Advanced searches left 3/3

Carotid Artery Aneurysm - Europe PMC

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 09 November 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Acute middle cerebral artery occlusion caused by spontaneous thrombosis of a small internal carotid artery aneurysm: illustrative case.

Nongiant aneurysms have a rare characteristic of a thrombosis of a saccular, unruptured, intracranial aneurysm. The authors discuss a case of acute middle cerebral artery occlusion due to spontaneous thrombus of a small internal carotid artery aneurysm. After which secondary stroke prophylaxis containing warfarin potassium was initiated, the authors treated acute phase MCO with mechanical thrombectomy. Since the thrombus had been removed from the left ICA aneurysm and the entire aneurysm was characterized by MRA, coil embolization was carried out, the thrombus had disappeared from the left ICA aneurysm and the entire aneurysm was clarified by MRA. If the proximal aneurysm is a potential embolic source, repairing the proximal aneurysm may prevent strokes.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36317241


Left ophthalmic segment internal carotid artery aneurysm treated with flow diversion in a child with Apert syndrome: technical note.

Introduction The prevalence of intracranial aneurysms in children with Apert syndrome has not been reported, but the emergence of an aneurysm as a result of craniofacial surgery has never been reported. Given the recent and rapid growth of the aneurysm in the aftermath of follow-up MRI, the patient underwent a medical investigation followed by successful flow-diversion treatment of the aneurysm with the Pipeline embolization system. ICA, MCA, and anterior cerebral artery stenoses were found for several weeks, and the patient underwent angioplasties for the ICA and MCA stenoses.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36310015


Retreatment of a recurrent giant aneurysm of the internal carotid artery after treatment with a flow-diverting stent.

Since FDSs were limited to simultaneous implantation of an additional FDS or explicit occlusion of the parent vessel, retreatment plans for recurrent large or giant aneurysms have been limiting. We present an example of a recurrent giant aneurysm that was initially treated with an FDS with coils and was successfully treated with an additional FDS. Additional FDS implantation for the regeneration of incompletely occluded aneurysms following the initial FDS treatment may be safe and effective.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36259164


Case report: Spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm rupture.

History of a Carotid cavernous fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm rupture is extremely unusual. We reported a case about a spontaneous CCF secondary to a ruptured PPTA aneurysm that was successfully embolized with coils and onyx-18 by a trans-arterial strategy. Case Report The 55-year-old female suffered with headache, left orbital pain, and pulsatile exophthalmos for the first month without a single history of trauma. From hospitalization to a one-year follow-up period, the patient had no neurological abnormalities. Conclusions The Trans-arterial route was a viable alternative for spontaneous CCF associated with ruptured PPTA aneurysm.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36147047


Ruptured fungal mycotic internal carotid artery aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coil embolization: A case report.

BACKGROUND The cause of the aneurysms of tortured intracranial fungal mycotic aneurysms is a high mortality. Here, we discuss the first case of a patient in whose ruptured fungal carotid artery aneurysm was treated by stent-assisted coil embolization. Case description A 76-year-old male receiving dual antiplatelet therapy following a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, which gave him blurred vision of the right eye and diplopia. A de novo irregularly shaped aneurysm at the cavernous portion of bleeding, projecting into the sphenoid sinus, which was thought to be the source of bleeding. The patient had no neurological impairment, and voriconazole therapy went on for a year without bleeding. Conclusions Stent-assisted coil embolization without parent artery occlusion may be a viable option for the urgent care of ruptured fungal mycotic aneurysms. For such patients, long-term treatment of voriconazole may be continued for 12 months.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36128098


Emergency surgical removal of a migrated coil during embolization of a giant internal carotid artery aneurysm: illustrative case.

Background Coil migration during endovascular therapy for an intracranial aneurysm is rare. Observations The authors reported a case of immediate coil migration after embolization of a massive intracranial segment of the internal carotid aneurysm. Following failed endovascular retrieval attempts, the patient underwent emergency surgical extraction. Without any new neurological deficits, the patient had full recovery. An emergency surgical removal of immediate coil migration was documented in a previous case. Hybrid neurological angiography in the operating suite may prevent unnecessary transfer and enable improved real-time visualization of the migration coil.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36051775


Panhypopituitarism caused by an unruptured giant cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm compressing the pituitary gland treated with a flow-diverting stent: A case report.

Aneurysms of the internal carotid artery aneurysms that mimics pituitary tumors and contributes to pituitary dysfunction are very rare within the intrasellar region. However, functional recovery of the pituitary gland is difficult. Case description We present a case of a 43-year-old woman who developed severe headaches and generalized malaise. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a massive unruptured ICA aneurysm that pulled the pituitary stalk contralaterally. Conclusion Flow-diverting stent deployment is ideal for large or massive carotid artery aneurysms with pituitary gland compression.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36128126


Treatment of Traumatic Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm by Flow-Diverter: A Single-Center Experience.

Aim Traumatic intracranial aneurysm is a rare vascular disease with varying origins and a high mortality rate when diagnosed late. Methods of Care For 8 patients: age, gender, epidemiologic causes, aneurysm location, aneurysm location, rupture, primary artery status, and postoperative complications were all recorded. 75% of patients were male and 25% female, with 25% male and 25% female. Due to a microwire, one patient experienced intraoperative iatrogenic rupture of the distal arterioles. None of the patients required new endovascular therapy during the follow-up, according to the patient's report. Conclusions Traumatic aneurysm is a vascular lesion with high mortality when diagnosed late.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36028352

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions