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Carpal Tunnel Surgery - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Initial experience with endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery

Of the patients in whom surgery was unsuccessful, those that have undergone postoperative analysis of nerve conduction velocities have seen change or normalization. After a previous open procedure in the contralateral hand, three patients underwent ECTR after a previous open procedure; both three patients preferred the ECTR technique. ECTR is a promising method that has similar efficacy to opening CTR and has the potential to be a superior device.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.7


Outcome of carpal tunnel release surgery in patients with diabetes

The surgical results of 149 patients with diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome who underwent transverse carpal ligament release surgery have been published. Regardless of any contributing causes, the majority of diabetic patients with diabetes had a positive surgical result, according to a review of preoperative and postoperative symptoms, research, medical reports, and patient self-assessment. These results compare favorably with those of the control group: 200 nondiabetic patients, of whom 90% rated their results from carpal tunnel release surgery as excellent to excellent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.13


Two-portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery: report of early experience

Endoscopic carpal tunnel release is also used to address median nerve entrapment neuropathy at the transverse carpal ligament. These procedures' founders claim that early postoperative benefits can be gained by the patient in the form of reduced pain and weakness, facilitating a quicker return to work. Investigating curve anomalies occurred in a prospective review of the authors' first 51 cases using a two-portal endoscopic procedure was carried out to see if these learning curve disorders were related.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.8


Postoperative management following carpal tunnel release surgery: principles of rehabilitation

The patient with unsatisfactory result following carpal tunnel release is undoubtedly the exception rather than the rule. The vast majority of properly selected and treated patients will recover uneventfully without the need for extensive therapy. Patients with a poor result may have three key signs or symptoms, which may occur in combination or alone. If left untreated, these are the patients who will continue to suffer persistent median nerve pain, stiffness, and, in the rare case of reflex sympathetic dystrophy or sympathetically mediated pain. If identified early and enrolled in a good therapy program, the majority of these patients will receive the correct medication and will be happy with their result, and will likely be satisfied with their results. The author discusses here a protocol for the postoperative care of the patient who underwent carpal tunnel release surgery, with a special emphasis on the identification and care of those patients at risk for a poor result.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.12


Effectiveness of an Endoscopic Recurrent Branch Release Procedure Combined with Standard Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Compared to Standard Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Alone: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

Background: The aim of this research is to determine the safety of endoscopic delivery of the recurrent branch of the surrounding soft tissue in combination with standard endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery to standard ECTR surgery alone in patients with inherited abductor pollicis brevis muscle weakness. Methods: We compared the recovery rates of postoperative clinical signs in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome in whom the APB muscle was zero and with undetectable distal motor latency of APB, to those who underwent standard ECTR surgery alone and those that underwent recurrent branch closure in addition to standard ECTR. Conclusions: Endoscopic introduction of the recurrent branch in conjunction with standard ECTR surgery resulted in higher recovery rates in MRC-APB and DML recovery in comparison to standard ECTR surgery alone.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1142/s2424835522500904

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions