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Carbon Storage - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Storage of Hydrologically Altered Mangrove Wetlands in Puerto Rico after a Hurricane

Mangrove wetlands are vital ecosystems, but human growth and climate change threatens mangroves and their large carbon stores. In Catau00f1o, Jobos Bay, and Vieques, Puerto Rico, aboveground biomass measurements and belowground soil carbon measurements aid in hydrologically altered mangrove swamps with high, medium, and low disturbance. 0. 05 g-C cmu22123, the highest disturbed site belowground carbon mass averaged 0. 048 g-C cmu22123, which increased with increased aboveground biomass. Organic carbon mass at the low-disturbed location was consistent between all sites and inorganic carbon concentrations controlled total carbon mass, which averaged 0. 048 g-C cmu22123. Mangroves are adaptable and resilient, with the ability to maintain their carbon storage capacity despite hydrologic changes, according to these findings, although mass carbon storage within mangrove forests can be spatially variable under hydrologically altered conditions.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10091965


Self-sealing mafic sills for carbon and hydrogen storage

Abstract igneous intrusions in sedimentary basins and have the ability to be useful seals for fluids in geological storage scenarios, and they can be particularly relevant as the need for geological carbon sequestration and alternate fuel storage rises. In addition, geological H2 storage needs more rigorous conditions than those normally associated with oil and gas. Mineral sills from the Gettysburg Basin, Pennsylvania, have remarkably low permeability and homogeneous compositions that contain minerals that can easily react with CO 2 dissolved in water.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1144/sp528-2022-43


Analysis of Vertical Permeability and Its Influence on CO2 EOR and Storage in a Carbonate Reservoir

Abstract This paper aims to expand our knowledge of the geostatistics of vertical permeability and its influence on reservoir results during CO2 enhanced oil recovery and storage. However, our findings reveal that it is also critical to determine kz characteristics in order to accurately assess their influence on CO2 EOR and storage performance prediction. The study was conducted on about 9,000 whole-core triaxial permeability measurements from 42 wells in a San Andres carbonate reservoir. To investigate geological causes that coincided with large kz, we reviewed wells with the largest and smallest fractions of points with kz > max. However, modelers often assume that kz is less than kmax in traditional core data interpretation. The cumulative distribution functions of the well with the smallest fraction of cores where kz > kmax are different, and this coincides with the presence of stylolites. In several wells, we discovered that kz is about twice as variable as kx. We developed a series of flow simulation models that portrayed these geostatistical signatures of permeability, CO2 injection techniques, and reservoir heterogeneity in order to determine the influence of kz heterogeneity on CO2 flow, analysing kz realizations, flow regimes, CO2 injection procedures, and reservoir heterogeneity. Simulation results revealed that, for viscous flow, with variable kx similar to the reservoir and a constant kz/kx = 0. 1, yields a close cumulative oil production to the simulation case, with both kx and kz as uncorrelated variables.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2118/205995-ms

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions