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Aquatic Invertebrates - Crossref

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Last Updated: 25 May 2022

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Experimental manipulation of leaf litter colonization by aquatic invertebrates in a third order tropical stream

The colonization of leaf litter by invertebrates was investigated in two sections of a tropical stream with the presence of the canopy cover, one with the presence of the presence and another without riparian vegetation during one month of the dry and one of the wet season. When combining those three factors, leaf type, season, canopy cover, and leaf type were all significant, but leaf condition was also important. And though canopy cover was not a significant factor of variation in the abundance of invertebrates, the results showed a correlation of a combined effect of canopy protection with seasonality and leaf condition, suggesting a correlation between canopy cover and leaf condition.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1590/1519-6984.15013


Research priorities for sound and vibration effects on fishes and aquatic invertebrates from offshore wind energy development

There are significant knowledge gaps regarding animal responses and the responses of animals to sounds associated with pre-construction, design, and offshore wind energy development. As the OSW industry expands, a task group of the 2020 State of the Science Workshop on Wildlife and Offshore Wind Energy suggested priority studies for the next five years to help stakeholders fully comprehend potential cumulative biological impacts of sound and vibration to fishes and aquatic invertebrates.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0011189


Evaluating Methods of Preserving Aquatic Invertebrates for Microbiome Analysis

The results of two common storage techniques, preserving in 95% ethanol and freezing at 20 °C, were determined using crayfish and dragonfly nymphs collected from a natural pond and crayfish maintained in an aquarium. The bacterial community was preserved for two sample species of field-collected crayfish stored either in ethanol or frozen, as well as the gut microbiome of aquarium crayfish, according to the researchers. Nevertheless, there were significant differences between the bacterial cultures found on the exoskeleton of aquarium crayfish stored in ethanol compared to those that were frozen. Both species of gut microbial composition, with different species of dragonfly nymphs, were found in difference in gut microbial composition, but storage methods kept the microbiome intact, although storage methods kept the microbiome constant. These findings show that preserving field-collected specimens of aquatic invertebrates in 95% ethanol is likely to be a simple and cost-effective sample preservation technique for subsequent gut microbiome analysis, but not so effective for external microbiome analysis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10040811

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions