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Blue Carbon - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 12 April 2022

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Blue carbon of Mexico, carbon stocks and fluxes: a systematic review

In 2018, the approved updates to the General Law on Climate Change aligned the Mexican statute with the Paris Agreement's international goals. We evaluated Mexican blue carbon ecosystems by a systematic review of the carbon stock using the standardized method of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, as the first step in developing a mitigation and adaptation strategy against climate change in respect of conservation and restoration activities of these ecosystems. However, the average above and below ground organic carbon content from mangroves in Mexico is 113. 6 5. 5 Mg Corg ha1 and 385. 1 22, respectively. The variability in the Corg stocks for both blue carbon ecosystems in Mexico is due to changes in climate, hydrology, and geomorphology observed along the country's coasts, in addition to the number and number of plots counted with respect to the spatial coverage. We estimate a total carbon stock of 237. 7 Tg Corg from mangroves and 48. 1 Tg Corg from seagrasses in Mexico based on the official extent of mangrove and seagrass area. In the first 20 years, estimated emissions from land use change in Mexican mangroves were around 24 Tg CO2e. Therefore, the incorporation of blue carbon in the carbon market as a viable source of supplemental funding for mangrove and seagrass protection is a win-win proposition.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.8790


MAPPING OF BLUE CARBON ECOSYSTEMS: EFFECT OF PROXIMITY, ACTIVITY TYPES AND FREQUENCY OF VISITS IN THE ACCURACY OF PARTICIPATORY MAPS

In recent years, blue carbon's interest in blue carbon has drastically increased, particularly in raising the coastal resource carbon storage estimates and the design of tools for identifying and monitoring such resources. Participatory mapping methods in coastal resource mapping, participatory mapping techniques have the ability to produce a level of granularity and depth by utilizing local knowledge. We want to assess whether the accuracy of blue carbon ecosystem status obtained from participatory mapping versus the ones discriminated against from satellite photographs in this series, as well as how "relative proximity" to landmarks aids in its accuracy. It has also been found that maps created by participants who work or promote mangroves and seagrasses tend to fit better with remotely-sensed maps. Our final aim is to organize these two sources of information in a unified coastal resource map that fits perfectly.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-4-W12-83-2019


Harnessing the climate mitigation, conservation and poverty alleviation potential of seagrasses: prospects for developing blue carbon initiatives and payment for ecosystem service programmes

In this paper, we discuss the possibility of including seagrass ecosystems in climate policy frameworks, with a particular emphasis on carbon storage and sequestration, as well as the possibility of developing compensation for ecosystem service schemes that are complementary to carbon management. Despite the risks, the voluntary carbon market remains the most promising avenue for the production of carbon credits. The potentials for the introduction of seagrass Blue Carbon in regulatory compliance markets are currently limited; however, considering the risks, the voluntary carbon industry presents the most immediate avenue for the development of carbon credits. Given the diversity of ecosystem services, seagrass ecosystems provide the most cost-effective way to combat climate change, ensure seagrass conservation and improvements, as well as any carbon offsets implemented by additional ecosystem services.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2015.00032


No Detectable Broad-Scale Effect of Livestock Grazing on Soil Blue-Carbon Stock in Salt Marshes

Regardless of the tidal zone in the marsh or soil depth layer analyzed, there was no discernible correlation between grazing intensity and soil organic carbon under grazing pressure above ground vegetation composition, geometry, and biomass. According to our study, grazing impacts on carbon stocks are minimal on broader scales in comparison to the presence of environmental context. The benefits of grazing management to carbon stores are likely to be highly dependent on the situation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2019.00151


Variability of UK seagrass sediment carbon: Implications for blue carbon estimates and marine conservation management.

Seagrass study in the United Kingdom is incomplete, and there are no published studies on sediment carbon in UK seagrass meadows. Using estimates of seagrass coverage throughout the United Kingdom and recent UK C trading estimates, we estimate that the UK's seagrass standing C stock is worth between £2. 6 million and £5. 3 million. The study adds to a growing body of literature examining seagrass C storage's mechanisms. This paper, along with the fact that seagrass meadows are a critical habitat for commercially important and endangered species in the United Kingdom, as well as declining health and cover, shows the need for more effective conservation strategies for UK seagrass habitats.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0204431


Seagrass blue carbon spatial patterns at the meadow-scale.

The majority of information regarding seagrass carbon burial derives from point measurements, which are often scaled by meadow area to estimate carbon stocks; however, sediment organic carbon concentrations can vary with distance from the meadow edge, resulting in spatial shifts that influence stock estimates' accuracy. We mapped sediment Corg concentrations throughout a large restored seagrass meadow to see if Corg distribution patterns persist at different spatial scales. The meadow originated from 1-acre plots seeded between 2001 and 2004, so we expect Corg to vary spatially according to the known meadow age at sample sites and closer to the meadow edge. When estimating seagrass blue carbon stocks, managers should account for the effects of meadow construction and current velocity. Our findings show that a large, contiguous meadow will store more blue carbon than a patch of small meadow patches.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0176630


Low blue carbon storage in eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows on the Pacific Coast of Canada.

However, the paucity of geospatial and carbon storage data along the Pacific Coast of Canada, however, has hampered the inclusion of blue carbon storage data in coastal habitat planning and policy development. We analyzed the carbon storage and accumulation rates in three eelgrass meadows in southern Clayoquot Sound on British Columbia's Pacific Coast. Both aboveground biomass results for Z. marina in other regions were consistent with those for other areas, with average aboveground carbon biomass measurements of 16. 78 g C m-2 and 16. 25 g C m-2 in the intertidal and subtidal areas, respectively. Although sediment carbon stocks were generally higher in the eelgrass meadows relative to non-vegetated reference sites, carbons stocks averaged 1343 482 g Corg m-2, considerably less than global averages. These carbon measurements show that eelgrass does contribute to carbon storage in Clayoquot Sound, but at lower rates than those for more tropical seagrasses.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0198348


Barriers to incorporating ecosystem services in coastal conservation practice: the case of blue carbon

The ecosystem services framework has wielded a significant and increasing influence on environmental governance and decision making over the past decade. Despite this, the ecosystem services governance literature reveals key challenges related to scale, stakeholder identification and involvement, knowledge of ecosystem services, and dissemination of the framework. We investigate barriers to and enabling factors for the uptake of the ecosystem service model among stakeholders: local, place-based coastal conservation organizations using coastal blue carbon as a case study. We obtained data from semi-structured interviews with individuals from coastal conservation agencies in two U. S. regions that lead to a typology of five barriers to action on blue carbon. Our findings in the United States show that the concept of ecosystem services is still far from the mainstream for local, place-based coastal conservation groups.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5751/ES-12741-260440


The Game Model of Blue Carbon Collaboration along MSR—From the Regret Theory Perspective

Based on the results and analysis of the new studies on blue carbon, cooperative game, and MSR, Weber's law and regret model are introduced to create an economic model of blue carbon international cooperation, which also demonstrates the economic fidelity of blue carbon cooperation along MSR, which shows the commercial viability of blue carbon cooperation. The influence of psychological factors on the decision making of blue carbon international cooperation is also discussed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/math10061006


Living Shorelines: Coastal Resilience with a Blue Carbon Benefit.

Living shorelines are a form of estuarine shoreline erosion control that incorporates native vegetation and conserves native habitats. Shorelines are an integral component of the natural and hybrid infrastructure solution to coastal resilience because they provide the ecosystem services associated with natural coastal wetlands while also improving shoreline resilience. In the Newport River Estuary, North Carolina, we measured carbon sequestration rates in living shorelines and sandy transplanted Spartina alterniflora marshes. The pattern of lower sequestration rates in older marshes has been attributed to a relative increase in labile organic matter in younger areas, which has highlighted the importance of choosing mature marshes for determining long-term carbon sequestration potential. The results presented here are within the range of published carbon sequestration rates for S. alterniflora marshes, and they show that broad-scale use of the living shoreline method to shoreline management can result in significant carbon savings.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0142595

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions