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Carpal Tunnel Surgery - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 August 2022

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Outcome of carpal tunnel release surgery in patients with diabetes

The surgical results in 149 patients with diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome who underwent transverse carpal ligament repair surgery are published. Regardless of any of the contributing factors, the majority of diabetic patients with diabetes had a favorable surgical outcome, as described by the analysis of preoperative and postoperative symptoms, clinical trials, and patient self-assessment. These results are compared favorably to those of the control group's: 200 nondiabetic patients, of whom 90% rated their results from carpal tunnel release surgery as fair to excellent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.13


Postoperative management following carpal tunnel release surgery: principles of rehabilitation

The patient with unhappy result after carpal tunnel release is the exception rather than the rule. The dissatisfied patient, although rare, makes for an extremely difficult management challenge. Patients with a poor result may have three key signs or symptoms, some of which may occur in combination or alone. These are the patients who will continue to experience persistent median nerve pain, stiffness, and, possibly even reflex sympathetic dystrophy or sympathetically mediated pain if left untreated. Most of these patients will receive the right treatment and will be happy with their result if identified early and placed in an appropriate therapy program, and will eventually be happy with their results. The author provides here a protocol for the postoperative care of a patient who has undergone carpal tunnel release surgery, with emphasis on the identification and treatment of those patients at risk for a poor result.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.12


Two-portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery: report of early experience

The transverse carpal ligament's median nerve entrapment neuropathy is progressively treated by endoscopic carpal tunnel release. Early postoperative benefits can be gained by the patient in the form of reduced pain and weakness, facilitating a faster return to work. These learning curve complications were present in a prospective analysis of the authors' first 51 cases using a two-portal endoscopic technique was conducted to determine whether these learning curve difficulties arise.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.8


Initial experience with endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery

In 24 patients, twenty-six ECTR surgeries were performed. Any of the patients in whom surgery was unsuccessful, those who have undergone postoperative examination of nerve conduction velocities have seen improvement or normalization. Following a previous open procedure in the contralateral hand, three patients underwent ECTR; the majority of three patients preferred the ECTR technique; both three patients preferred the ECTR procedure.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.7


Anesthesia for Carpal Tunnel Surgery

Carpal tunnel surgery to relieve the entrapped median nerve is a common outpatient procedure in ambulatory surgical centers. The endoscopic carpal tunnel introduction is the latest in less invasive surgical technique. The surgeon's most common anesthesia therapy is monitored anesthesia care, which involves intravenous sedation and local anesthetic infiltration by the surgeon. Patients must be identified and monitored anesthesia care and regional anesthesia in lieu of general anesthesia for outpatient procedures, which has put a greater emphasis on patient selection and utilization of clinical anesthesia and regional anesthesia in lieu of general anesthesia for outpatient procedures.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190850692.003.0042


Structural validity of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its short version, the 6-Item CTS Symptoms Scale: A Rasch analysis one year after surgery

Abstract Background: The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its shorter version, the Six-Item Carpal Tunnel Symptoms Scale, are frequently used for evaluating function and/or symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. This review examined the BCTQ and CTS-6 in patients who had undergone surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome treatment. Methods: The data for this cross-sectional review was obtained from 217 adult patients who had undergone carpal tunnel release surgery a year earlier. In the BCTQ SSS, one item in the CTS-6 and two others showed different item operation based on age or gender. Four items in the BCTQ SSS and two items in the CTS-6 varied by category thresholds, with two items in the BCTQ SSS and two others in the CTS-6 showing disorganized response category thresholds. Ordered response category thresholds were established due to Merging of the relevant response categories. Conclusions: Based on the RMT's results, the CTS-6 has superior psychometric results in surgically treated patients relative to the BCTQ SSS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-36216/v2


Structural Validity of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its Short Version the 6-Item CTS Symptoms Scale: A Rasch Analysis One Year After Surgery

Abstract Background: The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and its shorter version, Six-Item Carpal Tunnel Symptoms Scale, are widely used for assessing function and/or symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The present research looked at the BCTQ and CTS-6 questionnaire among patients who had undergone surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome treatment. Methods: The data was obtained from 217 adult patients who had undergone carpal tunnel surgery and had been released a year before. The BCTQ's CTS-6, Symptom Severity Scale, and Functional Status Scale were all used to investigate the unidimensionality, residual correlation, sample coverage/targeting, and person separation. Some BCTQ SSS and CTS-6 items had disordered response category threshold thresholds. Ordered response category thresholds were set by merging of response categories. Conclusions: The CTS-6 has superior psychometric performance in surgically treated patients relative to the BCTQ SSS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-36216/v1


Self-Reported Outcomes for Patients Undergoing Revision Carpal Tunnel Surgery With or Without Hypothenar Fat Pad Transposition

Background: Carpal tunnel surgery is the most common surgical procedure carried out on the hand. The aim of this research is to compare the results of patients with and without hypothalenar fat pad transposition. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients undergoing revision carpal tunnel surgery at our hospital between 2002 and 2014. The study period ended with seventy-six patients undergoing revision carpal tunnel surgery. Likewise, total symptom severity and functional scores were not statistically significant among groups; however, a trend toward increased symptom severity was observed in patients undergoing decompression alone. Conclusions: Our findings show there are no differences in self-reported symptom severity and function in patients undergoing revision carpal tunnel surgery with repeat decompression alone or decompression with fat pad transposition.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1558944717701243


Short incision versus minimally invasive surgery with tool-kit for carpal tunnel syndrome release: a prospective randomized control trial to evaluate the anterior wrist pain and time to return to work or activities

Background The study compared findings in terms of early postoperative anterior wrist pain and return to work or daily life of patients who underwent carpal tunnel syndrome prevention with short incision and those with minimally invasive CTS kits. Methods A total of 24 patients diagnosed with primary CTS confirmed with electrodiagnosis at an academic university hospital were randomly divided into one of two groups of 12 patients each: a short incision group and an MIS with tool-kit group, which used computer-generated block randomization. At the second week postoperatively as well as the time to return to daily living and work, the key findings were visually analogue scale assessment of pain intensity in the anterior carpal region.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-022-05663-5


Use of diffusion tensor imaging as a prognostic biomarker after decompression surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome

Background Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging has increasingly been used for carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis, but little is known about the effects of CTS therapy on median nerve stability and functional outcome prediction. Purpose: Objective Objective: To determine how structural changes in MR-DTI in patients with CTS sufferers before and after decompression surgery reveal symptom severity, functional status, and electrophysiological characteristics. The apparent diffusion coefficients and fractional anisotropy of the MN were determined in three different countriesu2014distal radioulnar joint, pisiform bone, and hamate bone, which were correlated with clinical and electrophysiological findings. Figures: The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire's scores decreased 1. 55 points and 1. 01 points in both the symptomatic and functional domains, respectively, according to a psychologist. Conclusion Our review revealed that pre- and postoperative proximal FA values were useful biomarkers for the structural evaluation of the MN in patients with CTS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/02841851221113518

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions