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Angina - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 August 2022

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Spinal pathologies and management strategies associated with cervical angina (pseudoangina): a systematic review

OBJECTIVE Cervical angina pectoris, also known as angina pectoris, is a noncardiac disease of chest pain that often mimics angina pectoris, but it is not a spine disease. Ultimately, cervical angina is a significant component of the list of differential diagnoses in noncardiac chest pains. The authors' paper, "the first comprehensive systematic review of cervical and thoracic pathologies associated with cervical angina, as well as the various treatment techniques used to treat this disease was published in the present study. The majority of cervical angina cases were caused by cervical angina cases, and surgical interventions predominated over physical therapy and medical management approaches. Every patient who was evaluated at a follow-up reported relief from symptoms related to cervical angina. CONCLUSIONS Cervical angina is a noncardiac syndrome of chest pain attributed to a variety of cervical and thoracic spinal pathologies, the most common of which is cervical disc herniation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.7.spine20866


Ludwig’s angina: diagnosis and treatment

Ludwig's angina is often an angina of odontogenic origin, affecting the soft tissues of the submandibular, sublingual, and submental region. This paper aimed to analyze the existing literature on Ludwigu2019s angina's clinical characteristics, applications for diagnosis, and treatment modalities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21726/rsbo.v10i2.916


Diagnostic and Management Strategies in Patients with Late Recurrent Angina after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Purpose of Study This paper will detail the latest findings on the anatomical, functional, and physiological techniques that may be used in the assessment of patients with late recurrent angina following coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients with prior CABG may have late recurrent angina as a result of bypass graft failure and the onset of native coronary artery disease. Patients with late recurrent angina following CABG, especially the new generation coronary computed tomography angiography, are among a complex diagnostic effort to determine the correct repeat revascularization strategy in patients with late recurrent angina after CABG.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11886-022-01746-w


Prognostic Impact of Chronic Vasodilator Therapy in Patients With Vasospastic Angina

Background In order to treat vaping angina, chronic vaping therapy using long-acting nitrate is often used. We investigated the prognostic effects of vasodilator therapy in patients with vainospastic angina from the multicenter, prospective VACORE registry. Methods and Results We analyzed results from 1895 patients with positive intracoronary ergonovine provocation test findings, and we examined results. However, the acute coronary syndrome risk in the conventional nitrate and mixed groups was significantly higher than in the no-u2010vasodilator group, although the inverse probability of treatment weights was determined. With an intermediate positive ergonovine provocation test result and in patients with low Japanese Coronary Spasm Association scores, prominent adverse effects of nitrate were found in patients with a poor Japanese Coronary Spasm Association score. Conclusions Longer-Acting nitrate-u2010 daily vaping therapy was associated with an elevated risk of acute coronary syndrome in patients with vaping angina, especially in low-risk patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1161/jaha.121.023776


Predicting Residual Angina After Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Insights from the OPEN‐CTO Registry

Consequently, we identified risk factors related with residual angina prevalence after CTO PCI and created a model to forecast postprocedure anginal burden. Methods and Results Among patients in the OPEN-u2010CTO registry, we investigated the relationship between patient characteristics and residual angina frequency at 6 months, using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire Angina Frequency Scale, which was determined by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire Angina Frequency Scale. The Seattle Angina Questionnaire Angina Frequency Scale's score increased by 53% in six months, and that same result was up by 53%. The final model to predict residual angina after CTO PCI included baseline angina frequency, baseline nitroglycerin use frequency, dyspnea signs, depressive signs, a number of antianginal drugs, PCI detection, and the presence of multiple CTO lesions, as well as the presence of multiple CTO lesions and a C index of 0. 78. Baseline angina frequency and nitroglycerin use frequency revealed 71% of the model's predictive power, and the relationship between model elements and angina rise at 6 months differed by baseline angina status.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1161/jaha.121.024056


Management of stable angina

Myocardial ischaemiau2014, Angina (u2014) is the pain caused by myocardial ischaemiau2014 is usually caused by obstructive coronary artery disease that is sufficiently severe to limit oxygen delivery to the cardiac myocytes. In patients with non-anginal chest pain, an artery examination is usually unnecessary, but persistent medical anomaly can be resolved in those with atypical or classic angina by CT coronary angiography, the noninvasive test of choice.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198746690.003.0366


Chronic stable angina

The treatment of patients with chronic angina has two main goals: to enhance clinical outcome and reduce angina symptoms.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198759935.003.0006_update_002


Coronary artery spasm and microvascular angina

A variety of coronary abnormalities, ranging from acute coronary atherosclerotic stenoses to functional coronary vasomotor disorders, are present in Ischaemic heart disease. Diagnostic algorithms should not only focus on the diagnosis of atherosclerotic epicardial disease, but also look for the presence of functional coronary disorders. Patients with obstructive coronary disease have been barred, particularly patients in whom obstructive coronary disease has been identified as having u2018non-cardiac chest pains are present. u2019 This chapter gives an overview of the latest pharmacological care of patients with coronary artery spasm and those suffering from microvascular angina.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198759935.003.0007_update_001


Chronic stable angina

Patients with chronic stable angina are prone to chest pains of a particular kind limited to effort alone, owing to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. First, there must be stable atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, which has resulted in luminal narrowing in one or two of the major epicardial coronary arteries. This time limit is crucial because it allows the identification of signs ranging from coronary blockage due to atheroma, atheroma with superadded thrombus, which can be very unstable and lead to complete coronary blockage with all its attendant risks. The degree of coronary blockage in acute coronary syndromes is stable, as opposed to that of rapidly expanding coronary blockage seen in acute coronary syndromes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199568741.003.0089


Vasospastic angina

Angina at rest that responds immediately to short-acting nitrates is the hallmark of vainospastic angina. However, exercise-related disorders may also be present in epidermal spasm's clinical presentation. Coronary spasm can be present in patients with normal or unobstructed coronary arteries, but also in patients with epicardial stenoses and those with recent coronary revascularization. Diffuse spasm of the distal left anterior descending coronary artery is a common finding in European patients. Coronary spasms can also exist at the level of coronary microcirculation, which is a sign of coronary microvascular dysfunction.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780198784906.003.0346

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions