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Carpal Tunnel Release - Crossref

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Last Updated: 13 January 2023

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The angular course of the median nerve in the distal forearm and its anatomical importance in preventing nerve injury in a modern era of carpal tunnel release

Several texts show the median nerve as navigating a course parallel to the long axis of the forearm. METHODS TECTORS During cadaveric dissection of 76 wrist specimens, the width of the wrist, the transition from the radial wrist to the MN, and the distance between the flexor digitorum superficialis tendons were measured. RESULTS THE MN's relative position at the distal wrist crease was determined by the ratio between the MN and the radial wrist divided by wrist width, resulting in a mean value of 0. 48, implying that the nerve was usually found just radial to midline. The mean distance between the distal wrist crease and the MN's appearance was 34. 6 mm.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.4.jns152672


Initial experience with endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery

A retrospective review of patients who underwent endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery at the authors' hospital during the last 18 months was performed. In 24 patients, twenty-six ECTR procedures were performed. Of the patients in whom surgery was unsuccessful, those who have undergone postoperative examination of nerve conduction velocities have seen improvement or normalization. After a previous open procedure in the contralateral hand, three patients underwent ECTR therapy; all three patients preferred the ECTR procedure; the ECTR technique was preferred by three patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.7


Microsurgical carpal tunnel release

The author explores a group of 482 patients who underwent primary carpal tunnel release surgery as a child in 1987. For a total of 570 hands, two hundred twenty-five patients underwent CTR in the right hand, 169 patients underwent CTR in the left hand, and 88 patients underwent bilateral CTR surgery. In five patients, the recurrent thenar branch advanced through the middle or ulnar portion of the ligament, and this branch was preserved in both five cases. Perioperative problems included stitch absces in nine hands, which were treated on an outpatient basis; deep wound infections developed in three hands; and these patients were treated for intravenous antibiotic therapy and wound care; and diabetic infections were reported in three hands; Perioperative complications included stitch absces in nine hands; and surgical infections were present in three hands; and perioperative complications were reported in three hands; and wound care was required. As a result of a fall, one steroid-dependent patient developed wound dehiscence, and the wound was primarily repaired. Two patients developed u201ctrigger finger (u201d 6 months postoperatively), and they were referred to as u201ctrigger finger (u201d). The mean time from work for those patients not receiving Workers' Compensation was 3 weeks, but for those receiving Workers' Compensation it was 6. 5 weeks. In 431 of 482 patients, the complete removal of painful dysesthesias occurred. In 438 of 454 patients with preoperative motor dysfunction, motor impairment was noted. In patients who had previously undergone surgery at another hospital, an additional eight procedures were performed; four of them had no signs of their transverse carpal ligament being sectioned, according to the four. 14 patients with thenar/hypothenar pains were treated from 1 to 5 years postsurgery. The average total time in the outpatient surgical operating room is 35 to 40 minutes. Microsurgical CTR is thought to be safer and most cost-effective, and it is likely to be more cost-effective.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.6


The anatomy of the Berrettini branch: implications for endoscopic carpal tunnel release

In 100 fresh cadaver palms, hand dissections were done to determine the degree of superficial palmar contact between the median and ulnar nerves occurs and to what extent it might result in iatrogenic injury after endoscopic carpal tunnel opening. Thirty hands were classed as Group 1, 16 hands were designated as Group 2, and 35 hands were labeled as Group 3, according to the government. In light of the fact that superficial palmar contact between the median and ulnar nerve nerves may be the most likely anatomical finding, the more likely anatomical result can be avoided by using this technological enhancement.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.10


Outcome of carpal tunnel release surgery in patients with diabetes

The surgical results in 149 patients with diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome who underwent transverse carpal ligament repair surgery have been reported. The majority of diabetic patients with diabetes had a favorable surgical result, regardless of any other contributing causes. The analysis of preoperative and postoperative signs, medical reports, epidemiological studies, and patient self-assessment showed that the overwhelming majority of diabetic patients with diabetes had a favorable surgical result. These results compare favorably with those of the control group: 200 nondiabetic patients, of whom 90% rated their carpal tunnel release surgery findings as fair to excellent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.13


Two-portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery: report of early experience

Endoscopic carpal tunnel release is increasingly used to treat median nerve entrapment neuropathy at the transverse carpal ligament. Prosecutors maintain that there are early postoperative benefits to be gained by the patient in the form of reduced pain and weakness, which aids in a quicker return to function. To determine whether these learning curve difficulties occurred, a prospective review of the authors' first 51 cases using a two-portal endoscopic method was conducted.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.8


Postoperative management following carpal tunnel release surgery: principles of rehabilitation

Fortunately, the patient with unsatisfactory result following carpal tunnel placement is the exception rather than the rule. Patients with a poor result usually have three common signs or symptoms, which may appear in combination or alone. These are the patients who will continue to experience persistent median nerve pains, elasticity, and possibly even sympathetic dystrophy or sympathetically mediated pain if left untreated. If identified early and enrolled in a good therapy center, the majority of these patients will get the right treatment and will be delighted with their result, and will eventually be satisfied with their results. The author describes here a protocol for the postoperative care of the patient who has undergone carpal tunnel release surgery, with a focus on the identification and treatment of those patients at risk for a poor result.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.1997.3.1.12


Economic benefit of carpal tunnel release in the Medicare patient population

OBJECTIVES The epidemiology of carpal tunnel syndrome has been extensively researched. However, results describing CTS' economic burden are limited, while CTS' economic burden is minimal. METHODS The authors used the PearlDiver database to determine the number of people with CTS in the Medicare patient population, and then used CPT codes to determine which patients underwent surgical monitoring. RESULTS FROM 2005 To 2012 There were 1,500,603 individuals identified in the Medicare patient population with the diagnosis of CTS from 2005 to 2012. Endoscopic carpal tunnel installation service achieved between $ 11,683 and $ 23,186 per patient at 100% success, while open carpal tunnel construction provided between $ 10,711 and $22,132 per patient at 100% success. CONCLUSIONS CTS is prevalent in the Medicare patient population and is associated with a significant burden on the economy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.1.focus17802


The Impact of Carpal Tunnel Release on Two-Point Discrimination, Quick Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score and Distal Motor Latency – A Multi-centre Prospective Study

Background: The authors conducted a prospective, multi-centre analysis to determine the effects of carpal tunnel release on Two-Point Discrimination, Quick Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Score, as well as Distal Motor Latency. The secondary objectives of the study were to determine if the postoperative results were different at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up, as well as the preoperative severity of carpal tunnel syndrome. At five hospitals over a two-year period, a total of 205 hands in 171 patients underwent CTR at five hospitals. For all patients, preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively, the 2-PD, Q-DASH, and DL were determined, as well as 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Patients were divided into two groups, u2018mildu2019 and u2018severeu2019, based on pre-operative DL results, and u2019severeu2019 u2019. Conclusions: CTR is a safe treatment for patients with CTS with significant improvement in all three outcome measures.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1142/s2424835522500941


Effectiveness of an Endoscopic Recurrent Branch Release Procedure Combined with Standard Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Compared to Standard Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Alone: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

Background: The aim of this research is to determine the success of endoscopic release of the recurrent branch from the surrounding soft tissue in combination with standard endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery to standard ECTR surgery alone in patients with demonstrated abductor pollicis brevis muscle infirmity. Methods: We compared the recovery rates of postoperative respiratory distress in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome, who underwent standard ECTR surgery alone, to those who underwent standard ECTR surgery in addition to standard ECTR, to those who underwent regular branch release in lieu of standard ECTR. Conclusions: Endoscopic introduction of the recurrent branch with standard ECTR surgery resulted in improved recovery rates in MRC-APB and DML recovery in comparison to traditional ECTR surgery alone.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1142/s2424835522500904

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions