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Carbon Footprint - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 04 September 2022

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Carbon Footprint and Energy Transformation Analysis of Steel Produced via a Direct Reduction Plant with an Integrated Electric Melting Unit

Nevertheless, the conversion of these DR plants into fully integrated metallurgical plants poses several difficulties. Despite the fact that the traditional blast furnaceu2014BOF route produces a surplus of electricity in the range of 0. 8 MJ/kg hot-rolled coil, this surplus quickly turns into a deficit of around 17 MJ/kg hot-rolled coil for a hydrogen-based direct reduction with an integrated electric melting unit. On the other hand, although the product carbon footprint of the blast furnace-related production route is 2. 1 kg CO_2eq/kg hot-rolled coil is reduced to 0. 76 kg CO_2eq/kg hot-rolled coil for the hydrogen-related route is reduced to 0. 76 kg CO_2eq/kg hot-rolled coil, provided that the electricity source is renewable energies, this footprint can be reduced to 0. 76 kg CO_2eq/kg hot-rolled coil for the hydrogen-related route for the hydrogen-related route is a Likewise, if the electricity input has a carbon footprint of the new German or European electricity grid mix, the total carbon footprint of the hot-rolled coil also rises to 3. 0 kg CO_2eq/kg hot-rolled coil.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40831-022-00585-x


Comparison of carbon footprint and water scarcity footprint of milk protein produced by cellular agriculture and the dairy industry

Purpose This paper investigates the carbon footprint and water scarcity of a milk protein, beta-lactoglobulin, produced by cellular agriculture and compares it to extracted dairy protein from milk. The objective of the investigation is to determine the role of microbially produced milk proteins in meeting future demand for more easily produced protein of high nutritional quality. Methods The evaluated process focuses on beta-lactoglobulin manufacture in bioreactor cultivation with filamentous fungi T. reesei and downstream processing for product purification. The carbon footprint and WSF simulations are compared to estimates and actual results on extracted dairy protein production in NZ. Results and analysis The carbon footprint of microbially produced protein varies depending on the location and source of carbon used. With sucrose-based manufacturing in NZ and Australia's highest with the glucose and chromatography step, the lowest carbon footprint was discovered. The avoided feed production had a greater effect on the WSF than on the carbon footprint. The milk protein results were of the same magnitude, c. 10 t CO_2e/t protein, and 290,300 m3 world eq. /t protein. Conclusions The environmental consequences of microbially produced milk protein were of the same magnitude as that of extracted dairy protein. When renewable energy and more sustainable carbon sources are used, as well as evolving knowledge and technologies in microbial production, the carbon footprints of proteins grown by cellular agriculture have the potential for significant reduction. In the same way, methane reduction techniques can potentially reduce the carbon footprint of milk proteins.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11367-022-02087-0


Co-benefits assessment of integrated livestock and cropland system based on emergy, carbon footprint and economic return

The rapid specialization of livestock raising has contributed to spatially decoupled crop and livestock raising. To encourage sustainable agriculture production, it has been suggested that relinking croplands and livestock to encourage the waste and by-product exchange be carried out. As the empirical evidence, this paper provided an emergy-LCA-based framework to investigate the GHG reduction and economic benefits of the integrated crop raising and livestock feeding schemes, as well as traditional citrus alfalfa intercropping-swine methods. The results showed that the three case modes would generally promote GHG mitigation and environmental and economic benefits. CAIS had the lowest carbon footprint per kcal product, followed by TS and MWRS. The significant difference in this indicator can be attributed to their diverse upstream input and manure control. CAIS had the highest success on emergy-based sustainability and economic benefits due to the reduced reliance on purchased resources.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-022-22598-5


Inter-annual variation patterns in the carbon footprint of farmland ecosystems in Guangdong Province, China

Carbon sequestration in farmland ecosystems is a key link in the global carbon cycle and plays a key role in regional carbon reduction. Using carbon dioxide factors for agricultural inputs that are closer to the Chinese situation, carbon dioxide emissions, sequestration, and footprint of farmland ecosystems in Guangdong have been estimated. During the study period, carbon average emissions from farmland in Guangdong were 3. 7624 million t a u22121, with a balanced overall trend of change and nitrogen fertilizer applications being the primary contributor to carbon pollution. Botton farmland ecosystems saw an overall decline of 10. 32%, with an average annual carbon sink of 19. 033 million t au22121. The paper findings provide a theoretical basis for the development of carbon emission reduction schemes and industrial consolidation in Guangdong and provinces with the same industrial structure.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-18425-z


Yield advantage and carbon footprint of oat/sunflower relay strip intercropping depending on nitrogen fertilization

Methods A two-year field experiment was carried out to find the effect of oat/sunflower intercropping and N application rates on yield benefits, N uptake, and CF. Figures The overall land equivalent ratio of oat/sunflower intercropping decreased from 1. 33 to 1. 07 with rising N fertilization, which means crop yield can be maintained but crop yield should be maintained. While increasing N fertilization, the border rows provided more than a third of the intercropped oat without N fertilization, but their contribution decreased with increasing N fertilization. However, the contribution of border rows to the intercropped sunflower yield was independent of fertilization and stood at 69 percent to 67 percent. Overall, the oat/sunflower relay strip intercropping maximizes the efficiency due to reduced N fertilization requirements, which has reduced border row effects. Intercropping can be a win-win win for sustainable agriculture in Northwest China, with higher yield and reduced carbon footprint.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-022-05661-5


Examining the relationship between fiscal decentralization, renewable energy intensity, and carbon footprints in Canada by using the newly constructed bootstrap Fourier Granger causality test in quantile

In Canada, the nexus between fiscal decentralization, renewable energy intensity, and carbon footprints is explored in this paper. We test the sample causality against the distribution of the median causality across frequencies estimated for the procedure, which may reveal the misleading causal link in previous studies using only traditional Granger causality. respectively, our findings indicate a negative one-way Granger causality from fiscal decentralization to carbon footprints and renewable energy intensity to carbon footprints.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-022-22513-y


Assessing the carbon footprint of a Colombian University Campus using the UNE-ISO 14064–1 and WRI/WBCSD GHG Protocol Corporate Standard

The first step toward the proposed reduction targets at the local, national, and international levels is Therein, assessing greenhouse gas emissions from an educational institution. We present the first estimated carbon footprint estimation of emissions for the main urban campuses of Universidad Nacional de Medellu00edn's Medellu00edn, Medell, Colombia, using the UNE-ISO 14064. u20131 and the WRCSD GHG Protocol Corporate standard, corresponding to scope 1, scope 2, and scope 3 emissions for the first estimated carbon footprint calculations corresponding to scope 1, scope 2, scope 2, and scope 3 emissions for the first estimated carbon footprint The carbon footprint in 2019 was 7250. 52 tons CO_2 eq, with 0. 432 tons CO_2 eq per person. Scope 1 emissions accounted for about 2. 8 percent of the carbon footprint, while scope 2 and 3 emissions each contributed nearly 14% and 83%, respectively. For the local conditions' differences, it is not possible to extrapolate results from the Colombian case; therefore, solid conclusions on the CF behaviour in the Colombian HEIs is not feasible.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-022-22119-4

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions