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Carnivore - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Plastic ingestion by carnivore fish in a neotropical floodplain: seasonal and interspecific variations

Freshwater ecosystems are polluted in a similar manner to marine ecosystems, according to some studies; however, there are several unknown gaps to be filled in this area. Plastics were consumed by carnivore fishes in a Neotropical floodplain, and whether it was connected to seasonality. We also investigated the relationship between each species of plastic and the fish species. We analyzed the digestive contents of 23 species of diets and determined the presence and number of plastic particles. To determine the connection between each type of plastic and the fish species, we conducted a correspondence analysis with plastic samples. Plastics ingested with seasonality are also analyzed using linear regression techniques to determine the correlations of occurrence and number of plastics ingested with seasonality. Plastics had a positive relationship with the wet season, according to the number of plastics, the event did not show a strong relationship with any season.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-023-25135-0


Novel polyomaviruses identified in fecal samples from four carnivore species

Although primate and rodent polyomaviruses are increasingly well understood, less is known about polyomaviruses that infect other mammals. Six new polyomavirus genomes were discovered using a viral metagenomic strategy. These included a putative rabbit polyomavirus from a bobcat fecal sample as well as two potential deer-trophic polyomaviruses from Canada lynx feces. One polyomavirus isolated in a grizzly bear sample was found to be phylogenetically distant from previously identified polyomaviruses. According to further review, the grizzly bear fecal sample revealed that it contained anelloviruses that are known to infect pigs, implying that the bear may have preyed on a wild or domestic pig. Interestingly, a polyomavirus genome isolated in a puma fecal sample was found to be closely related both to raccoon polyomavirus and to Lyon-IARC polyomavirus, the latter of which was first detected in human saliva and skin swab samples, but has since been found in samples from domestic cats.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00705-022-05675-5


Habitat structure and the presence of large carnivores shape the site use of an understudied small carnivore: caracal ecology in a miombo woodland

We use camera trap data from Kasungu National Park, Malawi, to provide new insight on caracal habitat use in a miombo woodland and compare the spatiotemporal dynamics between caracal and members of the large carnivore guilds. In areas of lower spotted hyaena supply and caracal that showed irregular temporal activity patterns to spotted hyaena, usage in Caracal increased. spotted hyaena abundance and caracal also showed different temporal activity patterns to spotted hyaena. Our report gives us an insight into caracal ecology in a Miombo woodland and improves our understanding of community dynamics among a lesser-studied small carnivore and the large carnivore guild.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13364-022-00655-1


Reducing identification errors of African carnivores from photographs through computer-assisted workflow

Pattern recognition algorithms have been developed to support identification efforts, and here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology in reducing misidentifications of African large carnivores in historic data. The African Carnivore Wildbook, a 7-year camera-trapping data from north-central Namibia and updated cheetah and leopard individuals identified by human observers using a pattern recognition algorithm called HotSpotter, which was published in a web-based and open-source application. ACW verification showed a decline in 43 to 44 cheetah people and from 59 to 46 leopards.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13364-022-00657-z


Competitive interactions with dominant carnivores affect carrion acquisition of striped hyena in a semi-arid landscape of Rajasthan, India

We examined the competitive interactions between large carnivores and a social group foraging mesocarnivores as a result of their carrion purchase in Rajasthan, India, with special emphasis on striped hyenasu2019 carrion acquisition in the semi-arid region of Rajasthan, India. Camera traps were used at 14 carcass sites from 2020 to 2022, covering three key aspects of scavenging behaviour. The tigers were the most common scavengers that monopolize carrion production and reduce consumption time, reducing consumption time, and thus diet, of striped hyenas and other carnivorous scavengers, according to Our reports. However, leopards and striped hyenas had no negative interactions at carcasses, although both jackals and striped hyenas had no detrimental effects on each other's carrion purchase by jackals, and jackals had no impact on jackals' acquisition by jackals, as a result, and jackals had no effect on the mean feeding bout duration of striped hyenas.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13364-022-00663-1

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions