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Carotid Angioplasty - Crossref

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Last Updated: 03 May 2022

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Intracranial stent placement for the treatment of a carotid—cavernous fistula associated with intracranial angioplasty

In a patient with high-grade stenosis of the left cavernous internal carotid artery, angioplasty was performed using a 3 10-mm Open Sail coronary balloon. A long-term angiographic and medical review is needed to determine the suitability and longevity of intracranial angioplasty and stent placement in the treatment of symptomatic intracranial stenosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2003.98.5.1116


Endovascular therapy for stenosis of the petrous or cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery: percutaneous transluminal angioplasty compared with stent placement

The results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement for stenosis of the petrous or cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery were compared. Twenty-four patients with symptomatic, greater than 60% stenosis of the petrous or cavernous portion of the ICA were treated with PTA or stent placement; 15 patients were treated with PTA and nine with stent insertion; eight of them were treated with PTA and nine others were treated with PTA or stent placement; six others were treated with PTA, seven with PTA and nine others with stent insertion; five others were treated with PTA or insertion of the steno In 13 of 15 patients in the PTA group, and in all nine patients in the stent-treated group, the ICA's Stenotic portions were successfully opened in 13 of 15 patients in the PTA group, as well as in all nine patients. Stenoses in four patients in the PTA study were higher than 45% on follow-up angiography, which was performed from 3 to 6 months after PTA. From the perspective of initial and late increase in diameter, Stent placement is more cost-effective than PTA for stenosis of the petrous or cavernous portion of the ICA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2003.98.3.0491


Cost of treating high-risk symptomatic carotid artery stenosis: stent insertion and angioplasty compared with endarterectomy

Studies comparing the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial imply that definitive research establishing the safety and efficacy of carotid artery disease with stent placement for symptomatic, occlusive carotid artery disease necessitious carotid artery disease require further refinement and standardization of techniques, as well as large retrospective studies on a parse versus the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarted Endarte ed Endarte Symptomatic Carotid Endarte artery disease with a artery disease artery disease and effectiveness of carotid angid artery disease artery disease artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease and effic artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease, artery disease Despite the lack of such reports, numerous surgeons have performed angioplasty and stent placement in patients with perioperative risk and capable of disqualifying the patients from participating in NASCET. A long-running CEA computer database was tested for control patients with similar risk factors; 391 patients were identified. In each patient, real cost estimates, the length of hospital stay, and pertinent clinical data from the time of diagnosis to hospital discharge were collected. There was no overall cost difference between CEA and CAS in patients with high-risk, NASCET-ineligible CA stenosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2004.101.6.0904


Internal carotid artery stump angioplasty for the treatment of cerebrovascular occlusive disease

Nineteen patients underwent a total of 21 stump angioplasty procedures for an occluded internal carotid artery. In select patients, an occluded internal carotid artery stump removal by a stump angioplasty is most effective in avoiding embolic cerebrovascular disease's catastrophic sequela.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1986.65.4.0461


Resolution of petrous internal carotid artery stenosis after transluminal angioplasty

In a patient with persistent cardiovascular disease and intensive medical care, the use of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for the treatment of an isolated high-grade stenosis of the petrous internal carotid artery is described. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty may be a safe way to resolve selective intracranial stenosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1992.76.3.0520


Fatal rupture of the intracranial carotid artery during transluminal angioplasty for vasospasm induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage

During transluminal angioplasty for subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vaping, the authors discuss the clinical course, radiographic findings, and gross and microscopic pathology of a patient with fatal rupture of the supraclinoid segment of the left internal carotid artery. Since the vessel lumen "recreated" during the clipping procedure, some remaining and structurally imperfect aneurysm neck in the vessel wall remains, Caution is advised when performing transluminal angioplasty in the area of aneurysm clipping.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1991.74.6.0985


Long-term effects of in vivo angioplasty in normal and vasospastic canine carotid arteries: pharmacological and morphological analyses

To investigate the long-term effects of transluminal balloon angioplasty on the structure and function of the arterial wall, a canine model of hemorrhagic vasospasm of the high cervical internal carotid artery was used. Both distal cervical ICAs were surgically embedded in Forty dogs underwent surgical exposure, as well as baseline angiographic data on Day 0. Dogs in Group A underwent simple exposure of one ICA and the installation of a silicone elastomer cuff around a segment of the opposite artery. On Day 7 angiography was repeated and TBA was administered on a randomly selected ICA for dogs in Group B, blood clot—filled cuffs were placed around both ICAs, and blood clot—filled cuffs were placed around both ICAs, and angiography was performed on one randomly chosen ICA. The arteries in each animal were not exposed to TBA, blood-coated arteries not exposed to TBA, blood-coated arteries not exposed to TBA, blood-coated arteries not exposed to TBA, blood-coated arteries not exposed to TBA, normal arteries not exposed to TBA, and control arteries obtained from the proximal ICA. After tonic contraction to noradrenaline, and serotonin, isolated arterial rings from each ICA were recorded, but only mild changes in reaction to the calcium ionophore A 23187 and papaverine were noted, owing to tonic contraction to noradrenaline. These findings reveal that the canine high cervical ICA model produces consistent and reproducible vasospasm that follows a similar time course as that seen in humans. When TBA is administered in vainospastic arteries, it results in immediate functional impairment of vascular smooth muscle that lasts for two weeks, with resolution taking place at 3 weeks; morphological changes are mainly resolved 3 weeks post-TBA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1999.91.1.0100


Pathological effects of angioplasty on vasospastic carotid arteries in a rabbit model

To determine the pathological consequences of angioplasty on vaping arteries, 36 rabbits underwent angiography and induction of vaping by the addition of blood-filled or empty silastic sheaths around the cervical carotid arteries. Arterial narrowing was less apparent in the control groups on Day 2 compared to day 2. On Day 2 Angioplasty greatly increased arterial diameters of vasospastic arteries, but not those of control arteries. The arterial diameters of the arterial diameters grew by a similar degree on Day 7. Arteries remained dilated after angioplasty, although there was a lot of vaping 7 days after angioplasty was completed on Day 2 when angioplasty was carried out. Angioplasty did not cause significant arterial fibrosis as determined by hydroxyproline content. Endothelial and smooth-muscle cells in the rabbit model's case are destroyed by endothelial proliferation and decrease in the thickness of the tunica media.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1995.83.1.0111


Carotid endarterectomy performed after progressive carotid stenosis following angioplasty and stent placement

Carotid endarterectomy is the treatment of choice for asymptomatic and symptomatic disease with a greater stenosis of greater than 60%. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement has been investigated as a medical alternative for the treatment of ICA stenosis. Following PTA's stent placement, many questions remain unanswered regarding the physiological and biological changes that occur in the carotid vessel wall wall.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1997.87.6.0940


Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement for recurrent carotid artery stenosis

Following endarterectomy, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement have recently been suggested as an alternative to surgical reexploration in patients with recurrent carotid artery stenosis. After doing 25 procedures in 21 patients to determine the safety and effectiveness of PTA with or without stent placement for carotid artery restenosis, the authors retrospectively reviewed their experiences. PTA alone treated five arteries in five patients. No neurological abnormalities ipsilateral to the treated artery had occurred in the 16 patients who each underwent at least 6 months of follow-up study, nor in the 16 patients who underwent at least six months of follow-up examination. In two patients, three of five patients who underwent PTA alone developed significant asymptomatic restenoses that required repeat angioplasty in one and PTA with stent placement.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1999.90.4.0688

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* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions