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Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 02 September 2022

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Epidemiological Characteristics of Carbapenemase Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Colonization

Methods: This secondary data analysis report included 24 patients in the CP-CRE group, 113 patients in the non-CP-CRE group, and 113 in the non-CRE group, and 113 in the non-CRE group. Results: The rate of CP-CRE positivity among patients with CRE was 17. 5%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common causative agent in the CP-CRE group. There were no significant differences between patients in the CP-CRE and non-CP-CRE groups. Conclusion: Patients with multidrug-resistant organisms require medical attention that is more thorough in CRE prevention and management procedures in order to avoid CP-CRE infection.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anr.2022.05.002


Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bloodstream infections: A case-control study from a pediatric referral hospital in Argentina

Background Antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bloodstream infections remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients, despite their extensive influence on the public health care system. paraphrasedoutput:Methods is a student research that was designed to analyze demographic, epidemiological, microbiological, and outcome data as well as the use of resources between 2014 and 2019. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors for children's acquisition carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia and the use of resources. paraphrasedoutput:ResultsThe R software version 4. 1. 2 was released. The CRE-BSI and 92 controls with gram-negative non-CRE-BSI were included in a total of 46 cases. KPC in 74%, OXA in 15%, and NDM in 6. 55 percent were the most common causes of CRE bacteremia. A total of 53. 3 percent of cases vs. 32. 6 percent of controls were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, with 48 versus 21% requiring mechanical ventilation. In 56. 5 percent of cases compared to 35 percent of controls, bacteria secondary to intra-abdominal infection was found in 56. 5 percent of cases vs. 35 percent of controls. In 76% of cases vs. 8 percent of controls, prior colonization with CRE was found in 76% of cases vs. 8% of controls. In cases vs. control, the most common antimicrobial therapy was combination antimicrobial therapy. ConclusionCRE-BSI influenced hospitalized children with underlying disease, liver transplantation, and urinary catheter placement, leading to increased PICU use and mortality among younger medopenem patients, mainly after liver transplantation, and urinary catheterization.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2022.983174


Intestinal Colonization with Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Leukemia Patients: Risk Factors and Molecular Characteristics

paraphrasedoutput:Methods: The acute leukemia patients were tested for CRE by fecal/perianal swabs from January 2021 to December 2021. We aim to explore the colonization-related risk factors and molecular epidemiological characteristics of CRE in patients with acute leukemia in patients with acute leukemia. Results: We found a total of 21 colonizing strains from 320 patients. Age, cephalosporins, and tigecyclines were all independent risk factors for CRE intestinal colonization in patients with acute leukemia, according to a Logistic multivariate regression report. Early detection of CRE colonization by CRE screening is a critical step to reduce CRE transmission in CRE. Key words include carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, acute leukemia, risk factors, colonization, and colonization.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/d3492cd09e814ab6952beec7119815f0


Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among In-Patients of Tertiary Hospitals in Southwest, Nigeria

The investigation found the prevalence and risk factors associated with the outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriae among hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in Southwest, N. . . . ia, which included carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae among hospitalized patients. One or both of imipenem or meropenem was found on a total of 23 isolates, including Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis. CRE prevalence in the three countries at the time of the study was 7. 7%, according to the authors. CRE colonization was exacerbated by age and exposure to invasive devices.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15835/nsb10310300

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions