Advanced searches left 3/3

Carbon Footprint - Crossref

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 04 September 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Avoiding Food Wastage: The Net Impact of Maisto Bankas Activities. A Carbon Footprint Approach

Abstract The food wastage is a global phenomenon. This paper seeks to determine the net environmental benefits of the Lithuanian Food Bank's carbon footprint in terms of carbon footprint. Food banks are charities that seek to minimize the negative social consequences of food waste and food insecurity. They focus on food revival, avoiding the transformation of a food waste surplus into food waste. The present paper reviewed the positive results achieved by the Lithuanian Food Bank as the non-effect of recovered food and food non-disposal of food in landfills, as well as the non-impact of landfills.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2478/rtuect-2022-0019


Cumulative Energy Demand and Carbon Footprint of the Greenhouse Cultivation System

The paper explores the influence of horticultural production in greenhouses under Polish climate conditions on energy consumption, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. Four scenarios were tested, two of which were non-renewable fuels: coal and natural gas, while the other two were renewable energy sources: wood pellets and wood chips, identifying opportunities for lowering energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, according to the researchers. The environmental impact was determined using the carbon footprint of the major greenhouse gases emitted and using CO2 as the reference gas. Compared to the coal-burning scenario, renewable energy sources in greenhouse production can reduce total energy demand by 83. 3% and greenhouse gas emissions by 95%. Horticulture's renewable energy sources have shown a promising potential in greenhouse gas reduction, which may also be a point of inspiration to explore new options in this sector.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/app12178786


Recyclability Definition of Recycled Nanofiltration Membranes through a Life Cycle Perspective and Carbon Footprint Indicator

As a circular process, the direct end-of-life recycling of reverse osmosis membranes into recycled nanofiltration membranes has been described as a circular process. For the first time, an environmental investigation of the entire life cycle of r-NF membranes focusing on their use was conducted. The carbon footprint of NF water treatment processes with various pressure vessel designs and energy sources using r-NF and commercial NF-270-400 was determined. The utility of electricity use at the usage stage was highlighted. Strategy B: The low cost of the r-NF upgrade favoured strategy B. The r-NF replacement's low impact favoured strategy B.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes12090854


Sources of Variation in the Carbon Footprint of Hemodialysis Treatment

Background Greenhouse gas emissions from hemodialysis treatment in the United States have not been measured. Methods We estimated the size and sources of uncertainty in hemodialysis treatment's carbon footprint in 209,481 hemodialysis treatments in 2020 at 15 Ohio hemodialysis facilities belonging to the same company in order to determine the magnitude and sources of variation. The annual emissions per hemodialysis center's emissions are equivalent to emissions from 93 homes' heating use; emissions per treatment are similar to driving an average car for 238 km. Conclusions: Similar medical therapies administered in a single geographical area by facilities that are part of the same group may have minor differences in the determinants of greenhouse gas emissions. Knowing the extent and variety of greenhouse gas emissions may help identify steps to minimize the environmental impact of hemodialysis therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1681/asn.2022010086


Carbon Footprint and Energy Transformation Analysis of Steel Produced via a Direct Reduction Plant with an Integrated Electric Melting Unit

Abstract: The manufacture of flat steel products is often linked to highly integrated sites, which include hot metal production via the blast furnace, basic oxygen furnace, continuous casting, and subsequent hot-rolling. While the traditional blast furnaceu2014BOF route produces a surplus of electricity in the range of 0. 7 MJ/kg hot-rolled coil, this shortage turns into a 17 MJ/kg hot-rolled coil for a hydrogen-based direct reduction with an integrated electric melting unit. However, if the electricity input has a carbon footprint of the new German or European electricity grid mix is increasing, the specific carbon footprint of hot-rolled coil rises to 3. 0 kg CO 2 eq/kg hot-rolled coil.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40831-022-00585-x


The carbon footprint of Italian schools meals: An optimal choice of dishes in vegan, vegetarian, and omnivorous menus

This research aims to determine the carbon footprint of vegetarian, vegan, and omnivorous menus for primary school lunches in Italy's rural school lunches. Interestingly enough, the right combination of dishes and meat restriction in omnivorous menus could result in a 40% emission reduction in comparison to Rome's new school lunch menu. In addition, the menu with the lowest carbon footprint among all types of diets is provided by the correct selection of dishes in vegan menus.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2022.854049


Magnitudes of Households’ Carbon Footprint in Iskandar Malaysia: A Policy Implications for Sustainable Development

To determine a country's carbon footprint, one of the easiest ways to monitor carbon emissions from various sectors of the economy, as well as household daily activities, is to estimate a country's carbon footprint. The average showed that the primary carbon footprint, 7. 02 t-CO2 or 40. 22%, was higher than the secondary carbon footprint, which was 4. 73 t-CO2 or 40. 22%, showing substantial differences among household types. The largest carbon footprint in a medium-high cost urban area was evident at 20. 14 t-CO2, while the carbon footprint in a rural area was 9. 58 t-CO2. The primary carbon footprint of 5. 84 t-CO2 was almost doubled in the figures of 5. 84 t-CO2 in the latter than the secondary carbon footprint of 3. 73 t-CO2 in the former. The survey finds a higher carbon footprint in urban areas than in rural ones describing the effects of urbanization and urban sprawl on household life and carbon footprints.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/j5g8e


Increased carbon footprint of materials production driven by rise in investments

We know that material-related greenhouse gas emissions' dynamics is limited in order to minimize emissions reduction and the circular economy, but we do not have a deep understanding of the behavior of material-related greenhouse gas emissions in order to minimize emissions. Here, I quantify greenhouse gas emissions from material development and the carbon footprint of materials in companies that are the first users of chemicals and in final consumption, based on a multiregional input-output model of the global economy and the hypothetical extraction method. Green gas emissions from just material production increased by 12 percent from 1995 to 2015, up by 120%, with 11 billion tons CO2-equivalent emitted in 2015.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/n9ecw


Comparison of carbon footprint and water scarcity footprint of milk protein produced by cellular agriculture and the dairy industry

Purpose: Purpose This paper investigates the carbon footprint and water scarcity of a milk protein, beta-lactoglobulin, grown by cellular agriculture and compares it to extracted dairy protein from milk. The aim of the investigation is to examine the role of microbially produced milk proteins in meeting future demand for more sustainably produced protein of high nutritional quality. Methods of Purification: Methods The evaluated process determines beta-lactoglobulin production in bioreactor cultivation with filamentous fungi T. reesei and downstream processing for product purification. The carbon footprint and WSF simulations are compared to estimates and actual data on extracted dairy protein production in NZ. Results and discussion The carbon footprint of microbially produced protein varies depending on the area and source of carbon used. The lowest carbon footprint was found in NZ with sucrose-based manufacture and the highest in Australia with the glucose and chromatography steps. The avoided feed production had a greater effect on the WSF than on the carbon footprint, with a larger effect on the WSF than on the carbon footprint. The results for milk protein were of a similar magnitude, c. 10 t CO 2 e/t protein and 290:300 m 3 world eq. /t protein. Conclusions The environmental implications of microbially produced milk protein were of the same magnitude as extracted dairy protein. When renewable energy and more sustainable carbon sources are used and combined with evolving knowledge and techniques in microbial production, the carbon footprints of proteins produced by cellular agriculture have a potential for significant reduction. In the same way, the carbon footprint of milk proteins can potentially be reduced by methane reduction techniques.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11367-022-02087-0


Carbon footprint effects of Japan’s ban on new fossil fuel vehicles from 2035

Our research investigates the relationship between lifecycle CO 2 emissions and the percentage of electric vehicle sales in Japan using flexible product lifecycle models. In three scenarios, changes in sales, improvement in fuel efficiency, and changes in vehicle lifetimes are all determining the contributions of fuel efficiency and vehicle lifetime to LC-CO 2 emissions: changes in sales, increase in fuel quality, and changes in vehicle lifespan in three scenarios: changes in vehicle lifespans, as well as improvements in vehicle lifespans. Our results show that promoting electric vehicles and decarbonization of the electricity sector would reduce CO 2 emissions from the driving phase. However, even if the energy mix meets the net zero emissions target, emissions from the vehicle manufacturing phase will remain substantial, and manufacturing emissions from electric cars accounts for more than half of total emissions in 2050, even though the vehicle lifetime is extended by 5 years.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-1985572/v1

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions