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Acute - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 26 January 2023

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Acute Intestinal Ischaemia: the Preoperative Diagnostic Approach

Intestinal ischemia is a life-threatening disease characterized by interrupted blood supply to the intestinal tissue. Secondary intestinal ischaemia are clinically correlated to the underlying cause, e. g. However, the diagnosis of primary intestinal ischemia is often postponed due to a lack of concrete clinical evidence. However, in the acute setting, a non-arterial phase CT is often used, but the results are often inaccurate in the early stages and the pattern of findings that may indicate primary ischemia are not well understood. D-lactate is a marker of intestinal ischemia, and bacteria in the bowel lumen and translocation through a damaged bowel wall makes it a potential indicator of intestinal ischemia. In the aforementioned time period, A case-control-study of all acute admitted patients with abdominal pain in Aalborg, Denmark, was performed. The sensitivity and specificity of potiential biomarkers in a blood sample at the time of admission as a indicator of intestinal ischaemia will be investigated.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05665946


PRediction of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Acute Ischemic StrokE

In about 30% of patients with acute ischemic stroke, a elevation of cardiac troponin can be present in approximately 30% of patients. According to the investigators, approximately 25% of acute stroke patients with elevated levels of cardiac troponin have cause lesions on coronary angiogram. The primary aim of the PRAISE research is to produce a diagnostic tool that allows the detection of acute coronary syndrome in stroke patients. The PRAISE study, which includes more than 20 sites in Germany, is a multicenter research. Patients with elevated troponin levels are eligible to participate in the study.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03609385


Multi-center Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis Cohort Study (MASCC)

Ulcerative colitis is a persistent, progressive immunologically mediated disease that affects nearly 1 million Americans. About one-third of patients with UC will require hospitalization for acute disease, often within the first year after diagnosis. Advances in medicine for UC have revolutionized healthcare for the University of California, increasing the possibility of remission and minimizing the need for colectomy for refractory disease. However, amid general progress, investigators have not observed a parallel temporal rise in disease outcomes among those with the most chronic disease. Providers must'personalize' care for UCLA patients by predicting whether patients will obtain ASUC or fail medical therapy, and they will be able to benefit from early surgery, minimizing morbidity. About a quarter of patients with ASUC will be resistant to intravenous steroids, the primary treatment for initial diagnosis of this disorder. In two random controlled trials, Infliximab and cyclosporine, the two most commonly used medical rescue drugs in this group, have similar short- and long-term success. Among the latter, those with chronic disease may have an elevated incidence of infliximab, resulting in a lack of effectiveness. Colectomy rates in this case were reduced short-term but not long-term, according to a small single center retrospective review of only 50 patients in which 15 patients under rapid induction, but not long-term. Investigators will design a large multi-center cohort of patients with ASUC who have homogeneously collected extensive longitudinal laboratory and laboratory data.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03669822


Pathophysiology of Acute Pain in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

Episodic pain is the most common acute morbidity and the most common cause of hospitalization in patients with sickle cell disease. Factors that contribute to the acute sickle pain include the emergence of cell-free DNA and heme, as well as a thrombosis downstream of events involving inflammation and thrombosis, as well as an ischemia-reperfusion injury. Cell-free DNA has been found in healthy tissue plasma but not in diseases and conditions that are characterized by increased cell death by necrosis or apoptosis. In fact, we have previously reported that cfDNA in patients with sickle cell disease soared sharply during acute painful episodes. Due to the acute rise in sickled red blood cells and hemolysis, a dramatic rise in plasma hemoglobin has also been observed during acute sickle pain. Although there have been many studies into cytokines and chemokines in steady state and acute sickle cell disease, there has been no comprehensive review of how the inflammatory markers correlate with quantitative measurements and type of cfDNA. We would like to analyze cfDNA from patients with SCD in stable state, as well as in painful situations to derive insights into tissue damage. In addition, we would also like to see if there is a distinct cell-free DNA and inflammatory signature in SCD in steady-state and during severe vaping crises. Overall, this report provides the opportunity to identify new biomarkers of the sickle cell pain epidemic as well as predict disease severity and prognosis.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03049475


Reliability of Pupil Response to Acute Pain

Compared to individuals homozygous for val at the Valencia158met site of the catecholamine-O-methyltransferase gene, students with less pronounced pupil responses to noxious stimuli and lower CPM will have shorter CPM.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02628314

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions