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Carnivore - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Habitat structure and the presence of large carnivores shape the site use of an understudied small carnivore: caracal ecology in a miombo woodland

We use camera trap data from Kasungu National Park, Malawi, to give new insight on caracal habitat use in a miombo woodland and compare the spatiotemporal patterns between caracal and members of the large carnivore guild. The use of spotted hyaena in areas with lower spotted hyaena production and caracal in areas with less spotted hyaena abundance and caracal displayed inconsistent temporal disturbance patterns to spotted hyaena. Our research provides insight into caracal ecology in a Miombo woodland and improves our knowledge of community dynamics between a lesser-studied small carnivore and the large carnivore guild.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13364-022-00655-1


The Respiratory System of the Arctocephalus australis in Comparison to the Dog as a Land-Carnivore: Are There Adaptations to Marine Life?

The present research focuses on the South American fur seal, or Arctocephalus australis, a carnivore included in the pinnipeds group. We investigated whether the anatomical characteristics of the Arctocephalus australisu2019 respiratory system are similar to those of other land-carnivores or whether these individuals have anatomical variations related to their ability to dive or their breath-holding capacities. We analyzed 11 cadavers of Arctocephalus australis, which included adult and juvenile individuals, by anatomically dissecting their isolated whole respiratory system.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13020199


Evaluating the responses of a territorial solitary carnivore to potential mates and competitors

Both male and female visitors' visitation rates and communication habits in reaction to either male or female visitors' arrivals were most illustrated by the combination of visitation by both competitors and potential mates. After visiting a female's return to scent marking areas more quickly and increased their rate of flehmen response after a females' visit, although males' rates of visitation and duration of visits increased in reaction to other males.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep27257


Global priorities for national carnivore conservation under land use change

Abstract Mammalian carnivores have experienced the most significant range decline of all wildlife, and they are especially vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. We then assessed the dangers to carnivore conservation in each region that contributes to global carnivore conservation. Land use change, according to We found that land use change could lead to significant range losses, particularly amongst already endangered carnivore species. In addition, the 17% of land under Aichi Target 11 was discovered to be ineffective to conserve carnivores under anticipated land use change. Our findings also show that land use changes could decrease the effectiveness of carnivores in protecting other endangered species, particularly threatened amphibians. Innovative measures are required to save carnivores in rural areas, complementing any proposed expansion of the protected area network, as meeting the global biodiversity target will be ineffective for carnivore care.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep23814


Human behaviour can trigger large carnivore attacks in developed countries

Although large carnivore populations are generally increasing in developed countries, increasing numbers are not solely responsible for the observed increase in the number of attacks by large carnivores. An increasing number of people are active in outdoor sports are engaged in outdoor sports, and, when doing so, some people engage in dangerous behaviour that may raise the chance of a dangerous encounter and a potential attack. Both potentially lethal human-carnivore encounters and their consequences on large carnivores are of utmost importance to minimize both potentially lethal human-carnivore encounters and their consequences to large carnivores.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep20552


Structural enrichment and enclosure use in an opportunistic carnivore: the red fox (Vulpes vulpes)

Abstract An increasing number of zoos keep their animals in natural-looking enclosures, but it is often unclear if or not the species's environmental and environmental needs are being met. Captivity enrichment can be a key factor in connection with enclosure use for species that survive in the wild. We first looked at the effectiveness of structural enrichment in changing enclosure use in an opportunistic carnivore, the red fox. We built both long wooden and cover structures that mimic natural habitat in predetermined areas in a test enclosure. Four treatments were administered to a group of four foxes in location 1; architectural enrichment in location 2; and structural enrichment; and institutional enrichment in location 1; and site 1 re-enrichment. We compared the use of sectors with cover or elongated buildings with that of similar sectors without buildings in a new outdoor enclosure.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0962728600001871


A carnivore species (Canis familiaris) expresses circadian melatonin rhythm in the peripheral blood and melatonin receptors in the brain

M, Lucini V, M. Lucini B, Mu00f8ller, M, Lucini V, Capsoni S, Fraschini F. A carnivore species demonstrates circadian rhythm in the peripheral blood and melatonin receptors in the brain. A distinctive diurnal rhythm in the peripheral blood was demonstrated by dogs kept under controlled photoperiodic conditions of 12 h light and 12 h dark, with a fast peak restricted to the late portion of the scotophase. In the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland, the highest density of high-affinity, G-protein-linked 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites was discovered. Binding sites were also found in the pars distalis, and light microscopy/high-resolution autoradiography revealed that binding was exclusive to the chromophobe and basophilic cells forming the adenopituitary zona tuberalis, which was well developed in this species, and expanding into the gland as a continuation of pars tuberalis. Cords of basophilic cells cultured in the pars distalis proper also had a high receptor density. The apparent melatonin inhibitory constant in all those areas was around 0. 1 nmol/l, which is a physiologically appropriate number considering the relative blood melatonin levels. The specific binding strength observed in other places was very poor, diffuse, and could not be traced to a single layer; the apparent ic 50 for melatonin was about 1 bcmol/l; co-incubation with GTP u0393 S did not alter the binding density. These results, taken together, show that the dog meets all the requirements for a fast network adapted to photoperiodic time measurements.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1530/eje.0.1310191


Estimating carnivore community structures

Abstract: Because of their ecological positions, ecosystem services, and impacts on biodiversity conservation, finding accurate measurements of carnivore communities is of utmost importance, but they are still scarce. This information is vital for carnivore management: to raise the ability for and acceptance of management decisions and policies, it is vital that those decisions are informed by reliable and quality data. The terrestrial carnivore community was dominated by red foxes, feral cats, and stone martens were similar in our Mediterranean study system, whereas badgers and common genets were the least common ; in our Mediterranean study scheme, Egyptian mongooses, feral cats, and stone martens were all abundant; Egyptian mongooses, feral cats, and stone martens were also abundant; Egyptian mongooses, feral cats, and stone martens.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep41036


Windscapes and olfactory foraging in a large carnivore

Abstract The most successful olfactory research tactic is to go cross-wind. In an attempt to determine the olfactory search for prey, we examined satellite-linked telemetry movement data of adult female polar bears from Hudson Bay, Canada, in connection with modelled winds. Migration during the sea ice freeze-up and break-up was also linked to wind. Our results are the first quantitative account of anemotaxis, with a preference to wind, for cross-wind search in a large carnivore. When evaluating what is considered suitable habitat, we recommend windscapes be included as a habitat feature in habitat selection models for olfactory animals.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep46332

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions