Advanced searches left 3/3

Carpal Tunnel Hand - Crossref

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 13 November 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Can Carpal Tunnel Syndrome be Appropriately Diagnosed in a Cold Hand?

INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND The diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in nerve conduction studies has traditionally involved warming the hand to prevent misleading extension of distal latency. Comparing the median nerve DL to the ulnar and radial nerves using the combined sensory index has been shown to increase the accuracy of CTS diagnosis. METHODS The authors conducted a prospective, controlled, cohort study of 20 symptomatic control patients and 21 symptomatic patients with confirmed CTS. The CSI measured under both cold and warm conditions, revealing that symptomatic patients underwent nerve conduction experiments. RESULTS Control subjects with warm hands had an average CSI of 0. 0 milliseconds and -0. 3 meters with cold hands, respectively. Subjects with warm hands had an average CSI of 3. 2 meters and 3. 7 meters with cold hands. CONCLUSIONS During this investigation, cold temperature did not result in misclassification of either control patients or CTS patients when CSI was used to determine diagnosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.51894/001c.25941


Outcomes of Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery With Home Guided Hand Therapy Versus No Hand Therapy: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial After Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release

Background: Following carpal tunnel repair surgery, the most recent American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines found no high-quality research comparing home therapy to no therapy. This research was designed to compare the results of patients receiving home therapy and patients receiving no therapy following endoscopic CTRS. Patients were randomly assigned either home hand therapy or no therapy postoperatively. As primary outcome measures, the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores, as well as Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire scores, were assessed as primary outcome measures. Fifty patients were randomized to home therapy, while 55 patients were randomized to no therapy. Both treatment groups' QuickDASH, BCTQ's functional status scale, and the BCTQ's symptom severity scale increased with time. Conclusions: This blinded, prospective randomized controlled trial found no significant difference between patients receiving no therapy or home therapy following endoscopic CTRS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/15589447221122824


Independent risk factors of carpal tunnel syndrome: Assessment of body mass index, hand, wrist and finger anthropometric measurements

BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to establish the role of BMI, hand, wrist, and finger anthropometric variables in the CTS's development and to compare these measured variables between control and CTS participants. Mean values of all measurements were compared between cases and controls, and benchmarks were compared among patients and controls, and logistic regression analysis revealed the presence of independent risk factors. The wrist width, wrist circumference, hand index, hand to height index, and wrist index were among the measured measurements and calculated indices that showed the significant differences between two groups. In the sample, the wrist index, wrist depth, and wrist width were the most important factors in CTS growth. CONCLUSION: Wrist parameters play a significant role in predicting the growth of CTS, although BMI was not reported as a risk factor.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3233/wor-210910


Flexor Tenosynovectomy for Recurrent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Retrospective Case Series of 108 Hands

Background: The etiology of recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome is uncertain, and outcomes in this population following secondary surgery have been poorer than primary surgery. In the flexor tenosynovium in these patients, fibrosis and hypertrophy have been identified. After primary carpal tunnel installation and publication of a survey of these patients, the authors use flexor tenosynovectomy for recurrent CTS. Methods: Four attending surgeons at one center performed a retrospective chart review of 108 cases of recurrent CTS from 1995 to 2015 by four attending surgeons at one hospital. A total of 104 cases of symptom relief was reported, with 48 reporting complete symptom resolution. Satisfied patients were older than unsatisfied patients. Conclusion: Both long-term satisfaction and QuickDASH ratings in our cohort are similar or higher than published findings from nerve-shielding techniques. The authors claim that a decrease in both carpal tunnel volume and potential adhesions of fibrotic or inflammatory synovium contributes to the results of this therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1558944719840735

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

Source Recommendations

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions