Advanced searches left 3/3

Acetaminophen Pain - Europe PMC

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 06 November 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Comparison between the Effects of Acetaminophen, Dexmedetomidine, and Normal Saline Infusion on Pain Severity after Cataract Surgery.

Background: Cataract surgery is one of the most common eye surgeries and is currently performed under topical anesthesia using sedative drugs. Both Dexmedetomidine and Acetaminophen infusion and normal saline alone are good candidates for analgesia in other situations, but this research sought to determine the effect of dexmedetomidine or acetaminophen infusion and normal saline alone on cataract surgery pain severity. Following surgery, pain intensity and drug side effects were also noted. Patients receiving dexmedetomidine had a higher risk of respiratory depression, according to their findings. Both heart rate and oxygen saturation percentage had no significant differences in the three groups, as well as pain severity. Conclusions Acetaminophene was as safe as dexmedetomidine with reduced side effects and higher surgeons' delight, with no interaction with cardiovascular or respiratory measurements. Acetaminophen infusion should be considered a safe analgesic agent for cataract surgery.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36325174


A Randomized Study of Intravenous Hydromorphone Versus Intravenous Acetaminophen for Older Adult Patients with Acute Severe Pain.

Objectives of study We conducted a randomized study to compare the safety and adverse event profile of 1,000 mg of intravenous acetaminophen to that of 0. 5 mg of intravenous hydromorphone among patients aged 65 years or more with acute pain of severe severity that was high enough to warrant intravenous opioids. In both groups, the mean baseline pain score was 10 in both groups. Patients taking acetaminophen rose by 3. 6 percent on the 0 to ten pain scale, while hydromorphone patients rose by 4. 6 percent within 60 minutes. For 37 of 81 patients taking acetaminophen and 31 of 81 patients taking hydromorphone were required, additional analgesic drugs were needed. Conclusion Although 0. 5 mg of intravenous acetaminophen administered in older patients with acute pain in the ED, this difference was not clinically significant.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35965162

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

Source Recommendations

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions