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Acquired Aplastic Anemia - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 28 March 2022

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Etiological Factors for Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Patients admitted to Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar

Aplastic anemia is a rare yet serious disease. More than 80% of anemia cases are idiopathic, according to the author. One hundred patients with acquired aplastic anemia were investigated. Patients above the age of 11 and under 65 years are susceptible to pancytopenia and empty bone marrow or marrow replacement by fatty cells. Patients with pancytopenia due to bone marrow infiltration with abnormal cells or fibrosis were excluded from the study. In this study, one hundred patients with 72% male and 28 percent female were included, as well as 28 percent female. Patients in the majority of the patients were in the age range of 11 to 45 years. There was no etiological reason for aplastic anemia in 48 percent of patients. Anemia of three patients was megaloblastic anemia. Conclusion: Acquired aplastic anemia is more common in young males.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/b0af587162ca4ed09ad5604d81946d00


Acquired aplastic anemia associated with trisomy eight converting into acute myeloid leukemia

Aplastic anemia is now recognized as a clonal disorder resulting from a defective hematopoietic stem cell growing from a generalized insult to bone marrow. After being in remission for four years, we present a case of acquired AA in a 60-year-old male with pancytopenia and hypoplastic marrow treated with antithymocyte globulin, converting into myelodysplastic syndrome and subsequent acute promyelocystic leukemia.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-2727.208259


Acquired Aplastic Anemia After Nosocomial Serratia marcescens Bone Marrow Infection in an Elderly Patient

During treatment for peptic ulcer, bacteremia, pneumonia, and respiratory failure, a 76-year-old female patient with a multi medical history experienced refractory pancytopenia. The pancytopenia improved gradually with appropriate antibiotic therapy, and identical Serratia marcescens cultures were isolated from the central venous catheter tip and bone marrow. This case shows that nosocomial S. marcescens infection can result in potentially lethal acquired aplastic anemia.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijge.2011.12.002


Anemia aplásica adquirida e anemia de Fanconi - Diretrizes Brasileiras em Transplante de Células-Tronco Hematopoéticas Acquired aplastic anemia and Fanconi anemia - Brazilian Guidelines in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Embe na tradicioneiro es aprovadas de na I Reunio de Diretrizes Brasileiras realizada no Rio de Janeiro de 2009, dias 19 e 21 de julho de 2009 As diretrizes, diretrizes neste trabalho foram elaboradas e aprovadas na I Representadas neste e de e de e dias e nas e es e es e es e tes es tes e Objetiva-se nortear no contexto do transplante e indicar formas de conscriptiono definitivo dos pacientes, definiria o nmero de transfusos, como o nmero de transfuso de minimizar a rejeiço primária e secundária, etear, com tear e dos e tera dos dose de o e tera e tera dos o dos o dos como dos e dos e o e dos In the I Meeting of Brazilian Guidelines in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Rio de Janeiro, July 19-21, 2009, the guidelines in this article were developed and approved. Transplantation is the only curative treatment for the aplastic bone marrow component of the disease, although it is insignificant for other organs of the syndrome, it does not include patience and agility in finding a donor with important findings.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/53b51a1f11214c239aaa860e2a9e18d1


Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia

When the bone marrow does not have sufficient supply of all three lineages of blood cells, which are essential for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis, Aplastic anemia arises. In the vast majority of cases, the etiology of acquired AA is elusive, but it does require exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells, which are typically present in the bone marrow and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. Interferon gamma has been linked to AA and type I IFNs, and viral infection has been shown to cause bone marrow aplasia in bone marrow. New evidence reveals that IFN also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, prompting new concerns about how IFN impacts HSC function in AA. HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyI:C and leading to BM aplasia as a result of viral infection may be enhanced by IFN/.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2016.00330


Fatal Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation in an Acquired Aplastic Anemia Patient Treated with Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin and Cyclosporine A

In a nontransplant environment, Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder after immunosuppressive therapy for aplastic anemia is extremely unusual, and has not been well characterized. This article details a severe AA patient in whom lethal EBV-LPD occurred after being treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulins and cyclosporine A. Atypical lymphocytes emerged in peripheral blood one month after the start of ATG, persistent fever that was not responsive to antibiotics or antifungal agents was not responsive to antibiotics or antifungal antibodies was prevalent, with persistent fever that was not responsive to antibiotics or antifungal agents. Blood cultures of repeating blood cultures were detrimental. An extremely high prevalence of EBV virus in his peripheral blood plasma was found by a quantitative real-time PCR assay.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/926874


Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in children with acquired aplastic anemia: a multicentre study.

In addition, the reaction rate to IST did not differ between the patients who were GPI-positive at diagnosis and later developed GPI-negative populations and the 11 patients who were GPI-positive at diagnosis and later became GPI-positive. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria secondary to AA was thought to be present in two patients with a GPI-negative population > 10% and laboratory signs of hemoglobinuria without hemoglobinuria, according to a single thrombotic event. There was no significant association between LDH measurements and GPI-negative population size, excepting the 2 patients with a GPI-negative population greater than 10%. In this research, laboratory tests of hemolysis were sufficient to diagnose PNH in AA patients. As occasionally as the emergence of a GPI-negative population at cyclosporine tapering or AA relapse was confirmed, a potential role of GPI-negative population monitoring during IST modulation may need further investigation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0101948


Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia and the Role of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

Bone marrow hypocellularity is characterized by bone marrow hypocellularity, resulting in peripheral cytopenias. The crosstalk between Bone marrow's stem and progenitor cells are highly regulated by the crosstalk with the surrounding microenvironment and its components, such as mesenchymal stromal cells, which are also altered in AA. Here we review the existing literature on BM microenvironmental changes in acquired AA and discuss their importance for the pathogenesis and therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2018.00587


Comparison of porcine ALG and rabbit ATG on outcomes of HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with acquired aplastic anemia

Abstract Objective The aim of this review is to determine the efficacy and safety of P-ALG and R-ATG in the conditioning program for patients with aplastic anemia who underwent HLA-matched stem cell transplantation. Methods A retrospective analysis of 91 patients with acquired aplastic anemia who underwent haplo-HSCT at our hospital between January 2014 and December 2020 was retrospectively reviewed. The P-ALG group held eight patients, while sixty-three patients were in the R-ATG group. P-ALG and R-ATG groups' median times were 11 versus 13 days for myeloid engraftment and 12. 5 versus 15 days for platelet engraftment. Nevertheless, the incidence of cytomegalovirus infection and Epstein-Barr virus infection in the P-ALG group was significantly lower than in the P-ALG group. P-ALG's results and safety were similar to R-ATG in the context of haplo-HSCT for patients with acquired aplastic anemia patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12935-021-02410-z

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions