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Bromocriptine - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 28 July 2022

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Bromocriptine therapy: Review of mechanism of action, safety and tolerability.

Bromocriptine, a sympatholytic dopamine D2 receptor agonist with vivacious bioactivities, is a sympatholytic dopamine D2 receptor agonist with remarkable bioactivities. Bromocriptine long-term therapy has no or no adverse effects on renal, hepatic, cardiac, or hematologic functions. In a variety of dosage forms for optimal therapeutic outcomes, hyperprolactinemia-associated disorders, acromegaly, parkinsonism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other conditions, Bromocriptine is a popular alternative with high efficacy and safety profile for hyperprolactinemia-associated diseases, acromegaly, parkinsonism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other disorders. As monotherapy or in combination with other medications, it appeared to be an inexpensive and safe addition to the pharmaceutical pharmacopoeia of drugs for the treatment of a wide variety of illnesses.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35635035


Bromocriptine quick-release as adjunct therapy in youth and adults with type 1 diabetes: A randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study.

Aim: To determine the potential of glycaemic, renal, and cardiovascular benefits of bromocriptine quick release in children and adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods and methods Forty adolescents and 40 adults with type 1 diabetes aged 12 to 40 were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, random order crossover study of 4 weeks of treatment in the morning with BCQR. Both age groups, continuous glucose monitoring systems, estimated insulin sensitivity, and insulin dose did not differ with BCQR therapy. The orthostatic decrease in systolic BP, systolic BP, systemic vascular resistance, and mixed meal tolerance test glucose and glucagon-like peptide 1 areas under the curve was higher in adults, and BCQR's was higher than in BCQR. Although BCQR had no effect on glycaemia or insulin sensitivity, initial vascular and renal findings point to potential benefits of BCQR in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes who need further study.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35712800


Effects of Bromocriptine on Glucose and Insulin Dynamics in Normal and Insulin Dysregulated Horses.

Compared to non-ID horses, ID horses had elevated basal plasma concentrations of insulin and triglycerides, as well as lower adiponectin levels. ID horses had slower glucose clearance rates, which resulted in a longer time in positive phase and elevated insulin levels at 75 min compared to non-ID horses, according to the CGIT response curve. In non-ID versus ID horses, non-ID and insulin responses to the feeding challenge were lower than in ID horses. In all horses, bromocriptine therapy reduced plasma prolactin and cholesterol, as well as elevated adiponectin levels. In all horses, the postprandial glycemic and insulin response following the oats meal was lower after bromocriptine therapy. In conclusion, bromocriptine therapy improved insulin sensitivity in all horses, irrespective of their insulin status, in comparison to human and rodent studies. These findings show that EA's physiological responses in horses can be different from those in other animals relative to other species.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35711802


Comparison of bromocriptine and hydroxyethyl starch in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

Purpose The aim of this review is to determine the safety of bromocriptine in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Methods The retrospective review included women who were at risk of OHSS who were receiving gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist therapies, 52 women who were given 2. 5 mg percutaneous hydroxyethyl starch, 52 women who were receiving 500 ml intravenous hydroxyethyl starch, and 40 women who were uninhibited. Following oocyte retrieval, oocyte retrieval reveals that D-dimer levels were significantly lower in the bromocriptine and HES groups compared to the control group on Day 5 on Day 5. Conclusion Bromocriptine was not as safe as intravenous HES in patients with a high risk of OHSS as intravenous HES.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35575072

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions