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Capuchin Monkey - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Major histocompatibility complex class II DR and DQ evolution and variation in wild capuchin monkey species (Cebinae)

In the same Human Leukocyte Antigen (Hemist Antigen), platyrrhine MHC's research has been concentrated on finding experimental models of immune system function. However, studies of standing MHC variation and evolution in wild populations are crucial to understanding its role in immunity, sociality, and ecology. For the first time in seven capuchin species, we use high-throughput sequencing to identify polymorphism in four Class II DR and DQ exons. Notably, phylogenetic findings reveal that platyrhine DQA sequences form a monophyletic group responsible for the exclusion of all Catarrhini sequences investigated. This finding contradicts the trans-species model for MHC evolution in Primates' infraorders, and provides further evidence for the independent origins of current MHC genetic diversity in Platyrrhini. Identical allele sharing across cebid species, and more rarely genera, for example, illustrates MHC gene evolution's complexity and the need for more comprehensive analyses of allelic diversity and genome structure.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0254604


What happened? Do preschool children and capuchin monkeys spontaneously use visual traces to locate a reward?

We investigated whether preschoolers and capuchin monkeys could find a reward based on physical evidence traces left after a mystery event. Monkeys with additional knowledge and expertise might be able to identify the traces to the items used in the puncturing activities in order to retrieve the reward. Capuchins did much better on the ripped foil test than they did on an arbitrary test in which the covers were not pulled off but rather replaced with a different patterned fabric.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.1101


Mutual medication in capuchin monkeys – Social anointing improves coverage of topically applied anti-parasite medicines

However, capuchin monkeys could anoint in contact with others, as well as individually. The function of social anointing has also been described as either medicinal or to increase social bonding. We tested predictions drawn from the main hypotheses about anointing and, in particular, social anointing by manipulating the abundance of an anointing resource available to two groups of tufted capuchins. Monkeys engaged in individual and social anointing in similar amounts as resources were scarce or common, and monkeys holding funds continued to join anointing groups, indicating that social anointing goes beyond simply providing access to information. The distribution of individual and social anointing steps on the monkeys' bodies supports a medical function that requires no further social bonding hypotheses. Individual anointing targets are difficult to see body parts that are impossible to handle, while social anointing targets are difficult-to-reach body organs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep15030


Wild capuchin monkeys adjust stone tools according to changing nut properties

Capuchin monkeys in the wild access a variety of nut species, including otherwise inaccessible foods, such as otherwise inaccessible species of wild bearded capuchin monkeys. The amount of caustic defensive substance in the nut mesocarp decreases during the ripening process of cashew nuts. Although fresh nuts are quicker to crack, capuchin monkeys opened them using larger stone tools, which may have helped the monkeys avoid contact with the caustic hazard present in fresh nuts.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep33089


Individualized Target Training Facilitated Transfer of Group Housed Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus apella) to Test Cubicles and Discrimination of Targets on Computer Touch Screens

In two experiments intended to promote movement from a group home enclosure to a test cubicle, we wanted to demonstrate the positive effects of u201ctarget training U201d on animal welfare. In one or two sessions, the animals learned to approach and touch their individual physical target, and were able to convert this behavior to an image of their target on a touch screen, although they made more mistakes with the touch screen. In Experiment 2, the animals were given new animalu2019 goals and novel goals. These findings show that target training will make voluntary transition from group housing to test cubicles more effective and improve future animal care and protocols.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11072070


Experimental testing of reciprocal effects of nutrition and parasitism in wild black capuchin monkeys

Abstract Nutritional stress can predispose people to disease, which in turn can have more detrimental effects on physical health, thereby increasing the possibility of reciprocal interactions between diet and parasitism. Using an experimental strategy in two groups of wild black capuchin monkeys, we investigated the reciprocal effects of nutritional status and parasitism. We found no effect of antiparasitic drugs on physical health, but parasite loads decreased in response to increased food availability. Our findings are the first experimental evidence that dietary status can influence parasite dynamics in a primate.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-12803-8


Digging up food: excavation stone tool use by wild capuchin monkeys

Abstract Capuchin monkeys at Serra da Capivara National Park primarily dig the ground for roots and fossorial arthropods, digging with their hands, but also with stone tools to loosen the soil and assist the digging process. Here we describe the stone tools used for digging by two groups of capuchins on SCNP. The most logical explanation for tool use in primates is the u201cneces hypothesisu201d, which states that the key function of tool use is to produce fallback food.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-06541-0


Capuchin and rhesus monkeys but not humans show cognitive flexibility in an optional-switch task

Abstract Learned guidelines help us solve many problems efficiently, but we do sometimes struggle to find more cost-effective alternatives by blindly following a plan. In a nonverbal computer task, humans are more vulnerable to this u201d bias than other primates. We modified the task to see if there was one hypothesis for this difference, that working memory is a factor in the benefit of taking a shortcut. In this new, simpler task than in previous work, humans used the shortcut more, but the monkeys came to using it much later than the monkeys.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-49658-0


Fruit scent and observer colour vision shape food-selection strategies in wild capuchin monkeys

While many studies have analyzed the effects of color on fruit selection, very little is known about fruit scents and how olfactory and visual data are integrated during foraging. We find that the frequency of fruit-directed olfactory behaviour is positively correlated with rises in the number of fruit odours produced during ripening. Fruits with redu2013green colour blindness sniffed fruit more often, showing that reduced capacity to detect red-u2013green colour contrast reduces.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10250-9


Capuchin and rhesus monkeys show sunk cost effects in a psychomotor task

We investigated capuchin and rhesus monkeys' u2019 susceptibility to sink costs in a psychomotor task in a psychomotor task to tease apart alternate explanations by a comparative approach. Even though the trial was incomplete, Capuchin monkeys and especially rhesus macaques persevered to completion, and were more likely to complete the trial the longer they had already tracked the target. In the absence of human-unique causes, sunk cost effects can arise, and in part, because persistent can resolve confusion.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-77301-w

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions