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Blood Cancer - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 10 June 2022

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8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome

"8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome is a blood cancer that causes different types of blood cells. Based on the type of early cell from which they are descended, blood cells are divided into several groups. Individuals with 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome can experience both myeloid cell carcinoma and lymphoid cell carcinoma. Some people with 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome have lymphoma, which is a form of blood cancer that involves lymphoid cells, in addition to a myeloproliferative disorder. The cancerous lymphoid cells in lymph nodes expand and divide in lymph nodes, resulting in a tumor that enlarges the lymph nodes. T cells are found in the majority of cases of 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome, but the cancerous cells are lymphoid cells called T cells. In the majority of people with 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome, the myeloproliferative disorder progresses to acute myeloid leukemia, a rapidly growing blood cancer. Most people with 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome have signs such as exhaustion or night sweats.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/8p11-myeloproliferative-syndrome


Sézary syndrome

"Su00e9zary syndrome is a sporadic form of blood cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma," the author says. When certain white blood cells, called T cells, become cancerous, cause various types of skin lesions, Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas occur; these tumors can cause a variety of skin lesions. People with S1zary syndrome have a red, itchy rash that covers large portions of their body. However, the skin cells themselves are not cancerous; however, when Su00e9zary cells migrate from the blood to the skin, skin irritations are created; however, the skin cells are not cancerous; however, the skin cells are not cancerous; skin irritations result when Su00e9zary cells migrate from the blood into the skin. People with Su00e9zary syndrome also have large lymph nodes. People with Suci0e9zary syndrome are less likely to regulate their body temperature than those without the condition. Although Su00e9zary syndrome is often referred to as a clone T-cell lymphoma called mycosis fungoides, these two tumors are generally considered separate disorders.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/sezary-syndrome


Mycosis fungoides

"Mycosis fungoides is the most common form of a form of blood cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. " Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas occur when certain white blood cells, called T cells, become cancerous; these cancers also affect the skin, resulting in different forms of skin lesions. Although the skin is involved, the skin's skin is not cancerous, the skin's cells themselves are not cancerous. Mycosis fungoides is most common in adults over the age of 50, although some children have been identified. Mycosis fungoides can progress slowly through several stages, although not all people with the condition progress through all stages. Patches, which are flat, scaly, pink or red patches on the skin that can be itchy, are the first symptoms that are most affected individuals. The skin cells themselves are not cancerous, but skin irritations result as cancerous T cells migrate from the blood to the skin, causing skin irritations. The new stage of mycosis fungoides is in some affected people, from patches to plaques. While some plaques appear from patches, some appear on their own, and an affected individual can have both patches and plaques at once. In plaques, cancerous T cells are identified as with patches as with patches. The tumors in mycosis fungoides, which are made up of cancerous T cells, are raised nodules that are thicker and deeper than plaques, and are thicker and deeper than plaques. Any stage of mycosis fungoides can cause spread to other organs, but it is most common in the tumor stage. In addition, affected people are at a higher risk of experiencing another lymphoma or some other form of cancer.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mycosis-fungoides


Erdheim-Chester disease

"Erdheim-Chester disease, a rare form of slow-growing blood cancer, leads to overproduction of cells called histiocytes. " In Erdheim-Chester disease, increased production of histiocytes results in inflammation that can harm organs and tissues throughout the body, causing them to become thickened, dense, and scarred; organ damage can result in organ failure. Due to an abnormal rise in bone density, people with Erdheim-Chester disease commonly suffer bone pain, particularly in the lower legs and upper arms. Abnormally high pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid within the skull caused by accumulation of histiocytes in the brain may result in headaches, seizures, cognitive impairment, or difficulty with mobility or sensation. Erdheim-Chester disease is most prevalent between the ages of 40 to 60, but the condition can occur at any age. ".

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/erdheim-chester-disease


Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome

"A prominent risk of developing tumor-like tumors called rhabdoid tumors is found in rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome. " The rhabdoid tumors that occur in RTPS usually grow and spread quicker than those in children without this predisposition, and most of the affected individuals do not live past childhood. In the cerebellum, the brain region that coordinates movement, more than half of all malignant rhabdoid tumors develop. Rhabdoid tumors in the brain and spinal cord have been described as atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors. Rhabdoid tumors also occur outside of the central nervous system. People with RTPS can have a variety of rhabdoid tumors, even within the same family. Other than rhabdoid tumors can also occur in people with RTPS. Women with RTPS are at an elevated risk of experiencing a rare form of ovarian cancer called small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type. '.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/rhabdoid-tumor-predisposition-syndrome


5q minus syndrome

Myelodysplastic syndrome, or 5q minus syndrome, is a form of bone marrow disorder. MDS refers to a group of conditions in which immature blood cells refuse to develop normally, resulting in a proliferation of immature cells and a lack of mature blood cells. Although most people with 5q- syndrome have no signs relating to anemia, especially in the early stages of the disease, some affected individuals have extreme exhaustion, anxiety, and an abnormally pale appearance as the illness progresses. Individuals with 5q- syndrome also have abnormal growth of bone marrow cells that produce platelets, which are essential to blood clotting. Hypolobated megakaryocytes are a common finding in people with 5q- syndrome. AML is less common in people with 5q- syndrome than in those with other MDS forms.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/5q-minus-syndrome


Dyskeratosis congenita

"People with dyskeratosis congenita are at a greater risk of experiencing several life-threatening disorders. " Aplastic anemia, also known as bone marrow failure, can occur in individuals affected by bone marrow failure, which occurs when the bone marrow does not have sufficient new blood cells to support. Even if they never experience myelodysplastic syndrome, people with dyskeratosis congenita are still at an elevated risk of leukemia. People with dyskeratosis congenita may also have pulmonary fibrosis, a condition that causes scar tissue to build up in the lungs, that can reduce the flow of oxygen into the bloodstream. Some affected males may have narrowing of the urethra, or the tube that removes urine from the bladder. Uterosis can result in difficult or painful urination and urinary tract infections. The least severely affected people have only a few brief physical signs of the condition and normal bone marrow functions. Although most people with dyskeratosis congenita have normal intelligence and motor skills such as standing and walking, developmental delay can occur in some severely affected individuals. Individuals with Hoyeraal Hreidaarsson syndrome, uncommonly small and underdeveloped cerebellum, the part of the brain that coordinates movement. In addition to the other signs of dyskeratosis congenita, there is another common variation, Revesz syndrome, which causes abnormalities in the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/dyskeratosis-congenita

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions