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Acid Lactic Fermentation - Crossref

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Last Updated: 16 November 2022

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Fermentation weight loss, fermentation quality, and bacterial community of ensiling of sweet sorghum with lactic acid bacteria at different silo densities

Sweet sorghum is a common forage in arid and semi-arid climatic zones. This study was designed to determine the fermentation weight loss, fermentation quality, and bacterial community of ensiling sweet sorghum with lactic acid bacteria LAB; at different silo densities. In fresh forage, there was a total abundance of Lactiplantibacillus and Lentilactobacillus. In the silage in densities of 700 and 750 kg/m 3, the increasing number of Lentilactobacillus in each silo density and reduced Lactiplantibacillus was present, as well as reduced Lactiplantibacillus abundance and reduced Lentilactobacillus abundance, as well as reduced Lactiplantibacillus abundance and decreased Lentilactobacillus abundance in increasing silo densities Overall, sweet sorghum silage provided good fermentation quality, with a density of no 650 kg/m 3 and reduced FWL. The primary factor that affected the bacterial community of sweet sorghum silage was the inoculating LAB.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2022.1013913


Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria Inoculants and Stage-Increased Storage Temperature on Silage Fermentation of Oat on the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau

This research was designed to investigate the effects of lactic acid bacteria inoculants and stage-increased temperature on oat silage's fermentation characteristics and chemical composition on the Qinghai tibet Plateau. Treatment with I raised the water-soluble carbohydrate and lactic acid contents in comparison to S, also decreasing the ammonia-N ratio of the total N and final pH values. This study found that increasing the storage temperature in stages with a warming infrastructure helps with the preservation of oat silage in cold regions, as well as the inoculation of lactic acid bacteria on the Qinghai Tatra.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8110631


Evaluation of the Volatile Composition and Sensory Behavior of Habanero Pepper during Lactic Acid Fermentation by L. plantarum

The Habanero pepper is renowned for its unique aroma and flavor. Two strains of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum demonstrated their volatile composition as well as diverse physiological characteristics, such as preference and emotion related to Habanero pepper fermentation by two strains of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum. With a 72-hour fermentation, the industrial strain produced the highest concentration of 1-hexanol and cis-3-hexenoate.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223618


Effect of Homo-Fermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria Inoculants on Fermentation Characteristics and Bacterial and Fungal Communities in Alfalfa Silage

At two dry matter contents of 38 and 48 percent DM, we investigated the effects of a homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria inoculant on alfalfa ensiled's fermentation and microbial communities. When applied to medium DM silage, a lower pH decrease and, in general, higher lactic acid and lower acetic acid were present. In medium DM control silages, the prevalence of Prevotellaceae-UCG-001 was lower than in high DM control silages.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8110621


Microbial community and fermentation characteristic of whole-crop wheat silage treated by lactic acid bacteria and Artemisia argyi during ensiling and aerobic exposure

Whole-crop wheat silage is an excellent feed supplement for ruminants. Compared to Lactiplantibacillus buchneri, the primary aim of this review was to determine how increasing amounts of Artemisia argyi affected fermentation quality, microbial composition, and mycotoxin production in whole-crop wheat at dough stage silage. In silage treated with 20% AA, an apparent rise in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was found in silages treated with LB and 20% AA, respectively, and an apparent rise in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was found in silage treated with 20% AA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2022.1004495


Lactic Acid Production by Fermentation of Biomass: Recent Achievements and Perspectives

The demand for lactic acid to produce polylactic acid has rapidly grown in response to global plastic pollution caused by plastics, especially marine plastics. The current lactic acid fermentation trend in recent years has been analyzed by a bibliometric survey, and the most recent progress in lactic acid fermentation using various biomass sources and microorganisms is summarized in this report.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/su142114434


Clay-Catalyzed Ozonation of Hydrotalcite-Extracted Lactic Acid Potential Application for Preventing Milk Fermentation Inhibition

Through lactate adsorption of simulated lactate extracts, an extraordinary route for minimizing the inhibitory action of lactic acid on milk fermentation was established. During LA ozonation, pH, Zeta potential, and catalyst particle size changes were found to greatly influence LA's, LA, and catalystu2013catalyst interactions. Natural clay minerals can function both as adsorbents for LA extract from ferment broths and as catalysts for adsorbent regeneration. This study found that natural clay minerals can act as both adsorbents and catalysts for adsorbent regeneration.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27196502


Recycling of Citric Acid Waste for Potential Use as Animal Feed through Fermentation with Lactic Acid Bacteria and a Mixture of Fibrolytic Enzymes

The purpose of the present study was to ferment citric acid by-product by inoculation with lactic acid bacteria and a fibrolytic enzyme mixture for quality enhancement and crude fiber reduction in the waste materials. Casei TH14 at 0. 05 DM, CAP-inoculated enzymes at 0. 05 percent DM, DM-inoculated enzymes at 0. 0 percent DM, CAP-inoculated enzymes at 0. 05 percent DM, 0. 01% DM, CAP-inoculated enzymes at 0. 05 percent DM, 0. 1 DM, 0. 05 DM, CAP-inoculated enzymes at 0. 05 percent DM, TH14 at TH14 at DM, TH14 at DM, TH14 at DM, & DM, TH14 at DM, a, DM, & DM, L. DM, thr, DM, & DM, throkulated enzymes at DM, throkulated enzymes at The results of the chemical composition of the CAP before and after ensilage inoculated with L. casei TH14 showed no changes in crude protein, ether extract, ash, or gross energy, but the enzymes significantly reduced crude fiber and increased nitrogen-free extract, according to the authors. The combination of acid detergent fiber fibers decreased from 21. 9 percent to 22. 6 percent, and of acid detergent fiber from 13. 8 percent to 16. 19%, and of acid detergent fiber from 13. 7 percent to 16. 19 percent, respectively, was particularly effective at enhancing CAP's characteristics. Moreover, the combination of L. casei TH14 and the enzyme increased crude protein from 1. 7 percent to 2. 24% at 28 days of ensiling. TH14 did not change in chemical composition, however crude fiber, NDF, and ADF decreased when CAP was irriated with enzyme, according to CAP-inoculated L. casei TH14. The combination of L. casei TH14 and the enzyme is more efficient at improving chemical composition, reducing crude fiber, and increasing carbohydrate breakdown in the CAP.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12213049


New efficient meta-fermentation process for lactic acid production from municipal solid waste

Abstract Background The global market for lactic acid is seeing growth due to the increasing use of lactic acid for manufacturing polylactic acid. Indeed, the lactic acid industry is expected to hit 9. 8 billion U. S. dollars by 2025. Since it has lower susceptibility to contamination, no need for sterilization of culture media, or lower raw material prices, the new concept of meta-fermentation has been touted in recent years as an alternative to fermentation with pure cultures. Conclusions A LAB-rich inoculum was created with LAB isolate from the digestate and grown in the laboratory with MRS medium, resulting in a LAB-rich inoculum. Under all feeding programs used, the amount of lactic acid produced was higher than the volatile fatty acids. Conclusions The operating conditions that aided in the creation of lactic acid from mixed cultures were 55°C, 2 days HRT, and pH 4. 8u20135. 7, with pH adjustment once a day.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12934-022-01960-9


Effect of lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and their mixture on the chemical composition, fermentation quality, and bacterial community of cellulase-treated Pennisetum sinese silage

During biological pretreatment, the present research investigated the effects of Lentilactobacillus buchneri, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a mixture of both of the two species on cellulase-treated Pennisetum sinese. During anaerobic storage, an Inoculation with L impeded Weissella cibaria's growth. In comparison, however, inoculation with LY increased the relative abundance of the homofermentative bacterium Lactiplantibacillus plantarum by 6. 0 percent. During an aerobic storage of P. sinese, inoculating S. cerevisiae minimized the adverse effects of L. buchneri-stimulated fermentation on cellulose degradation, improving the bacterial community.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2022.1047072

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions