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Alzheimer's Disease - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 14 April 2022

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Alzheimer disease

Memory loss is the most common symptom of Alzheimer disease. Fortuitfulness may be subtle at first, but memory loss as memory fades over time until it interferes with most aspects of daily life. A person with Alzheimer disease may get lost or confused even in familiar situations. As Alzheimer disease advances, some people with Alzheimer disease exhibit personality and behavior shifts, as well as having trouble communicating in a socially responsible manner. Alzheimer disease can be classified as early-onset or late-onset. The early-onset disease signs and symptoms appear between a person's thirties and mid-sixties, while the late-onset syndrome occurs during or after a person's mid-sixties. The early-onset disease is much less common than the late-onset disease form, accounting for less than 10% of all Alzheimer disease cases.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/alzheimer-disease


Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Amyloid deposits in the blood vessels in the brain are characterized as an abnormal accumulation of protein clumps called amyloid deposits, which cause vascular disease. People with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy have progressive cognitive decline, stroke, and other health problems that begin in mid-adulthood. Amyloid angiopathy of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy is present in several forms. Based in the countries where they were first diagnosed, several forms of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy are identified. The most common type of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy is found in the Dutch style. About half of those with one or two strokes will have recurrent seizures. People with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy with the Flemish and Italian forms of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy are vulnerable to recurrent strokes and dementia. The first sign of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy in Icelandic is usually a stroke followed by dementia. Strokes of the Icelandic variety are often earlier than those of other types, with individuals experiencing their first stroke in their twenties or thirties often in their twenties or thirties. Strokes are extremely rare in people with the Arctic type of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy in which the first sign is usually memory loss that then progresses to severe dementia. Both types of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, also known as familial British dementia and familial Danish dementia, are characterized by dementia and mobility difficulties. People of the Danish type also have clouding of the eyes and deafness, as seen by the eyes and deafness.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hereditary-cerebral-amyloid-angiopathy


Down syndrome

People with Down syndrome have a flattened appearance to the face, outside of the eyes that point upward, small ears, a short neck, and a tongue that tends to stick out of the mouth. Many people with Down syndrome have small hands and feet as well as a single crease across the palms of the hands. Individuals with Down syndrome are at a higher risk of experiencing several medical disorders. An underactive thyroid gland is present in about 15% of people with Down syndrome. Individuals with Down syndrome are also at a higher risk of hearing and vision difficulties. In addition, a small minority of children with Down syndrome have cancer of blood-forming cells. In children with Down syndrome, delayed growth and behavioral problems are common. Those people with Down syndrome can have growth issues and their speech and language develop later and more slowly than those without. In addition, speech in people with Down syndrome may be difficult to comprehend. Autism spectrum disorders (Depression of Down syndrome) affect communication and social interaction, and a small percentage of people with Down syndrome are also diagnosed with developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders. People with Down syndrome often experience a gradual decline in thinking ability as they age, often beginning around age 50. Alzheimer's disease affects only half of adults with Down syndrome. Though Alzheimer disease is usually a disorder that affects older adults, people with Down syndrome have an earlier start to this disorder, whether they were in their fifties or sixties.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/down-syndrome

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions