Advanced searches left 3/3

Caries Prevention - Springer Nature

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 15 September 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

The environmental impact of community caries prevention - part 3: water fluoridation

This paper identifies water fluoridation's environmental impact and compares it to results from part one and part two. This paper discusses how sustainability results can be used alongside clinical and cost effectiveness to help make decisions about prevention at a population level. Introduction Fluoride varnish in schools, supervised toothbrushing in kindergarten, toothbrush and toothpaste manufacturing, and water fluoridation are among the recommendations in community-level efforts to reduce dental caries in children. Materials and methods A comparative life cycle investigation was conducted to determine the social effects of fluoridation of the public water supply for a five-year-old child over a one-year period. Results When comparing community-level caries prevention services, water fluoridation had the lowest environmental impact in all 16 categories and had the least impact on disability-adjusted life years. In this LCA study in all measures of environmental sustainability, water fluoridation did well.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41415-022-4251-5


The environmental impact of community caries prevention - part 1: fluoride varnish application

Materials and methods A comparative life cycle analysis was carried out to determine the environmental consequences of a five-year-old child receiving two FV applications in a one-year span in schools and dental practice. FV applications in schools had the lowest environmental impact in all 16 categories, followed by FV application in dental practices during an existing appointment. The patient traveller journey into dental practice was the most notable effect in all categories, with the majority of the change resulting from the patient travel into dental practice. The most cost-effective way to provide FV is to apply Discussion FV while a child is still attending dental services. School FV programs are a cost-effective, equitable way to reach all children who do not have access to routine dental services. This paper discusses the environmental consequences of fluoride varnish use in children.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41415-022-4901-7


The environmental impact of community caries prevention - part 2: toothbrushing programmes

This paper examines the environmental impact of two toothbrush-based programs, including supervised toothbrushing in kindergarten and the supply of toothbrushes and toothpaste for use at home. Methods and techniques A comparative life cycle analysis was undertaken to determine the environmental impact of a five-year-old boy on one of two toothbrushing schemes over a one-year period; supervised toothbrushing in school; or the supply of toothbrushes and toothpaste. In both 16 impact groups tested, the fastest whitening toothbrushing had a lower environmental impact than toothbrushes and toothpaste. Discussion of Caries Prevention Services All community-level caries prevention services have an associated environmental price. LCA is one way to quantify the environmental impact of healthcare services, and it can be used alongside cost and clinical effectiveness data to inform public healthcare policy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41415-022-4905-3

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions