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Carbon Footprint - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 04 October 2022

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Avoiding Food Wastage: The Net Impact of Maisto Bankas Activities. A Carbon Footprint Approach

This paper intends to assess the net environmental benefits of the Lithuanian Food Bank's carbon footprint in terms of carbon footprint. Food banks are charities that seek to minimize the negative socioeconomic consequences of food waste and food insecurity. They concentrate on food waste recovery, avoiding the transformation of a food surplus in food waste. The present paper reviewed the positive impact of the Lithuanian Food Bank's activities, as the non-impact of recovered food and the non-disposal of food in landfills, as the non-impact of recovered food and non-disposal of food in landfills.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2478/rtuect-2022-0019


Drivers for decoupling carbon footprint pressure from economic growth in China’s provinces

A significant obstacle to achieving Sustainable Development Goals is the growing disconnect between energy carbon dioxide pollution and vegetation carbon sequestration. The growing disconnect from economic growth needs a stringent and coordinated set of sustainable policies. To depict the disconnection state and trend of CFP and economic growth, a popular decoupling strategy was used, employing a carbon footprint pressure indicator to highlight the disparity. According to the reports, the CFP increased significantly in 26 provinces between 2006 and 2015. Our report found that increasing energy efficiency was the primary cause of absolute decoupling, while decreasing market share, and increasing carbon sequestration accelerated absolute decoupling. Given the limited future role of improving energy efficiency and vegetation carbon sequestration, it is imperative to optimize and upgrade the energy sector and economy's current climate risk.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geosus.2022.08.003


Food waste and associated carbon footprint: Evidence from Chinese universities

In recent years, there has been widespread concern regarding the carbon footprint of food waste, particularly in China, where China's food waste is increasing with economic growth. China has the world's largest scale of higher education, and the amount of food waste in university canteens is significant and cannot be ignored. This report aims to determine the carbon footprint of food waste at Chinese universities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1080/20964129.2022.2130094


Managing carbon footprint for a sustainable supply chain: a systematic literature review

Global warming is attributed to carbon dioxide emissions derived from industrial production and market consumption practices, which are the key contributors to global warming. Global action is being devised by the world's major countries to combat climate change and achieve a low-carbon future following the United Nations Paris Accord on climate change's ratification in 2016. Globalization is pushing companies not only to implement greener manufacturing techniques for reduced carbon footprint reduction, but also outside its boundaries. This paper and industry practices indicate that the connection between CFP and sustainable supply chain is unclear in the current literature and industry practices. U2013 Results: u2013 Most researchers predominance to environmental impact among the three pillars of sustainability for a healthy supply chain environment. Only a few researchers were able to address social responsibility and social responsibility. This review reveals how running a CFP is one of the key characteristics of sustainable growth. Actual company cases have been published in the field of CFP and sustainability. Supply chain sustainability has successfully reduced carbon dioxide in many key industries, including food, electricity, and petroleum. This report provides general information on how companies modified and redeveloped new techniques and technologies to make their supply chain more competitive. This article contains broad insights on how companies changed and redeveloped various techniques and technologies to make their supply chain more efficient. In this research, the strategic role of various carbon policies, environmental guidelines, and legislation in the area of CFP has also been identified. This article discusses the theoretical underlying causes of CFP management and helps companies and researchers develop a new series of strategies for dealing CFP and other sustainability issues.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1108/MSCRA-06-2020-0016


Carbon Footprint of Manufacturing Processes: Conventional vs. Non-Conventional

Carbon dioxide measurements are used to determine the carbon footprint and environmental impact of manufacturing processes in order to determine which steps can be further optimized and make processes more efficient and environmentally sustainable. To determine which is the most carbon intensive one, a previously published holistic approach to carbon footprint estimation was applied in both conventional and laser-based material removal techniques. For the case of laser-based grooving and conventional milling, the carbon footprint and environmental impact were calculated and the findings showed that conventional drilling was more carbon intensive than laser-based drilling, which was the opposite in the case of laser-based grooving and conventional milling. Following the Green Deal's selection of the most carbon free steps and processes, companies will be able to better plan production lines toward carbon freeness.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10091858


Building Sector Issues in about 100 Years: End-Of-Life Scenarios of Carbon-Reinforced Concrete Presented in the Context of a Life Cycle Assessment, Focusing the Carbon Footprint

To optimize the environmental performance of this material, the manufacturing of carbon fibers for CRC is highly dependent, prompting the need to investigate circular economy techniques to optimize the material's environmental performance. This report aims to model EoL options within a Life Cycle Assessment, focusing on the EoL stage based on ISO 14040/44 using the GaBi ts 10. 5. 1. 124 software and the CML2001 method. In quantitative terms, this LCA states that the EoL can have significant effects on the climate, and that, in addition, this LCA outlines first steps for the future of the building industry in quantitative terms. The GWP was the primary catalyst of the GWP's demolition and separation of both the concrete and carbon fiber fractions. In addition, concrete production of one mb3 of concrete was reduced to a primary raw material concrete fraction. Concrete can be used as a substitute material for the gravel used in the C30/37 concrete. The use of recycled parts in concrete as a substitute for primary gravel saved 6. 9 kg CO 2 e per m3 of primary concrete, corresponding to a decrease of 21. 5 percent. The research shows that mechanical recycling of carbon fibers is overall the most effective energy input and emissions reduction route, overall. However, the recovered carbon fibers from mechanical recycling have a lower quality than pyrolysis, but not like pyrolysis. In addition, recycled aggregate concrete can save emissions by a quarter as compared to primary concrete.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10091791


Carbon Footprint of the University of Patras in Greece: Evaluating Environmental Culture and Campus’ Energy Management towards 2030

Due to the greenhouse gases produced by human activities, climate change has already had visible impacts. Hence, all countries and many multinational organisations are taking steps to minimize the Global Warming phenomenon by setting carbon dioxide reduction goals. Universities are also contributing to GHG emissions by their operations and members'u2019 activities. Energy management at the University of Patras in Greece has started since 2019 by adding energy meters ranging from manual calculations to an online platform. Using the Carbon Campus Calculator, the University of Patras' CO 2 emissions were estimated in this research. The undergraduate commuting was the primary source of GHG emissions at the University of Patras, according to the University of Patras, and the purchased electricity will follow. The University of Patras' reported results revealed that the student commuting was the main source of GHG emissions, and the student commuting was the primary source of GHG emissions; the undergraduate commuting was the leading source of GHG emissions, and the purchased electricity came next. In the future, the university's leadership team should participate actively in every change at Patras University.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/pollutants2030024


Recyclability Definition of Recycled Nanofiltration Membranes through a Life Cycle Perspective and Carbon Footprint Indicator

As a circular process, the direct end-of-life conversion of reverse osmosis membranes into recycled nanofiltration membranes has been described as a circular process. For the first time, an environmental study of the whole life cycle of r-NF membranes focused on their use. Using r-NF and commercial NF-270-400, the carbon footprint of NF water treatment processes with various pressure vessel designs and energy sources using r-NF and commercial NF-270-400 was determined. Strategy B: Due to the low cost of the r-NF upgrade, strategy A was more appropriate than B. The use of an environmental indicator CF made it possible to identify the boundaries of recyclability and applicability of r-NF membranes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes12090854


Carbon Footprint Research Based on Input–Output Model—A Global Scientometric Visualization Analysis

Reducing the impact of mankind's climate change and increasing adaptability to global warming have become important issues. In recent years, the carbon footprint, which is derived from the concept of ecological footprint, has been used to measure climate change's threat in recent years. Inputu2013output analysis has become a universally applicable CF assessment tool for tracing the carbon footprint embedded in industrial production, as a 201ctop-to-bottom approach. A large variety of CF studies from the perspective of the IOA model have been presented and have made rapid strides. The aim of this paper is to investigate the knowledge structure and frontier trends in respect of the IOA model used to CF research using scientometric visualization analysis. The study findings tend to be more microscopic, while models tend to be more complex, according to the study hotspots and trends.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811343


Reducing Carbon Footprint of Agriculture—Can Organic Farming Help to Mitigate Climate Change?

Agriculture produce has the ability to play a crucial role in combating climate change. It is also important to optimize all of the agricultural practices that produce high amounts of greenhouse gas emissions. Mineral fertilization is of utmost importance in plant production processes, as the creation of crop's carbon footprint is of the greatest importance. Fertilizer application may have several ways of lowering GHG emissions from fertilizer use. Organic farming can have the capability of lowering GHG emissions and improving organic carbon sequestration. Organic gardening could result in a higher soil organic carbon content in comparison to non-organic systems.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture12091383

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions