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Carbon Storage - OSTI GOV

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Last Updated: 10 November 2022

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Integrated Mid-Continent Stacked Carbon Storage Hub Project Phase II Final Summary Report

The Phase II Integrated Midcontinent Stacked Carbon Storage Hub, developed by the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, is part of the Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise. In Phase II of commercial CCUS feasibility, three locations within the IMSCS-HUB stacked storage corridor were evaluated: one in southwest Nebraska, Sleepy Hollow Field, a second in southwestern Nebraska near Madrid, and another in southwestern Kansas, the Patterson Site. The team in Phase II investigated the potential storage complexes at the potential storage sites in Nebraska and Kansas in order to create a commercial-scale storage hub that integrates proven CO 2 capture technology and transportation from nearby ethanol sources. The Project Team has identified a concrete plan to achieve DOE's 2025 target of commercial carbon capture and storage development by building a CO2 market and infrastructure that depends on several ethanol-based CO 2 sources in the short run, as well as the incorporation of multiple coal-fired power plant CO 2 sources when commercial capture is economically viable, based on lessons learned from the DOE-NETL Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' findings. Through 17 distinct storage areas, the regional storage resource characterization provided a major opportunity for commercial-scale projects in the IMSCS-HUB storage corridor with 577. 4 Mt of stacked CO 2 storage capacity and the ability to produce 181. 9 MMbls of oil via EOR across 17 individual storage regions.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1765826


Fiber optic system for direct detection of CO2 leakage in carbon storage wells

The feasibility study focused on the production of a new fiber for distributed chemical sensing that would allow for real detection of CO 2 leakages in the environment. To alert of an incoming well leak and potential CO 2 leakage through it, it is especially critical for monitoring well integrity for carbon capture and storage.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1827504


Management and dewatering of brines extracted from geologic carbon storage sites

Subsurface pressure management is a significant obstacle to geologic CO 2 storage. The removal of brine from saline formations prior or during CO2 injection can be controlled by brine removal; however, extracted brines are non-trivial because they may contain high amounts of dissolved solids and other contaminants. Dewatering a brine will reduce the volume that must be removed; in addition, water extracted from the brine can be a source of usable low salinity water. If appropriate, the similarities and the differences between dewatering brines manufactured from oil/gas production and brines extracted from geologic CO 2 storage are also shown herein.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1480847


Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation

Previously published results from 625 paired soil samples were used to predict carbon in cultivated soil as a function of initial carbon content. The highest rates of change occurred in the first 20 years of cultivation, according to regression studies of changes in carbon storage as a result of years of cultivation. In both tests, soils with a low amount of carbon tended to gain marginal amounts of carbon after cultivation, but soils with high in carbon lost at least 20% during cultivation.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1389524

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions