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Carpal Tunnel - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 November 2022

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Efficacy and safety of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: A network meta-analysis of different injection treatments

Purpose: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common symptom of median nerve compression in the wrist exacerbated by focal peripheral neuropathy. Platelet-rich plasma therapy may be able to increase the healing rate by exposing the injured tissues to high concentrations of autologous growth factors. Our research seeks to compare all injective therapies for CTS and determine the safety and priority of PRP therapy. We only included results from random controlled studies that assessed PRP injection therapy or opioid injection therapy. In total, 5% dextrose injections were the best treatment option for the VAS, followed by triamcinolone injections and PRP injections. PRP came in second only to steroids and estrogen, according to the SUCRA's ranking of PRP, second only to steroids and estrogen. PRP is a cheaper alternative to CTS therapy. With a wide indication and positive outcome, PRP injection is second only to steroids and estrogen in the treatment efficacy of CTS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2022.906075


Carpal Tunnel Release Performed during Distal Radius Fracture Surgery

Abstract Background Carpal Tunneling can be carried out collaboratively with distal radius fracture open reduction internal fixation to avoid carpal tunnel syndrome; however, there is little to no research examining the prevalence, risk factors, and complications associated with CTR. Questions/Purposes The aim was to determine the rate of CTR carried out at the time of DRF ORIF, as well as CTR's causes, and whether CTR was related to any difficulties. Patients with intra-articular fractures of two or three fragments were significantly higher than CTR for patients with extra-articular fractures, which was much higher than those with extra-articular fractures. In comparison to overweight and obese patients, obese patients underwent CTR at a much faster rate. These results should be considered when determining clinical guidelines to determine the need for CTR in patients undergoing DRF ORIF.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-1756501


Epidermal Inclusion Cyst Formation: Late Complication of Carpal Tunnel Release

Abstract Background Epidermal inclusion cysts are epidermally lined, keratin containing cysts that arise as keratinizing epithelium becomes embedded in deeper subcutaneous tissue, usually following penetrating injury or, in rare cases, surgery. Case Description A 64-year-old woman with a history of left open CTR 17 years ago presented our hospital with unprovoked left palmar pain, swelling, and fluctuation. Literature Review of Literature The patient presented within 2 years following CTR surgery and had what was later reported as an EIC and recurrent median nerve compression symptoms, which was later confirmed to be an EIC and recurrent median nerve compression symptoms. Clinical relevance: In the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of prior hand surgery and subsequent infection should be considered, as incision and drainage alone will not adequately care for an EIC.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-1756513


A preliminary study of radioulnar wrist compression in improving patient-reported outcomes of carpal tunnel syndrome

This report looked at the effects of radioulnar wrist compression on patient-reported outcomes related to carpal tunnel syndrome. After 2 weeks, our results revealed that radioulnar wrist compression increased SSS by 0. 55 points. In patients with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, radioulnar wrist compression may be a safe alternative therapy in improving sensory related symptoms.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-022-05943-0


Effect of Fatigue on Grip Force Control During Object Manipulation in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Both before and after hand muscle exhaustion, eight participants with carpal tunnel syndrome and eight matched controls manipulated a test object fitted with an accelerometer and force sensor. Both object and object acceleration data were collected and used to determine grip force control variables that included Grip Force Peak, Safety Margin, and Time to Grip Force Peak. Individuals with CTS had a higher Safety Margin and Longer Time to Peak of Grip Force than healthy controls during object manipulation, and a longer time to Peak of Grip Force was observed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1123/mcj.16.4.521


Carpal tunnel syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients: the role of combined ultrasonographic and electrophysiological assessment

Abstract Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common medical extra-articular disorders in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The aim of our investigation is to determine the local causes of carpal tunnel syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients by ultrasonography, and whether inflammatory or abnormal variations could influence decision-making and patient management. Results from CTS severity, median nerve distal motor latency, motor/sensory NCV, peak sensory latency, amplitude of SNAP, and median-radial latency difference test were found. Conclusions In bronchial arthritis patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, inflammatory inflammation and local causes of median nerve compression such as bifid median nerve, persistent median artery, and accessory muscle bundle are all contributing factors in the etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s43166-022-00147-9


Carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to tumoral calcinosis: a case report and review of the literature

Abstract Background Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment disorder. We discuss a rare case of CTS secondary to tumoral calcinosis and then searched the English literature to reveal the complete information of all reported cases with this entity. median nerve compression at the level of the carpal tunnel was found by the patient's signs, symptoms, physical examination, and nerve electrodiagnostic testing. CTS secondary to tumoral calcinosis is a rare benign disease. When treating a previously healthy patient with chronic CTS symptoms, physicians should remain vigilant and include it in their differential diagnosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-022-05934-1


The angular course of the median nerve in the distal forearm and its anatomical importance in preventing nerve injury in a modern era of carpal tunnel release

METHODS 76 wrist specimens were discovered during cadaveric dissection of 76 wrist specimens, along with the distance from the radial wrist to the MN, and the distance from the distal volar wrist to the MN, which was the MN. ImagesJ reports, in particular, the angles between the MN and FCR tendon and the LAF were measured. RESULTS The MN at the distal wrist crease was found by the ratio of the MN to the radial wrist divided by wrist width, resulting in a mean value of 0. 48, indicating that the nerve was normally located just radial to midline. The mean angle between the MN and the FCR tendon was 14. 1 U00b0. The MN and the LAF had an angle of 8. 8 u00b0.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.4.jns152672


Carpal tunnel syndrome: matching minimally invasive surgical techniques

The transillumination technique used in 473 cases was used with a single wrist incision and a single linear wrist incision for accessing the carpalotome; in 216 cases, transillumination was discontinued and a single linear wrist incision was made; and in 583 cases, the methods were improved by making a second incision in the palm using the carpalotome. Complete remission of symptoms was obtained in 90 percent of patients in Group A, 88% of those in Group B, and 99. 8% of patients in Group C. 44 patients in Group A, 24 in Group B, recovered, and only 1 in Group C underwent repeat surgery using the open technique, with one in Group A underwent a repeat operation with the open technique. The method of median nerve decompression at the wrist, which was used for patients in Group C, is a viable alternative to CTS therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns/2008/108/5/1033


Magnetic resonance imaging compared with electrodiagnostic studies in patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome: predicting symptoms, function, and surgical benefit at 1 year

Object The aim of this review was to compare the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging with that of electrodiagnostic studies for the following objectives: 1) a forecast of 1-year results and 2 identification of patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment. The individual surgeon who had access to the initial EDS but not the MR imaging findings was able to decide whether to treat patients conservatively or by carpal tunnel release. Patients who underwent surgery showed greater improvement at 1 year than those who did not have surgery. The length of the abnormal T2-weighted nerve signal on MR imaging and median-u2013ulnar sensory latency difference were the most reliable predictors of surgical benefit. There was a strong patient preference for MR imaging over EDSs in MR imaging. Conclusions The results from MR imaging of the carpal tunnel indicate surgical benefit independent of nerve conduction studies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns/2008/108/3/0541

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions