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Aquatic Invertebrates - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 25 May 2022

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Evaluating Methods of Preserving Aquatic Invertebrates for Microbiome Analysis

The effect of common storage methods on the organism's microbial composition is uncertain, and the storage method used to collect aquatic invertebrates has not been standardized across the scientific community. The bacterial community was preserved for two species of field-collected crayfish stored either in ethanol or frozen, as well as the aquarium crayfish's gut microbiome. However, there were significant differences between the bacterial cultures identified on the exoskeleton of aquarium crayfish stored in ethanol compared to those that were frozen. Despite significant differences in gut microbial composition between species, the microbiome was conserved between storage techniques, but storage methods preserved the microbiome. These results show that preserving aquatic invertebrates cultured in 95% ethanol is likely to be a fast and cost-effective sample preservation strategy for subsequent gut microbiome analysis, but is less reliable for external microbiome.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10040811


DNA-based identification of aquatic invertebrates useful in the South African context?

For South African biologists, the idea of using specific regions of DNA to identify organisms is not new to them. By July 2013, 12 548 plant species and 1493 animal species had been banned in South Africa, according to the African Centre for DNA Barcoding, although the Barcode of Life Database holds 62 926 records for South Africa, 11 392 of which had species names. In light of all of this, it is surprising that aquatic macroinvertebrates of South Africa have not received much attention as potential barcoding projects have remained largely ignored – barcoding aquatic species and fishes has tended to be focusing on invasive species and fishes. Aquatic ecosystems are highly suited to these methods, so could they be useful in a South African context?

Source link: https://doi.org/10.17159/sajs.2016/20150444


Experimental manipulation of leaf litter colonization by aquatic invertebrates in a third order tropical stream

In two sections of a tropical stream that varied in function of the canopy cover, one with the presence of leaf litter and another without riparian vegetation, during one month of the dry and one of the wet season. The evaluation of the remaining litter dry mass per leaf bag reveals differences that are mainly due to seasonality, canopy cover, and leaf type, although leaf condition was also important when combining those three factors. Even though canopy cover alone was not a significant source of variation in the abundance of invertebrates, the results revealed a connection of a canopy cover with seasonality and leaf condition.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1590/1519-6984.15013


Effects of pharmaceuticals on immune parameters of aquatic invertebrates

Pharmaceuticals are a large group of chemicals used by humans for personal health or by agribusiness to improve livestock's growth and health. Both pharmaceutical intake and error free disposal of unused or expired medications have made significant contributions to the introduction of pharmaceuticals into the environment. This paper seeks to summarise the most recent findings on the effects of certain classes of pharmaceuticals on aquatic invertebrates' immune response parameters.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/30774b52a33040d58178df3fc7d325f1


Role of diapause in dispersal and invasion success by aquatic invertebrates

In comparison to natural vectors, the increasing presence of human-mediated vectors of species dispersal during the last century highlighted the increasing role of human-mediated vectors of species dispersal during the last century. In comparison to traditional nature-driven species dispersal rates, new aquatic species introductions in several orders of magnitude. Some invasive species of Cladocera can live cycles, transitioning to the early prolonged gamogenetic reproduction, which supports their invasion success into new ecosystems and further dispersal by both natural and human-mediated vectors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4081/jlimnol.2004.s1.56


Relationships between aquatic invertebrates, water quality and vegetation in an Andean peatland system

Peatlands provide vital socioeconomic and environmental services in the Peruvian Puna ecoregion, particularly as a source of water and forage for domestic cattle. The results reveal that the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage is a good indicator of the trophic status of the small pools that are typical in bofedales.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/0392eeeaa7e7410b85abd281e1e2ffd4


The role of histones in the immune responses of aquatic invertebrates

Several techniques for regulating and facilitating histones' antimicrobial action against pathogens have been described in vertebrate and some invertebrate species, including the manufacture of Extracellular Traps and histone accumulation in lipid droplets that can be selectively released in response to immune stimuli. Further studies are required to determine the mechanisms of action of histones in immune responses in aquatic invertebrates and investigate the potential use of histones in the treatment of infectious diseases in aquaculture.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/cc6c6a80d4cd43f4a54722b2f13d7382


Assessing the role of canopy cover on the colonization of phytotelmata by aquatic invertebrates: an experiment with the tank-bromeliad Aechmea lingulata

The presence of canopy cover in bromeliad tanks may influence the amount of organic detritus and stored water in bromeliad tanks and, therefore, the colonization of these ecosystems by aquatic invertebrates. In Brazil's sandy coastal plains, a variety of plant species made this study possible. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of canopy cover on the colonization of the tank-bromeliad Aechmea lingulata in the restinga, an ecosystem made up of a variety of plant species. Average daily values of water temperature and light intensity in unshaded were higher than in shaded bromeliads. The amount of fine particulate organic matter and stored water varied between treatments, but in shaded bromeliads, the amount of coarse particulate organic matter was higher. Our results showed that canopy covers had only a small effect on the colonization of tanks of A. lingulata in restinga, not corroborating the hypothesis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4081/jlimnol.2016.1526


Mycobacteriosis in Aquatic Invertebrates: A Review of Its Emergence

Mycobacteriosis is a common bacterial disease found in aquatic and terrestrial animals, including humans. Mycobacteriosis is a common species of aquatic vertebrates, but in the last few years, reports of its presence in aquatic invertebrates have increased for both freshwater and marine species. The number of reported cases is also on the rise in the number of reported cases due to wild aquatic species domestication and modern aquaculture intensification. Mycobacterium in aquatic invertebrates may also be affected by global climate change, which may also influence microbes' growth and survival rates, pathogen transmission, and host susceptibility. Many species of Mycobacterium have been described in aquatic invertebrates, with some of them being significant due to their broad host range, economic impact in aquaculture, and zoonotic potential.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081249

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions