional analysis was obtained from 217 adult patients who had undergone carpal tunnel release surgery one year earlier. At 12 months after surgery, all patients completed the BCTQ's CTS-6, Symptom Severity Scale, and Functional Status Scale. Merging of the correct response categories resulted in ordered response category thresholds. Conclusions: Based on the RMT's review, the CTS-6 has superior psychometric results compared to the BCTQ SSS in surgically treated patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-36216/v2


Structural Validity of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its Short Version the 6-Item CTS Symptoms Scale: A Rasch Analysis One Year After Surgery

Abstract Background: The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its shorter version, Six-Item Carpal Tunnel Symptoms Scale, are widely used for evaluating function and/or symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The present research looked at the structural integrity of the BCTQ and CTS-6 in patients who had undergone surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome treatment. Methods: The information was obtained from 217 adult patients who had undergone carpal tunnel placement one year earlier. The BCTQ's CTS-6, Symptom Severity Scale, and Functional Status Scale were used to investigate unidimensionality, residual correlation, continuous tracking, scale coverage/targeting, and person segregation of the CTS-6, Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Status Scale. FSS items were ordered response categories. In the CTS-6 and the BCTQ SSS, two items had conflicting item performance favoring age or gender. Conclusions: The CTS-6 has superior psychometric characteristics in surgically treated patients relative to the BCTQ SSS in surgically treated patients, according to Rasch's report.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-36216/v1


The Association between Disability and Psychological Distress in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Patients with Extraterritorial Symptoms

Abstract Background and Aims: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a median nerve neuropathy that causes typical nerve pains along the median nerve pathway. Therefore, assessing the illness causing and its association with psychological distress is vital. This paper seeks to determine the degree of psychological distress, disability, and upper extremity symptoms in CTS patients with extraterritorial signs and the association between disability, mental trauma, and nerve conduction studies. Participants were patients with CTS with extraterritorial signs. Patients with extraterritorial signs of autism, extreme pain, borderline abnormalities, and depression, as well as dysfunctional anger, was reported by 44 percent disability with 54. 9 percent severity to extreme pain, widespread anxiety and depression, and distressing anger. There was a strong positive correlation between disability severity and anxiety, depression, and anger. Interpretation: This research opens the way for future research to determine the role of psychological factors in the dissemination of extraterritorial disorders as a component of other mechanisms that have been investigated by previous studies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-1871147/v1

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions