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Angina - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 10 September 2022

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Unstable Angina /Non ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Frequency of Conventional Risk Factors; TIMI Risk Score, and Their Impact On Angiographic Data

Background: Appreciation of the vital role of risk factors in coronary artery disease formation is one of the most important findings in the study of this common disease. In LMS, 82% of patients with a TIMI score > 4 % had one or two risk factors, with 80% reporting stenosis in any one of the three major epicardial vessels and u2265 percent lacking none of the four common risk factors, while male patients with TIMI score > 4 % being rated as a result of a significant risk factor, and only 18% of patients had one or more risk factors, and only 18% of patients had one of filtration Patients with a TIMI risk factor exposure 4 were more likely to have significant three vessel CAD and LMS than those with a TIMI risk score 4 who have less severe disease compared to those with a TIMI risk factor 4 who have less severe disease compared to those with a TIMI risk score > 4 were more likely to have significant three vessel CAD and LMS than those with a low risk factor determining CAD risk factor exposures Patients with a high TIMI risk score were more likely to have severe multivessel CAD than those with lower or intermediate TIMI risk scores. Patients with a TIMI score > 4 should therefore be referred to early invasive coronary screening to derive clinical benefit.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/e9ad87a898514f5d90fb783fd95d7988


Alprostadil vs. isosorbide dinitrate in ameliorating angina episodes in patients with coronary slow flow phenomenon: A randomized controlled trial

paraphrasedoutput:Methods explains how alprostadil and isosorbide dinitrate reduced angina episodes in CSFP patients with stable angina in this prospective, randomized controlled trial. This report compared the alprostadil group to either the alprostadil group or the isosorbide dinitrate group in a ratio of 1:1 to either the alprostadil group or the isosorbide dinitrate group in this prospective, randomized controlled study. At baseline and one month later, the frequency of angina events, the acucity of pain, and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society's grading of angina pectoris were assessed. Patients treated with alprostadil had fewer angina episodes [episodes per week, 1 vs. 2 0. 001] and less pain intensity [self-evaluated pain score, 2 vs. 3; P 0. 001] and less pain intensity [episodes per week, P 0. 001] than those with isosorbide dinitrate, with less pain severity] than those with isosorbide dinitrate Patients in the alprostadil group were classified as CCS class I, significantly higher than the 47. 1% observed in the isosorbide dinitrate group.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2022.965364


Variant Angina is Associated with Myocarditis

Patients with variant angina have poor clinical outcomes, but nitrates and calcium blockers can help patients get better patient conditions because there is no information or causal treatment of the disease and causal treatment. Patients with VSA were recruited as controls by acute myocardial infarction, standard electrocardiography, and coronary angiography, among other conditions. Results: Interleukin -12p70, IL-13, PDL-1, IL-10, IL-15, MIP-1, IL-10, IL-16, IL-10, IL-15, MIP-1, IL-36, MIP-1, u03b1-u03b1, IL-17, PDL-1, PIL-13, MIP-1, IL-15, TIG-11, IL-15, VSA-03b1, MIP-1u03b1u03b1u03b1u03b1a, PDL-1, IL-13, PDP-1, u03b1u03b1, IL-16, IL-17, u03b1 IL-15, IL-16, u03b1a IL-17, IL-10, u03b1-36, IL-17, IL-10, IL-15, MIP-1u03b1-u03b1u03b1u03b1, IL-b1 b1 Conclusion: The left ventricle, coronary perivascular tissue volume, and coronary perivascular FDG uptake in all four patients was significantly elevated, suggesting that VSA patients have elevated plasma cytokine levels and myocardial and pericoronary inflammation, which can be attributed to myocarditis.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/5120316db26f4b71a61e1b204224e3e5


Ethnic and Regional Differences in the Management of Angina: The Way Forward

For decades, there has been a lot of interest in ethnic variations in the treatment of angina and stable cardiovascular disease. While there is no doubt that individualised therapies will progress rapidly over the coming years and decades, clinicians can take the most immediate action to eliminate disparities in both the evidence base and care delivery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/ecr.2021.60


Microvascular Angina: Diagnosis and Management

Patients with microvascular angina are at risk of major adverse cardiac events such as MI, stroke, heart failure, and death with preserved ejection fraction and death, but no evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and therapy have been released yet to date. The Coronary Vasomotion Disorders International Study Group updated and revised diagnostic criteria for microvascular angina diagnosis using both surgical and non-invasive techniques.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/ecr.2021.15


Invasive Diagnosis of Coronary Functional Disorders Causing Angina Pectoris

Coronary vaping disorders are a common cause of angina and/or dyspnoea in patients with nonobstructed coronary arteries. At rest, coronary blood flow at rest, and microvascular resistance, are all important vasodilatation established parameters that are consistent with safe vaping. Ischaemia associated with microvascular spasm can be established by ischaemic ECG changes and the measurement of lactate concentrations in the coronary sinus. This paper reviews newly available invasive techniques for the diagnosis of coronary vascular disorders causing angina pectoris.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/ecr.2021.06


Bridging the Gap in a Rare Cause of Angina

When coronary arteries run intramurally, the myocardial bridging takes place. Due to low shear tension and high oscillatory wall-flow, proximally in the bridge plaques develop proximally in the bridge. Endothelial health is dependent on arterial flow rates, considering that the vessel responds differently to various flow rates as demonstrated in 3D simulations. Distinguishing physiological arterial compression from pathological stenosis is critical. If you're looking for a unique angina with an instantaneous wave-free rate of u22640. 89 or fractional flow reserve u22640. 80 are treated.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/ecr.2020.33


Diagnostic Approach to Patients with Stable Angina and No Obstructive Coronary Arteries

On non-invasive stress tests, however normal coronary arteries at angiography, the diagnosis of microvascular angina is most common in patients with angina symptoms and signs of MI. The key issues in the investigation of clinical and diagnostic findings in patients with suspected MVA are addressed, as well as a diagnostic approach.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/ecr.2019.22.2


How to Diagnose and Manage Angina Without Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease: Lessons from the British Heart Foundation CorMicA Trial

Patients with symptoms and/or signs of ischaemia, but no obstructive coronary artery disease present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The two most common causes of INOCA are microvascular and/or vaping angina; however, invasive coronary angiography lacks the ability to diagnose these functional coronary disorders. In this article, the authors recapite the justification for invasive testing in the absence of obstructive coronary disease, namely that appropriate care for angina patients begins with the right diagnosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/icr.2019.04.R1


Stable Angina Medical Therapy Management Guidelines: A Critical Review of Guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

Patients with chronic angina can be managed with lifestyle changes, especially smoking cessation and regular exercise, as well as taking antianginal medications. Antianginal drugs are equally safe and none of them reduced mortality or the risk of MI, according to the study, yet guidelines recommend the use of beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers as a first-line therapy. Guidelines for the treatment of stable coronary artery disease in the European Society of Cardiology guidelines include classes of recommendation with evidence that are well defined.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.15420/ecr.2018.26.1

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions