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Cardiovascular Health - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 10 September 2022

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Community-Based Participatory Research to Improve Cardiovascular Health Among US Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups

Purpose of Study This paper seeks to evaluate the latest community-based participatory research findings aimed at improving the cardiovascular health of racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States, which have a higher incidence of cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic determinants of health. CBPR investigators' future directions include continuing to explore the existing body of evidence through more comprehensive studies, scaling effective interventions, and translating CBPR findings to better address health inequalities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40471-022-00298-5


HIV and Global Cardiovascular Health

Purpose of Study Because of a drug-based combination antiretroviral therapy, people living with HIV are living longer, people with HIV are also living longer, but people with chronic age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, are the leading cause of death worldwide, although chronic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. PLWH are at a greater risk of CVD at younger ages than those without HIV, according to new studies. In addition, geographical location affects risk factor variation, which includes non-traditional CVD risk factors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11886-022-01741-1


Exercise training maintains cardiovascular health: signaling pathways involved and potential therapeutics

Exercise regimens have long been touted as a healthy lifestyle as well as a cost-effective non-drug therapeutic approach for cardiovascular disease. Functional and mechanistic studies that use animal exercise technology, as well as observational and interventional cohort studies with human participants have all played a role in delineating the primary signaling pathways by which exercise promotes cardiovascular fitness and wellbeing. The signaling molecules that are essential for exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy have the ability to reduce cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate cardiac remodeling. Besides the cross talk between the heart and other organs during exercise, we also explore multiple variables that influence exercise's results and emphasize the need and desire for further research into exercise-regulated molecules as therapeutic goals and biomarkers for CVD.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41392-022-01153-1


Improving Maternal Cardiovascular Health in Underserved Populations: a Narrative Review of Behavioral Intervention Trials Targeting Postpartum Weight Retention

Purpose of Investigation Essay The goal of study is to investigate why people who are economically marginalized and socioeconomically poor people are more likely to experience increased postpartum weight retention, which has been attributed to cardiovascular disease development. This essay reviews new research on behavioral strategies aimed at these populations to increase postpartum weight retention. Both interventions used the Social Cognitive Theory and a general behavior change focusing on diet and physical fitness focused on diet and physical fitness.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-022-01045-3


Transgender Cardiovascular Health: Practical Management for the Clinician

Transgender people make up a significant share of our population, according to new estimates, clinicians will be treating more transgender patients in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. Transgender individuals are at a greater risk of cardiovascular diseases than their cisgender peers, according to recent reports. Detailed Review While it is likely that both safe and appropriate guidelines on transgender men and women's health are both safe and appropriate, physicians should consider additional factors in risk assessment and treatment of specific aspects of care at every visit.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-022-01047-1


Improved cardiovascular health by supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10: applying structural equation modelling (SEM) to clinical outcomes and biomarkers to explore underlying mechanisms in a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled intervention project in Sweden

Purpose Selenium and coenzyme Q10 have synergistic antioxidant properties. In a four-year supplement trial in elderly Swedes with a poor selenium status, we found improved cardiac function, less cardiac wall tension, and reduced cardiovascular mortality up to 12 years of follow-up. Methods Selenium yeast and coenzyme Q10, or placebo, was given to 443 elderly people in a 48-month cycle. Conclusions In addition to positive clinical outcomes, selenium and coenzyme Q10 treatment was also associated with beneficial cardiovascular risk biomarkers. We discovered that the weights of the first-order factors inflammation and oxidative stress were elevated, forming a second-order factor inflammation/oxidative stress, which was also influencing the causes, fibrosis, and myocardium. These results reduced fibrosis and improved myocardial function, according to the SEM report, highlighting the importance of supplementation in those low on selenium and coenzyme Q10.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-022-02876-1


A review and assessment of cyanobacterial toxins as cardiovascular health hazards

Cyanotoxins can cause adverse health problems in a multitude of organisms where the toxins may be directed to the liver, other internal organs, mucous surfaces, and the skin and nervous system. More than 100 studies on cyanotoxins and related topics were reviewed for this article. The majority of the studies was conducted on rodents and fish in high, acutely toxin concentrations and unnatural exposure routes, and it has been therefore clear that future studies should be focused on oral, chronic exposure of mammalian species at environmentally safe levels. Given the available details, it is likely that cyanotoxins do not pose a significant risk to cardiovascular health under normal circumstances encountered in daily life, which is not surprising. In addition to dangers related to unusually high cyanotoxins and atypical exposure routes, chronic exposure of co-existing conditions may make some of the cyanotoxins more harmful to cardiovascular health.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00204-022-03354-7


Perinatal Metal and Metalloid Exposures and Offspring Cardiovascular Health Risk

Purpose of Study Chemical metal exposures have been attributed to cardiovascular disease in adults, but new studies have shown that metal exposures can also adversely influence cardiovascular phenotypes in childhood and adolescence. Latest findings We summarized 17 new studies that looked at the effects of perinatal metal exposures on measures of cardiovascular health in children. Accumulating evidence points to the possibility of perinatal Pb exposure on BP in children. Abstract The following is a summary of the main point that remains is whether or not perinatal metals exposure influenced cardiovascular health into adulthood. Future studies longitudinally investigating cardiovascular outcomes may help determine the effect of perinatal metals exposure on long-term health and if interventions, which reduce metals exposures during this critical developmental window, may have a positive effect on disease progression.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40572-022-00377-1


Cardiovascular health in the menopause transition: a longitudinal study of up to 3892 women with up to four repeated measures of risk factors

Background women experience adverse shifts in cardiovascular health in mid-life; whether the menopausal transition influenced these changes is largely debated. This research was conducted to investigate relationships of reproductive age with change in carotid intima media thickness and cardiovascular risk factors, as well as the role of chronological and reproductive age. Methods We used results from 1702 women from a pregnancy-based UK cohort who underwent up to four repeat cardiovascular health screening tests between mean age 51 and 56 years and experienced a natural menopause. In addition, we investigated the correlation between cardiovascular fitness measures by chronological age as a result of menopausal stages using data from women who had and had not experienced menopause. Conclusions Our findings show that going through the menopausal transition does not raise women's risk of atherosclerosis related to ageing, not more.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-022-02454-6

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions