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Caribbean Coral Reefs - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 06 August 2022

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Sponge communities on Caribbean coral reefs are structured by factors that are top-down, not bottom-up.

The demise of reef-building corals has changed Caribbean coral reefs in the last two decades, with the death of reef-building corals and sponges now the most common habitat-forming organisms on most reefs. According to competing hypotheses, sponge populations are primarily controlled by predatory fishes or by the availability of picoplankton to suspension-feeding sponges. However, there was nonetheless a strong effect of predation by fishes on sponge species that did not have chemical defenses. Surveys of the benthic community on Conch Reef did not endorse a bottom-up effect, with more sponge covers at the shallower depth. The main feature of sponge coral reefs in the Caribbean coral reefs is mainly top-down, and we predict that sponge killers' removal by overfishing would shift communities into faster-growing, undefended species that better compete for space with endangered reef-building corals.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0062573


Impacts of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering strategy on Caribbean coral reefs

coral reefs in the harbor off the coast of one-third of all identified marine species are the world's most fragile ecosystem to climate change, according to the marine reefs. This research shows that stratospheric aerosol geoengineering could greatly reduce future coral bleaching in the Caribbean Sea, as well as sea level rise and sea surface temperature; although geoengineering may prolong the return period of future hurricanes, coral reef restoration and survival after hurricane damage, this may still be too short to guarantee coral recruitment and survival after hurricane damage.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-05-2017-0104


A biological condition gradient for Caribbean coral reefs: Part II. Numeric rules using sessile benthic organisms

The Biological Condition Gradient is a scientific model used to describe incremental biological changes in biological health as a result of increasing anthropogenic strain. As coral reefs in the United States fade globally, scientists and researchers are focusing on how to maintain the vital structure and functions, as well as the benefits that healthy coral reef ecosystems provide for many economies and societies. Numeric decision rules were developed by an expert panel for scleractinian corals and other benthic assemblages with multiple attributes to use in shallow-water coral reefs with depths greater than 30 meters. The numeric model used decision rules based on metrics used to measure coral reef health. The numeric BCG model predicted the panel's median site ratings for 84% of the test sites and 89% of independent validation sites, according to model confirmation, who showed that the numeric BCG model predicted the panel's median site ratings for 84% of the panel's median site ratings for 84% of the models used to calibrate the model and 89% of independent validation sites.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2022.108576


The rise of a native sun coral species on southern Caribbean coral reefs

Abstract On Curau00e7ao, a previously rare sun coral species is increasing in abundance within shallow coral communities on a general decline of Caribbean reef corals. However, C. manuelensis was only present on deeper reef sections of Caribbean reefs earlier than T. coccinea. The finding that deep reef sections can harbor species capable of colonizing shallower reef zones highlights the importance of detailed inventories of reef communities around large depth ranges, which can help us distinguish between species increases of native species and invasive species arrivals.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.2942


Octocoral Species Assembly and Coexistence in Caribbean Coral Reefs.

BACKGROUND: What are the determinant factors of community assemblies in the ocean's most diverse ecosystem? Coral reefs can be divided in continental and oceanic ; whether or not these habitat differences result in community-wide ecological divergence or species exclusion/coexistence with evolutionary implications is uncertain. METHODS: We determined the phylogenetic community association structure in a coral reef community by studying Caribbean octocorals as a model system, focusing on species coexistence and environmental feedbacks. RESULTS: The results of phylogenetic overdispersion of continental reefs resemble clusters of oceanic reefs, according to phylogenetic inferences. In addition, atolls and barrier reefs had the most species diversity, while reef bank phylogenetic diversity was higher. Specifically, the discriminant component analysis supported this distinction between oceanic and continental reefs, where continental octocoral species have wider calyx apertures, thicker branches, prominent calyces, and azooxanthellate species.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129609


Functional developmental states of the Greater Caribbean coral reefs

Trophic interactions can contribute to a better understanding of coral reef FDS that can be related to their geomorphological structure; however, the number of the states is currently unknown. In addition, we investigated the geomorphology of a group of the Greater Caribbean coral reefs, defining coral reef FDS gradients. Eleven coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico and 17 reefs in the Caribbean Sea were investigated, including fringing reefs and platform reefs. Nine ecosystem developmental characteristics and five topological indices were estimated for each coral reef by trophic models, with nine coral reefs having nine ecosystem evolutionary characteristics and five topological indices. The early states correspond to fringing reefs in the Mexican Caribbean, while later states correspond to emerging platform reefs without and in sandy-island cay. In a partial redundancy analysis, we found that energy flow control increases with age and degree of geomorphological and physical structural complexity, as using topological indices as variables and the eight FDS as nominal variables.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2020.107170


Distribution and structure of the southernmost Caribbean coral reefs: golfo de Urabá, Colombia

The Gulf of Urabu00e1 is the southernmost portion of the Caribbean Sea's southernmost part. Water conditions in the area are far from optimal for coral formation and development due to the large amounts of sediment and freshwater released by the Atrato river and several minor streams. Four coral assemblages were found at the 12 sample locations: Diploria strigosa, crustose algae, Siderastrea siderea, Agaricia spp. , and mixed large corals. During reconnaissance dives, reconnaissance dives revealed two assemblages, dominated respectively by Millepora complanata and thickets of Acropora palmata. In a SE-NW direction, reef growth, coral formation, and live coral cover rise along the coast, with a notable peak near to the cove of Sapzurro, indicating an overall change in coral growth and settlement in that direction. During the survey, a total of 33 species of hard corals were identified.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3989/scimar.2000.64n3327


Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on Caribbean coral reefs.

Coral reefs around the world are being impacted by cyanobacterial mats from Benthic cyanobacterial mats. We carried out a multi-year survey on the Caribbean island of Cura-u00e7ao, which revealed the highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs near to urbanized areas. Reefs with high BCM content were also characterized by heavy benthic coverage of macroalgae and sparse corals. Both high and low BCM coverage indicated that BCM growth is boosted by a localised, substrate-linked delivery of nutrients from organic matter degradation by microbial degradation. BCMs increased organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and an in situ experiment that showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter. To reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs, improved soil irrigation could lead to reduced organic loading of sediments and other benthos.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0125445

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions