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Arthritis - MedlinePlus Genetics

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 10 June 2022

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Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

"Juvenile idiopathic arthritis" refers to a group of illnesses affecting joint inflammation that first appear before the age of 16. In one or two joints, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis causes inflammation. Individuals with systemic arthritis may have a skin rash or enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, or spleen. The occurrence of arthritis in four or fewer joints in the first 6 months of the disease is characterized by Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Individuals with oligoarthritis are at an elevated risk of experiencing eye inflammation. In five or more joints within the first six months of the disease, Rheumatoid factor positive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis causes inflammation in five or more joints. Individuals with this disease also have a positive blood test for proteins named rheumatoid factors. This type of arthritis closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis as seen in adults. Arthritis in five or more joints within the first six months of the disease is also characterized by a Rheumatoid factor negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Psoriatic juvenile idiopathic arthritis of arthritis is common in conjunction with arthritis that occurs in combination with a skin disorder called psoriasis. Some affected individuals experience psoriasis prior to arthritis, while others experience arthritis first. The bone tenderness where the bone meets a tendon, ligament, or other connective tissue is characteristic of Enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Enthesitis-related arthritis may also cause inflammation in areas of the body other than the joints. Undifferentiated arthritis is the most common manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/juvenile-idiopathic-arthritis


Psoriatic arthritis

"Psoriatic arthritis is a condition that causes joint pain that often occurs in conjunction with a skin disorder called psoriasis. " People with psoriasis may also have changes in their fingernails and toenails, such as nail pitting, crumbling, or separate from the nail beds. Signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis include stiff, painful joints, redness, heat, and swelling in the surrounding tissues. Psoriatic arthritis sufferers in the majority of people with psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis appears before joint pains develop. Psoriatic arthritis develops in a small number of cases in the absence of apparent skin changes. Psoriatic arthritis may be difficult to distinguish from other types of arthritis, particularly if skin changes are minimal or absent. Two features that are characteristic of psoriatic arthritis are Nail changes and dactylitis, but they do not appear in any cases. The asymmetric oligoarticular type of psoriatic arthritis suffers different joints on each side of the body, while the symmetric polyarthritis model affects the same joints on both directions. Some people with psoriatic arthritis have joint involvement that mainly involves spondylitis, or inflammation of the vertebrae of the spine's joints. arthritis mutilans is the most severe and least common form of psoriatic arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis sufferers account for less than half of those with psoriatic arthritis have this disorder. Bone loss at the joints may lead to finger and toe shortening. Neck and back pain can also occur. ".

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/psoriatic-arthritis


Rheumatoid arthritis

"Rheumatoid arthritis is a disorder that causes chronic inflammation, mainly impacting the joints. " People with rheumatoid arthritis often complain that getting out of bed in the morning or after a long rest is the most painful. Rheumatoid arthritis can also cause inflammation of other organs and organs, including the eyes, lungs, and blood vessels. Almost all affected individuals experience rheumatoid nodules, which are hard lumps of noncancerous tissue that can grow under the skin and elsewhere in the body. Rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms usually appear in mid- to late adulthood. Many people with health problems have symptoms followed by periods with no signs for the rest of their lives. In severe cases, affected individuals have persistent health issues related to the disease for many years. ".

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/rheumatoid-arthritis


Gout

"Gout is a form of arthritis, which is a group of related disorders exacerbated by chronic inflammation in the joints. " People with gout have elevated uriate levels in the blood. When hyperuricemia leads to the formation of urate crystals in joints, the immune system responds aninflammatory response. The first episode of inflammation usually affects the big toe or other joints in the foot or ankle, particularly in people with gout. The time between flares varies among impacted individuals; however, the majority of people who experience multiple flares have their second one within a year of their first. Fevers may occur, but the skin over the affected joint can begin to peel, and it can be painful. People with gout can have frequent flares and joint pain, diminishing mobility, and quality of life, limiting mobility and reducing quality of life can be limited by inadequate care. Urate deposits in the kidneys and kidney stones are present in about 15% of people with gout. Urate crystals can also be deposit under the skin or in other soft tissue, resulting in a nodule called a tophus as the disease progresses. In addition, many people with gout have other health problems. It's unclear whether gout is the cause of a person's elevated risk of these diseases, or whether the conditions contribute to the formation of gout, or if both of these conditions contribute to disease. ".

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/gout


Blau syndrome

"Blau syndrome is a inflammatory disorder that predominantly affects the skin, joints, and eyes. Granulomatous dermatitis, a common cause of Blau syndrome, is a common sign of Blau syndrome. This skin condition can cause persistent rash that can be scaly or have hard lumps that can be felt under the skin. Arthritis is another common feature of Blau syndrome. The tendons and joints can be inflamed as well as the joints can be irritated, causing tenosynovitis in people with Blau syndrome. Uveitis, which is swelling and inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, is common among Blau syndrome patients. The uvea is the colored portion of the eye and nearby tissues that support the white portion of the eye. The eye's outermost protective layer of the eye, the tear glands, the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye, and the nerve that links information from the eye to the brain can all become inflamed. Although individuals with Blau syndrome may have normal vision, inflammation of any of these organs may cause extreme vision loss or blindness. Blau syndrome sufferers have kidney disease as a result of inflammation. Inflammation of blood vessels can cause scarring and tissue death in the vessels, as well as a blockage of blood flow to tissues and organs. People affected by nerve injury, episodes of fever, or elevated blood pressure in the blood vessels that carry blood from the heart to the lungs are extremely rare.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/blau-syndrome


Osteoarthritis

"Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease that most commonly occurs in older adults. " Bone fractured bone areas that are no longer covered by cartilage rub against each other and begin to crumble. Abnormal bone and other tissue growths can also occur, and it may be apparent as enlarged joints. People with osteoarthritis typically experience pain after periods of inactivity, such as on awakening or standing from a chair; the stiffness usually increases as they move about. Osteoarthritis is most common in middle age or late adulthood, because the joint cartilage begins to thin as we age. However, it can happen earlier in life, particularly after ankle ligament damage caused by knee pains, particularly an anterior cruciate ligament tear. People who are overweight or whose hobbies are particularly demanding to the joints are also at a higher risk of osteoarthritis.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/osteoarthritis


Ankylosing spondylitis

"Ankylosing spondylitis is a painful, chronic joint inflammation that predominantly affects the spine. Early signs of ankylosing spondylitis typically begin between the ages of 15 to 30. Most commonly, affected individuals first experience persistent back pain and stiffness. Pain in ankylosing spondylitis results from joint inflammation between the pelvic bones and the spine's base. In more than half of cases, ankylosing spondylitis affects the eyes, resulting in episodes of eye inflammation called acute iritis. Acute iritis usually affects one eye at time, causing eye pain and increased sensitivity to light, which can be difficult to detect. Ankylosing spondylitis can cause serious problems involving the heart, lungs, and nervous system. People with ankylosing spondylitis have additional inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, which affects the skin, or uclerative colitis or Crohn disease, which can both impact the digestive tract.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/ankylosing-spondylitis

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions