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Carolina Coastal Plain - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 06 August 2022

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Bi-criteria evaluation of the MIKE SHE model for a forested watershed on the South Carolina coastal plain

The streamflow and water table depth were particularly sensitive to most of the model input parameters, especially to surface detention storage, drainage depth, soil hydraulic properties, plant rooting depth, and surface roughness, according to the model's calibration and validation results. Moreover, the bi-criteria technique used for distributed model calibration and validation was shown to be more effective than the single-criterion in finding the right model input parameters, especially for those parameters that were limited to particular circumstances. Model calibration using the bi-criteria method may be more cost-effective in terms of modeling uncertainty bounds of model inputs to model the hydrology of these types of forested watersheds. In coastal plain watersheds, MIKE SHE has been a good candidate for simulating streamflow and water table depth.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-14-1033-2010


Characterization of shear wave velocity profiles for South Carolina Coastal Plain

The Atlantic Coastal Plain is a geological feature along the east coast of the United States that consists of unconsolidated sediments as thick as 1000 m underlain by a slew of shear wave velocity, with a V s of over 2600 m/s. This very hard rock layer in South Carolina is found close to or on the ground surface in the state's central area and increases in depth toward the coast, from north to south. This paper compares field testing findings from different methods and visual classification of soil and rock samples to assess uncertainty of deep soil profiles obtained by various methods. The shear wave velocities measured in the lab for soil and rock samples were compared to field measurements' findings.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3934/geosci.2019.2.303


Natural Infrastructure Practices as Potential Flood Storage and Reduction for Farms and Rural Communities in the North Carolina Coastal Plain

These steps may help rural farm and forest lands to store runoff and minimize flooding on farms and downstream areas, as well as lower flooding, which would supplement traditional farm incomes. For the Coastal Plains of North Carolina, we mapped and summarized potential flood mitigation strategies. These include agricultural methods such as cover cropping/no-till farming; hardpan; pine or hardwood afforestation; and agroforestry; and stream channel restoration; and the construction of new structural solutions for dry dams and berms and water retention; agricultural practices of cover cropping/no-till farming; hardpan breakup; pine or hardwood afforestation; and agroforestry. A combination of techniques at the farm and landscape level can be used for floodwater retention and attenuation and damage reduction, as well as providing additional farm and forest ecosystem services.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169309


Climate Variability and Its Impact on Forest Hydrology on South Carolina Coastal Plain, USA

Understanding the changes in the hydrology of coastal forested wetlands that have been affected by climate change is vital for designing plans to maintain their operations and services. Both observation and simulation results for the paired forested watershed systems showed that the forest hydrology was extremely susceptible to change due to climate change. The findings also showed that hurricanes had a significant effect on forest hydrological patterns for a short time period as a result of forest fire damage.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos2030330


Enhanced terrestrial runoff during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 on the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA

During the Cenomanianu2013Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 2), a global increase in the strength of the hydrologic cycle sparked an increase in the flux of terrigenous sediments into the ocean, leading to an increase in the flux of terrigenous sediments into the ocean, prompting nutrients enrichment and therefore organic carbon burial. Here, we feature two recent OAE2 data from North Carolina, USA's Atlantic Coastal Plain, which is characterized by calcareous nannoplankton biostratigraphy and organic carbon isotopes. During the brief increase in carbon isotope values known as the Plenus carbon isotope hike, Terrigenous flux decreased; during the brief increase in carbon isotope rises known as the Plenus carbon isotope rise, it then increased and remained unchanged through the second part of OAE2. The inner shelf has relatively low organic carbon burial, in comparison to the open ocean's black shales. Organic carbon content on the shelf appears to grow in the offshore direction, underscoring the need for cores from the middle and outer shelf.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-1227-2021


Comparison of Nitrogen Treatment by Four Onsite Wastewater Systems in Nutrient-Sensitive Watersheds of the North Carolina Coastal Plain

If not properly handled, wastewater can be a contributor of nitrogen to groundwater and surface waters. About half of the population of North Carolina are used for wastewater treatment, but most OWSs are not regularly monitored. N contributions from OWSs to water resources are lacking detail. N levels in groundwater were measured in the form of fertilizer and wastewater concentrations, and the systems' N treatment effectiveness was determined by using groundwater wells near their drainfield trenches. Pressure dosing was used by the two OWSs, while two OWSs used gravity dispersing. The mean N treatment effectiveness of the four OWSs was 77%. In lowering N concentrations, the latest OWSs were more effective relative to the older OWSs at reducing N concentrations. When pooling results for the pressure dosed and gravity OWSs, similar N treatment efficiencies were discovered.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/nitrogen2020018

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions