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Carpal Tunnel - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Carpal tunnel syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that results from nerve dysfunctional disruptions that lead to pain and numbness or tingling mainly in the wrist and hand. Although carpal tunnel syndrome can occur at any age, it most commonly affects people aged 40 to 60. Writing is the most common hand when only one hand is affected, it is usually the hand used for writing. The ache or paresthesia is typically felt in the wrist, the palm, and the first four fingers of the hand. Carpal tunnel syndrome can be triggered by certain activities that stretch or extend the wrist, such as driving, typing, or holding a telephone. People with carpal tunnel syndrome can have muscle and nerve pain in the affected hand as well as a reduced ability to detect sensations, which can be mistaken for an improvement of symptoms.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/carpal-tunnel-syndrome


Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

Hereditary neuropathy with connection to pressure palsies is a disorder that affects peripheral nerves. Hereditary neuropathy with connection to pressure palsies is characterized by recurring episodes of numbness, tingling, and muscle loss in the area of concern with the affected nerve, usually an arm, hand, leg, or foot. Pressure on a single nerve causes a pressure palsy episode, and any peripheral nerve can be affected. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in people with this disorder, and it occurs when a nerve in the wrist is involved. An episode of nerve compression in the knee can result in a condition called foot drop, which makes walking, scaling stairs, or driving difficult or impossible. The signs of hereditary neuropathy with responsibility to pressure palsies usually start in childhood or early adulthood, but they can develop from childhood to late adulthood. Life expectancy is not affected by hereditary neuropathy linked to pressure palsies.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hereditary-neuropathy-with-liability-to-pressure-palsies


Acromicric dysplasia

Acromastic dysplasia is a disorder that is characterized by short stature, short limbs, stiff joints, and specific facial features. Newborns with acromic dysplasia are of normal size, but short stature is a result of slow growth over time. Adults with this disorder have an average height of 4 feet, 2 inches for women and 4 feet, 5 inches for men. Affected people are more likely to experience carpal tunnel syndrome, which is characterized by numbness, tingling, and hand and finger weakness. In this condition, a misalignment of the hip joints can also occur. Some patients with these skeletal and joint injuries may need medical attention, but most affected individuals have no restrictions in their daily activities. A round face, sharply defined eyebrows, long eyelashes, a bulbous nose with upturned nostrils, a long nose with short lips, and a small mouth with thin lips are all typical of acromic dysplasia.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/acromicric-dysplasia


Mucopolysaccharidosis type II

Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, also known as Hunter syndrome, is a disorder that affects multiple areas of the body and occurs almost exclusively in males. People with MPS II at birth are unlikely to have any of the condition's characteristics. People with MPs II tend to have a thick skin that is not elastic. Some of the affected individuals have also noticeable white skin growths that look like pebbles. Some people with MPS II have problems with the light-sensitive tissue in the back of the eye and reduced vision. The spinal cord can be weakened and bruised by narrowing the spinal canal in the neck. Many people develop heart valve problems, and MPS II also impacts the heart. Heart valve abnormalities can cause the heart to expand and may lead to heart failure. Children with MPS II do steadily increase until about age 5, but then their growth slows and they develop short stature. Multiple skeletal abnormalities seen on x-ray are present among those MPs II and III. Although both types impact many organs and tissues as described above, people with severe MPS II also experience a decrease in cognitive function and a more rapid disease progression. Individuals with mild MPS II also have a shorter lifespan, but their intelligence is unaffected, and they generally live into adulthood. In people with both types of MPS II, heart disease and airway obstruction are two major causes of death.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mucopolysaccharidosis-type-ii


Transthyretin amyloidosis

Transthyretin amyloidosis is a slowly progressing disease characterized by the accumulation of abnormal deposits of a protein called amyloid in the body's organs and tissues. There are three main forms of transthyretin amyloidosis, which can be distinguished by their signs and organ systems that influence. Transthyretin amyloidosis's neuropathic form affects primarily the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, resulting in peripheral neuropathy and difficulty controlling bodily functions. Some people have heart and kidney problems as well as diabetes. Many eye problems may arise, such as cloudiness of the clear gel that fills the eyeballs, dry eyes, increased pressure in the eyes, or pupils with an irregular or "scalloped" appearance. Some people with this disorder develop carpal tunnel syndrome, which is characterized by numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hands and fingers. Transthyretin amyloidosis, which is primarily related to the central nervous system, is the leptomeningeal variant of transthyretin amyloidosis. Eye problems similar to those in the neuropathic condition may also occur. When people with leptomeningoretin amyloidosis have eye problems, they are thought to be in the oculomanic form. Transthyretin amyloidosis affects the heart. An abnormal heartbeat, enlarged heart, or orthostatic hypertension may be present in people with cardiac amyloidosis. Occasionally, people with transthyretin amyloidosis have mild peripheral neuropathy.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/transthyretin-amyloidosis


Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII

Most babies with hydrops fetalis are either born or die shortly after birth. People with MPS VII begin to exhibit signs and symptoms of the disorder in early childhood. Some people with MPS VII may become crowded, resulting in frequent upper respiratory infections and short pauses in breathing during sleep. People with MPS VII may also suffer with recurring ear infections and hearing loss. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in several children with MPS VII and is characterized by numbness, tingling, and a lack of hand and fingers. People with MPS VII may experience a narrowing of the spinal canal in the neck, which may expand and damage the spinal cord. Depending on the severity of the symptoms, people with MPS VII have different life expectancy. People with MPS VII are also affected by heart disease and airway obstruction.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mucopolysaccharidosis-type-vii


Mucopolysaccharidosis type I

Mucopolysaccharidosis type I is a disease that affects several areas of the body. Children with MPs have no signs or symptoms of the condition at birth, although some have a soft out-pouching around the belly-button or lower abdomen. People with severe MPS generally begin showing other signs and symptoms of the disorder within the first year of life, while those with the attenuated form have milder characteristics that appear later in life. In some people with MPS I, the airway can become narrow, resulting in frequent upper respiratory infections and short pauses in breathing during sleep. People with MPs Can often experience clouding of the eye's clear covering of the eye, which can cause substantial vision loss. Also affected individuals may experience hearing loss and persistent ear infections. MPs have short stature and joint deformities that affect mobility. Some people with MPS have short stature and joint deformities that can influence mobility. Multiple skeletal abnormalities seen on x-ray show multiple skeletal abnormalities in common people with the chronic disease. The spinal cord can be compressed and damaged by narrowing the spinal canal in the neck. Although both types of MPS I can influence many organs and tissues, people with chronic MPS I have a decrease in intellectual function and a more rapid disease progression. Attenuated MPs I typically live into adulthood, and may or not have a shorter lifespan. People with both types of MPS I have heart disease and airway obstruction are common causes of death in people with both types of MPS I.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mucopolysaccharidosis-type-i

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions