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Blue Carbon - PubMed

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Last Updated: 12 April 2022

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High-Pressure Carbon Dioxide-hydrothermal Enhance Yield and Methylene Blue Adsorption Performance of Banana Pseudo-stem Activated Carbon.

The high-pressure CO2-hydrothermal treatment was designed to produce hydrochar as a precursor of activated carbon from banana pseudo-stem in order to minimize environmental risks and fungus disease dissemination of banana waste. Although the adsorption capacities of BP after high-pressure CO2-hydrothermal pretreatment are decline due to a lack of oxygen-containing functional group and a flatter spatial framework, the adsorption capacities of BPx after KOH activation are significantly higher than that of BP after direct KOH activation are higher than that of BP.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2022.127137


Heterogeneous irradiation system: enhanced degradation of methylene blue by electron beam irradiation combined with graphite carbon nitride/carbon nanodots.

The degradation of methylene blue in the present work was investigated by electron beam irradiation mixed with graphite carbon nitride/carbon nanodots. The EBI&g-C3N4/CDs approach revealed a higher removal rate of MB from aqueous solution than that of EBI alone. The synergistic effect of g-C3N4/CDs and hydrogen peroxide was shown by experiments on the existence of hydrogen peroxide. The g-C3N4/CDs sample tested in Regeneration experiments demonstrated that it has high quality and reusability, which is consistent and reusable.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-022-19934-0


High adsorption capacity of phenol and methylene blue using activated carbon derived from lignocellulosic agriculture wastes.

Clean water supplies are extremely limited around the world, and climate change is already impacting the available supplies. Consequently, developing a low-cost, highly effective, and recyclable adsorbent to improve water quality has been a significant challenge. Both physical and chemical activation techniques were tested in order to change the surface texture's properties. For the adsorption experiment, Methylene blue and phenol were used as adsorbates. With a adsorption capacity of 148. 8 mg g-1, adsorption of methylene blue dye demonstrated the ability of the water activated carbon to remove more than 95% of the dye within 5 min. 158. 9 mg g-1 was the highest adsorption capacity of phenol obtained. Although the isotherm reaction using Langmuir's model was better characterized by pseudo-second-order reaction, the kinetics of adsorption of phenol was better described by pseudo-second-order reaction, the kinetics of adsorption of phenol were more characterized by pseudo-second-order reaction. This report details a roadmap for turning lignocellulosic biomass waste into highly absorbent porous carbon adsorbents.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-09475-4


Carbon quantum dots with blue/near infrared emissions for ratiometric fluorescent lornoxicam sensing and bio-imaging.

With rambutan peel and lysine, an efficient and eco-friendly hydrothermal process for the production of nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray powder diffractometer, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, and UV spectrometry were used to describe N-CQDs' morphology, structure, and optical characteristics. The absolute fluorescence quantum yield is 1. 02%, the average particle size is 1. 63 nm, and the maximum excitation wavelength is 340 nm. The highest emission wavelengths are 430 nm and 800 nm. Using the principle of inner filter operation, lornoxicam was used to quench the fluorescence of N-CQDs as a quencher. The N-CQD's fluorescence ratio shows a good linear relationship to LNX's concentration. According to LNX's linear range and detection limit are 0. 01 to 0. 003 mol/L, respectively. LNX detection by an efficient ratiometric fluorescence probe was developed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00604-022-05262-0


Effect of K-Modified Blue Coke-Based Activated Carbon on Low Temperature Catalytic Performance of Supported Mn-Ce/Activated Carbon.

A low-temperature specific catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 was investigated in the simulated sintering flue gas, allowing us to clarify the K modified effects over activated carbon supported Mn-Ce oxide catalysts, several Mn-Ce/AC and xK-Mn-Ce/AC mixed oxide catalysts produced on AC, as shown by an impregnation method supported on AC. Mn-Ce/AC catalysts also had better resistance to SO2 and H2O than Mn-Ce/AC, which could convert 73% to 71% of NO in the presence of 5% SO2 and H2O, respectively. The relative ratios of Mn4+/Mn n+, Ce3+/Ce n+, and surface adsorbed oxygen increased after K modifications, as well as Ce3+/Ce n+ and surface adsorbed oxygen increased.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.1c07076


Prussian Blue/Carbon Nanotube Sensor Spread with Gelatin/Zein Glaze: A User-Friendly Modification for Stable Interference-Free H2O2 Amperometry.

The sandwich-type sensor was made by simple "drop and dry" steps with suspensions of the CNTs in a soluble PB solution, zein in ethanol, and gelatin in water applied sequentially to a screen-printed carbon electrode plate. Gelatin-zein-PB/CNT-SPCEs are an ideal tool for electrochemical H2O2 analyses in human body fluids, health care products, and samples from companies that use H2O2 as a bleach and germicide, and are cost-effective target assessments. Workers with little expertise in sensor manufacturing and limited funding will especially benefit from the development of the H2O2 probes, which can also be used in H2O2 testing as the transducer unit of oxidase-based biosensors with amperometric H2O2 readout.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.1c05202


Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of zeolite/activated carbon@MnO2 composite as a novel adsorbent for treatment of wastewater containing methylene blue and brilliant blue.

In this research, zeolite/activated carbon@MnO2 composite was used as a novel adsorbent to remove methylene blue and brilliant blue dyes from aqueous media. Active carbon was first manufactured by Ziziphus Spina-Christi leaves and later used to synthesize zeolite/AC@M2 composite, which was used to synthesize zeolite/AC@MnO2 composite. To this point, activated carbon was obtained by Ziziphus Spina-Christi leaves and then used to synthesize zeolite/AC@MnO2 composite. Also, the best conditions for adsorbent dye adsorption of MB and BB dyes were obtained at pH of 9 and 2 g/L, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L, initial dye concentration of 10 g/L, contact time of 40 and 60 min, respectively, according to the authors. The highest removal efficiencies of MB and BB dyes using the zeolite/AC@MnO2 composite were 98. 43% and 96. 4 percent, respectively, indicating significant adsorption efficiencies under optimal conditions. In addition, intraparticle and film diffusion techniques were highly important in the adsorption process. Generally, the aforementioned composite has a high adsorption capacity and can be a good adsorbent to remove cationic dyes from industrial effluents.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-022-09930-9


Determination of D&C Red 33 and Patent Blue V Azo dyes using an impressive electrochemical sensor based on carbon paste electrode modified with ZIF-8/g-C3N4/Co and ionic liquid in mouthwash and toothpaste as real samples.

Synthetic azo dyes are widely used in a variety of industries, but many of them pose a risk to human health, especially when consumed in large quantities. Both D&C red 33 and Patent Blue V are popular in cosmetics, especially in toothpaste and mouthwashes. As a highly reproducible electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of these common dyes, a novel carbon paste electrode coated with ZIF-8/Co nanocomposite and 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium bromide was used as a rugged carbon paste electrode. The improved sensor had a broad linear concentration range between 0. 08-10 M and 10-900 M with a low limit of detection of 0. 034 M under the optimized conditions. The value of diffusion coefficient and the electron transfer coefficient were estimated to be 310 10-5, and 0. 9 respectively. This procedure yielded a promising outcome in the real samples, with acceptable results between 96% and 97 percent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2022.112907


Efficient removal of Remazol Brilliant Blue R from water by a cellulose-based activated carbon.

Remazol Brilliant Blue R has been a lethal contaminate in aquatic environments due to its widespread use and high toxicity. Sodium-based activated carbon was synthesized at 800 °C with a NaOH-based hydrocarbon activated carbon to remove RBBR. CAC's maximum adsorption capacity on RBBR was 653. 19 mg/g, with chemical adsorption being the most common mechanism. The adsorption of RBBR by CAC by ADsorption thermodynamics was both exothermic and spontaneous, according to Adsorption thermodynamics. CAC's removal rates of RBBR by CAC in actual water bodies, including river water and artificial lake water, were above 99. 4 percent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2022.02.174


Tailoring sub-3.3 Å ultramicropores in advanced carbon molecular sieve membranes for blue hydrogen production.

Carbon molecular sieve membranes prepared by polymerization of polymers with a high number-sieving ultramicropores are suitable for high-temperature gas separations. Polymers can be first doped with thermolabile cross-linkers before low-temperature carbonization to preserve the polymer processability and obtain superior H2/CO2 separation properties. In particular, polybenzimidazole is cross-linked with pyrophosphoric acid via H bonding and proton exchange before carbonization at 600°C. This research shows that a simple and cost-effective way to tailor subnanopore size and porosity in CMS membranes with desired molecular sieving ability.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abl8160

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions