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Cardiac Catheterization - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 10 September 2022

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Severe Complications after General Anesthesia versus Sedation during Pediatric Diagnostic Cardiac Catheterization for Ventricular Septal Defect

This paper was designed to compare the incidence of severe complications in pediatric diagnostic cardiac catheterization for ventricular septal defect in general anesthesia and sedation in general anesthesia and sedation in two research settings. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients with ventricular septal defect treatment between July 2010 and March 2019. We used the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database to search pediatric patients with ventricular septal defect diagnosis. The percentage of patients with serious complications in the general anesthesia group was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group following adjustment than in the sedation group. To determine the safety and reliability of pediatric diagnostic cardiac catheterization, further research on anesthetic techniques is required.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11175165


Vascular Complications of Transradial Access for Cardiac Catheterization

It is important for operators to anticipate potential vascular problems associated with radial artery access. This paper aims to raise the threat of transvascular access vascular problems. Intrarterial verapamil and/or nitroglycerine are used to treat Radial artery spasms. To prevent radial artery occlusion, patent hemostasis and adequate anticoagulation are used. Hand ischemia is a rare complication not related to abnormal results of the Allen or Barbeau test, and it can be treated with intra-arterial verapamil, IV heparin, and IV diltiazem.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/usc.2020.23


Cardiac Catheterization versus Echocardiography for Monitoring Pulmonary Pressure: A Prospective Study in Patients with Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Standard echocardiography is vital for pulmonary arterial hypertension testing in patients with connective tissue disease, but pah diagnosis and monitoring require cardiac catheterization. The invasive baseline pulmonary artery systolic pressure was 60. 19 mmHg; at u00b1 2. 95WU. Patients underwent hemodynamic and echocardiography follow-up after 9. 47 u00b1 7. 29 months; 27 patients underwent a third follow-up after 17. 2 u00b1 7. 4 months from baseline; 29 patients underwent hemodynamic and echocardiographic follow-up after 9. 47 u00b1 7. 4 months; 27 patients underwent a third follow-up after 9. 47 u00b1 7. 4 months from baseline; 27 patients underwent a third follow-up By simultaneous echocardiography, we investigated whether clinically relevant hemodynamic decline of follow-up catheterization-derived PASP could be predicted by simultaneous echocardiography. In recent catheterization studies, a successful echocardiographic prediction correlated only with higher PVR in multivariate analysis. Specifically, echocardiography in patients with baseline PVR > 5. 45 WU had both sensitivity and positive predictive values of 73%, as well as both specificity and negative predictive value of 91% for detecting hemodynamic PASP deterioration. With high specificity and low predictive value, selected patients with CTD-PAH echocardiography can predict PASP deterioration.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10010049


The role of traditional obesity parameters in predicting the number of stenosed coronary arteries (≥ 60%) among patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

Abstract In the literature, the association between obesity and coronary artery disease has been well documented. Traditional obesity measures such as waist measurement, waist measurement, waist circumference, and hip circumference are all standard obesity measures used to determine obesity. Body mass index, waist measurement, waist measurement, waist circumference, and hip circumference are all standard obesity measures used to analyze obesity. This research sought to determine the role of these common obesity measures in determining the number of stenosed coronary arteries in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In two hospitals in Jordan, a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 hospitalized patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Hip circumference was rated as the best predictor of CAD, with the highest cut-off value of 103 cm. Hip circumference had significant declines with the number of stented coronary arteries and the number of severe stenosed coronary arteries. The number of stented coronary arteries were shown by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and smoking, which had significant positive correlations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-17517-0


Late Outcomes of Patients With Prehospital ST‐Segment Elevation and Appropriate Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Nonactivation

Patients with suspected STu2013erocardial infarction and cardiac catheterization laboratory nonactivation or cancellation have reported similar crude and high risk of death compared to those with CCL activation, although the reason for these poor results are unclear. Patients with prehospital ECG STEMI citations who had CCLu2010NA versus those with CCL activation were found late clinical results among patients with CCLu2010NA. There were 569 CCL activations and 464 CCLu2010NAs among the 1033 included ECG broadcasts. Patients who had CCLu2010NA had a greater risk of allu2010cause death in patients with CCLu2010NA than CCL activation, largely due to an excess in noncardiovascular deaths. There was no significant difference in the adjusted risk for cardiovascular disease/MI/stroke between the two groups compared to the previous ones. These patients had shorter late outcomes than CCL patients with CCL activation, mainly because of higher rates of noncardiovascular deaths.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.121.025602

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions