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Capuchin Monkey - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 August 2022

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Terrestriality is associated with tool use diversity in wild capuchin monkeys

Capuchin monkeys are mainly arboreal primates, but they are also the most prolific tool users among platyrrhines, routinely using stone tools on the ground due to physical limitations and material availability. Our aim was to determine the terrestriality of a group of capuchin monkeys and test the assumption that there is a connection between terrestriality and tool use variation, which may explain the differences in stone tool use between two capuchin populations that have different tool use repertoires. At Serra da Capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capuchin monkeys, Brazil, this research was focused on a group of capuchin monkeys. SCNP adult capuchins are more terrestrial than those of a population with a more limited tool use repertoire. Capuchins' stone tool use and terrestriality seem to be closely linked. Our findings support this hypothesis and reveal terrestriality measurements of the wild capuchin population, which has the most complicated stone tool kit known.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/2spnx


Vertebrate predation and tool-aided capture of preys by savannah wild capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus)

Capuchin monkeys, omnivorous neotropical primates, are omnivorous neotropical primates, and although vertebrate prey is not their primary food source, they hunt and consume them opportunistically. Bearded capuchin monkeys that live in semi-arid savannah habitats use stone tools to obtain food sources. However, only one population at Serra da Capivara National Park is known to raise predation by using stick probes. Two groups of capuchins in this population have data on vertebrate predation and consumption, which I present here here. I attended 72 instances of predation, with an overall rate of 4. 6 events/100h. Sampling and Iviva All observed vertebrate predation activities, with a total rate of 4. 6 events/100h. A good model of hominid evolution, as well as a good comparison with the Afro-Eurasian primate models, based on the predation of vertebrate prey, the use of tools to aid predation, and the high terrestriality degree in the savannah environment provide a robust capuchins a robust model of human evolution.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-1114993/v1


One Genus or Two? Evaluating Whether Gracile and Robust Capuchin Monkeys are Validly Classified as Separate Genera Based on Craniofacial Shape

For example, researchers have differing opinions about whether cebine species should be divided into one or two genera. We investigated whether craniofacial shape is a reliable taxonomic indicator among cebines and quantitatively assessed whether the amount of craniofacial variation observed among gracile and robust capuchin species is consistent with a two-genus taxonomic framework. Although statistically significant shape differences exist between gracile and robust capuchins in all four craniofacial zones investigated, the magnitude of shape differences between species groups does not support gracile and robust species being categorized into distinct genera. Our findings indicate that robust capuchin species that are often assigned to Sapajus may be more appropriately classified as Cebus under a single-genus framework for cebines based on craniofacial shape data.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10764-022-00300-3


Impact of personality traits and early life experience on timing of emigration and rise to alpha male status for wild male white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) at Lomas Barbudal Biological Reserve, Costa Rica

In 169 wild male white-faced capuchins studied at Lomas Barbudal, Costa Rica, 75 of whom immigrated and 23 of whom received alpha status, we explore how personality traits and early experiences influence the time of first ascension to alpha rank in the first ascent to alpha status.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1163/1568539x-00003418


Validating Urinary Neopterin as a Biomarker of Immune Response in Captive and Wild Capuchin Monkeys

Wild and captive primate populations are particularly helpful because it reduces the need for common invasive methods that can be ardent and potentially harmful to humans. The biomarker neopterin is an emerging tool in primatology to monitor immune activation and senescence, but most neopterin studies have concentrated on catarrhine species, with no comparative studies comparing neopterin and health in platyrrhines. To fill this void, we tested urine neopterin in two species of capuchin monkeys, a wild population of white-faced capuchins, and a socially housed captive colony of tufted capuchins. Both captive and wild primates can use neopterin to enhance knowledge of the innate immune system in platyrrhine species and we hypothese that neopterin may be useful for non-invasive health surveillance.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2022.918036


Do they know or just do it? Investigating implicit and explicit sequence learning by capuchin monkeys, human adults and children

Does other animals depend solely on implicit learning? To address this issue, we suggest that we borrow and adapt the techniques of the human implicit/explicit learning framework. We designed a completely non-verbal task in this research with the intention of investigating implicit and explicit sequence learning in human adults, children, and non-human primates. In a target tracking task on a touchscreen, participants first learned visuo-spatial sequences. They then conducted a Forced-Choice test in which they had to choose between two targets, one being the right end of the learned sequence and the other being located in an incorrect location. These results indicate that the 2-Forced-Choice test can be administered by the capuchin monkeys and that it is sensitive to both implicit and explicit knowledge. We explore how this type of study may lead to a new way of retracing the phylogeny and ontogeny of implicit and explicit learning processes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/vquz5


Social integration predicts survival in female white-faced capuchin monkeys

Abstract Throughout a variety of species of social mammals, a growing number of studies have found that individual social identity is linked to survival. We used 18 years of data from the Lomas Barbudal Monkey Project to determine social integration in 11 capuchin groups and examined whether female survivorship was associated with females'u2019 habits to engage with three specific types of partners: adult females, adult males, and adult males. Females who engaged more with other females in affiliative connections and foraged in close proximity to increase survivorship. Females may also benefit from participating in more agonistic settings with other females, according to some of the few surprising findings. Female interactions with all group members also increased survival, but the effects were still unclear. Females who did more grooming to males were more successful in adult male interactions.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arac043


Myelin characteristics of the corpus callosum in capuchin monkeys (Sapajus [Cebus] apella) across the lifespan

Abstract The corpus callosum's midsagittal region is frequently studied in relation to brain growth, connectivity, and function. Here we quantify myelin characteristics from electron microscopy to reveal more specific patterns of white matter formation within the CC. In early development, we predicted that there would be a period of rapid myelin growth within the CC. We found regional differences in myelin measurements using a locally weighted regression analysis, with posterior areas seeing more rapid increases in myelin thickness and sharper decreases in g-ratio in early development.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-12893-z


First report of Dipetalonema gracile in a captive Marcgrave’s capuchin monkey (Sapajus flavius) in northeastern Brazil: Scientific communication

Herein, we present a parasitism by Dipetalonema gracile Rudolphi, 1809, in the peritoneal cavity of a captive Marcgrave, northeastern Brazil's Cabellao, state of Paraguadba. Two filarial worms D. gracile in the abdominal cavity were discovered in the necropsy. In the spleen parenchyma, several small nodules were discovered. This is the first report on D. gracile parasitism in Marcgraveu2019s capuchin monkeys, a critically endangered species that is critically endangered.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5433/1679-0359.2022v43n2p883


Individual Variation in Response to Novel Food in Captive Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus spp.)

In this report, we examined individual differences in reaction to novel food by testing captive capuchin monkeys in unconstrained social context, in which all members of a group were able to use the testing area on a voluntary basis. We provided familiar and novel food to 23 study participants from four different social groups, differing in their previous experiences with novel food, risk tolerance, and dominance rank. Many with more exposure to novel settings would be less neophobic than those with less experience, according to We predict that those with more familiarity with novel food will be less neophobic than those with less experience. In addition, if neophobia is a manifestation of the individual's risk attitude, we expect that more risk-prone people would be less neophobic than less risk-prone ones.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2022.820323

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions