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Amphibians - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 06 August 2022

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The Cryo-EM structures of two amphibian antimicrobial cross-β amyloid fibrils

The amyloid-antimicrobial association hypothesis is based on antimicrobial activity in human amyloids involved in neurodegenerative and systemic diseases, as well as amyloidal structural characteristics present in antimicrobial peptides. We present amyloid cross-u03b2 fibrils of mated u03b2 sheets at atomic resolution in two AMPs from amphibians, uperin 3. 5 and auger 3. 3, in support of this hypothesis. This cross-u03b2 cryo-EM structure complements the cross-u03b1 fibril conformation that was previously determined by crystallography, proving a secondary structure change mechanism for uperin 3. 5.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-32039-z


Amphibian phylogenetic diversity in the face of future climate change: not so good news for the chilean biodiversity hotspot

Climate change is predicted to be the most widespread human-induced disturbance on natural ecosystems, causing shifts in various biodiversity elements, including the evolutionary history of a region as a result of climate change's decline and loss of its phylogenetic diversity. This report explores the effects of climate change on amphibians' evolutionary history in the Chilean Biodiversity Hotspot by estimating the PD and PE of 27 species. In the Hotspot, we develop species distribution models to measure species range dynamics and phylodiversity. In addition, considering that Protected Areas are the primary global initiative to ensure species conservation and their features, we review PA's ability to conserve the species's evolutionary history in the Hotspot.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-022-02444-3


Do female amphibians and reptiles have greater reproductive output if they have more mates?

Abstract In general, males mate with multiple females in order to increase individual reproductive success. When the number of sires for offspring increased, we investigated whether amphibian and reptile females had higher reproductive output. According to the Subgroup meta-analyses, only female salamanders had significantly higher reproductive yield with an increased number of sires. Males are unable to coerce females into accepting spermatophores for several species of Caudata. It's unclear if females profit from mating with more than one male. Our reports, which mainly focused on amphibians and reptiles, reveal that female salamanders produced more offspring when mated with multiple males, which was not the case with reptiles. Unlike many other species in our collection, the polyandrous female salamanders fully control sperm intake and have chosen to mate multiple times.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions