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Acute Kidney Injury - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 25 September 2022

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Acute kidney injury and childhood acute myeloid leukemia

Background The epidemiology information on this patient population is limited, with acute kidney disease appearing in children with acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of this report was to determine the incidence and causes of AKI in children AML during chemotherapy therapy. Methods The medical records of 112 children aged under the age of 15 years diagnosed with AML who underwent chemotherapy in a major tertiary-care referral center in southern Thailand were reviewed. Conclusions: AMI is a risk factor that causes kidney disease in children under the age of 5.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-022-05506-4


Association of early hyponatremia and the development of acute kidney injury in critically ill children

In several disease states, hyponatremia has been linked to acute kidney injury development, but hyponatremia has not been assessed as a predictor of AKI in critically ill patients or children. Following ICU admission, we did regression analysis to determine the relationship between hyponatremia at ICU admission and the establishment of new or worsening stage 2 or 3 AKI on days 2 u20133 as a result of ICU admission. According to 4. 5 percent of children with normonatremia, Severe AKI accounted for 9. 2% of children with hyponatremia in comparison to 4. 4 percent of children with normonatremia. Following covariate adjustment, hyponatremia at ICU admission was associated with a 75% rise in the risk of developing severe AKI in comparison to critically ill children with normonatremia. Hyponatremic children with severe AKI were more likely of kidney replacement therapy, AKI or acute kidney disease at hospital discharge, and hospital mortality than those without.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-022-05478-5


Delivering optimal renal replacement therapy to critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

Acute kidney disease can often make an acute illness difficult. In patients with severe AKI, renal replacement therapy is used to treat metabolic dysfunction and volume excess until kidney function returns to normalcy. RRT research has been improved by trial findings on a variety of RRT techniques, most notable the timing of RRT trials and anticoagulation for continuous therapies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-022-06851-6


Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with acute kidney injury in Japan in whom kidney biopsy was performed: a cross-sectional analysis of the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J‑RBR)

Introduction An acute kidney injury is a worldwide concern, and it can result in a poor prognosis or end-stage kidney disease. The aim of this research was to determine the characteristics of patients with AKI in whom kidney biopsy was performed using data from the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry. Based on pathological diagnosis, we obtained results for 383 patients with AKI based on clinical diagnosis for analysis 1 and 714 patients with acute interstitial nephritis or acute tubular necrosis for analysis 2. AKI patients with AKI were included in analysis 1, which was not included in the case 1 examination. In summary 2, 289 patients with AIN and 110 patients with ATN were included in the study 2. ATN patients had a higher serum creatinine level than those who had AIN patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10157-022-02236-7


Ulinastatin Alleviates Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury by Suppressing Inflammation and Apoptosis via Inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

With strong anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties, Ulinastatin is a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor isolated and purified from human urine. AKI is a form of inflammation that can cause RM-induced AKI. The aim of this study was to determine the effect and potential mechanism of UTI on RM-induced AKI. According to the different treatment regimen, the NRK-52E cells were divided into six groups in vitro. To map the mechanism of UTI in RM-AKI, Mb-stimulated NRK-52E cells were treated with UTI or si-TLR4 transfection. In vivo, UTI has greatly improved renal function and reduced inflammation response and kidney injury. UTI protected NRK-52E cells from Mb stimulation by suppressing cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, overproduction of ROS, inflammation, and apoptosis in vitro. UTI improves RM-AKI by suppressing the immune response and apoptosis by reducing the TLR4/NF-u03baB signaling pathway, according to the study. UTI has no protective effect on RM-AKI, according to our report.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10753-022-01675-4


Anticoagulation in patients with acute kidney injury undergoing kidney replacement therapy

Kidney replacement therapy is used to provide supportive treatment for critically ill patients with acute kidney disease and other non-renal indications. In this educational review, we explore the pathophysiology of the clotting cascade within an extracorporeal circuit and the use of various forms of anticoagulant agents in various pediatric KRT modalities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-021-05020-z


Medicine-Induced Acute Kidney Injury Findings from Spontaneous Reporting Systems, Sequence Symmetry Analysis and a Case–Control Study with a Focus on Medicines Used in Primary Care

The lack of a list of nephrotoxic medications that are most common in primary care, including one that compares risks across drugs is one of the barriers to effective prevention of medicine-induced kidney injury in primary care. Objectives Of this research The aim of this research was to consolidate evidence on the risks of prescription and acute kidney disease, with a focus on medications used in primary care. Method We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to find published reports of all drugs related to acute kidney injury reported from spontaneous report results. We used a sequence symmetry analysis and a case-u2013control strategy to determine the correlation between the medication and hospital admission with a primary diagnosis of acute kidney injury, as shown by spontaneous reports. Administrative claims data from the Australian Government Department of Veterans (u2019 Affairs) for the study period 2005-20132019 was used. Results We found 89 medications suspected of acute kidney disease based on spontaneous report results and a reporting odds ratio greater than 2, from Japan, France, and the United States. Spironolactone's risk estimates were 3 to more based on spontaneous reports, SSA, and case-u2013control techniques, though furosemide and trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole had risk estimates of 1. 5 or more. Positive results from SSA and spontaneous reports, but not case control, showed zoledronic acid had risk estimates above 2, while candesartan telmisartan, simvastatin, naproxen, and ibuprofen were all risk estimates in SSA between 1. 5 and 2.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40264-022-01238-4


Risk factors for severe acute kidney injury after pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation

Background and Intention After hematopoietic cell transplantation, acute kidney injury is common, but it is also correlated with poorer outcomes. After pediatric HCT, the risk factors for AKI are not fully understood, according to the risk factors for AKI after pediatric HCT. The study aim was to identify unique risk factors for AKI in the HCT population and determine post-HCT AKI trends. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with 10% fluid overload. In multivariable analysis, the risk of severe AKI was lower among those taking a calcineurin inhibitor. In severe AKI compared to no AKI, the risk of death was elevated relative to no AKI.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-022-05731-x


Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and serum albumin are predictors of acute kidney injury in non-ventilated COVID-19 patients: a single-center prospective cohort study

Purpose Acute kidney injury among COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit is a common problem, but it is less prevalent in general internal medicine wards. In a prospective cohort of non-ventilated COVID-19 patients, we wanted to investigate AKI's prevalence, predictors of AKI, and AKI-related mortality. Methods of Study 141 COVID-19 patients were included in the study. To determine AKI and mortality predictors, multivariate logistic regression was used. Unadjusted linear mixed models outlined urinary markers' tracy markers. AKI was identified in 19. 7% of patients, with 19% of patients developing AKI. AKI's independent predictors were determined by multiple logistic regression, a higher urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and lower serum albumin. In the AKI and 8. 8% in the AKI and 8. 8% in the group without AKI, 42. 8%. Urinary protein-to-creatinine ratios were diverging, with declining figures in those without incident AKI. Conclusions We found a high risk of AKI and mortality among moderately ill, non-ventilated COVID-19 patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-022-03348-5

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions