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Accessory Nerve - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 November 2022

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Transfer of the anterior C3 levator scapulae motor nerve branch for spinal accessory nerve injury: illustrative case

paraphrasedoutput:BACKGROUND BACKGROUND The spinal accessory nerve injury has resulted in the loss of motor function of the trapezius muscle and resulting in severe shoulder pains. OBSERVATIONS IN the omotrapezoid triangle of the neck, the authors present a report on Acc reconstruction 5 months after the neck fracture caused by the anterior C3 levator scapulae motor nerve branch transfer in the anterior omotrapezoid triangle.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/case21609


Spinal accessory nerve to triceps muscle transfer using long autologous nerve grafts for recovery of elbow extension in traumatic brachial plexus injuries

The aim of this research was to determine the incidence and quality of recovered elbow extension in patients with brachial plexus injuries who underwent spinal accessory nerve transfer from the motor nerve branch of the cramme to the long head of the triceps muscle with an intervening autologous nerve graft, as well as patient and injury factors that influence functional triceps results. Following the brachial plexus injury, all patients underwent the transfer of the spinal accessory nerve from the motor branch of the radial nerve to the long tail of the triceps muscle at the end of the triceps muscle. CONCLUSIONS Despite the fact that elbow extension takes longer than normal nerve transplantation, transfer of the spinal accessory nerve branch to the triceps muscle with an interposition nerve graft is a viable option for restoring elbow length.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.6.jns17290


Angiographically occult vascular malformation of the intracranial accessory nerve: case report

The supratentorial brain parenchyma is the most likely site of angiographically occult cerebral malformations. There have been no reports on AOVMs involving the intracranial portion of the spinal accessory nerve nerve. A 46-year-old female patient presented with a history of episodic frontal headaches and episodes of vomiting and dizziness, as well as gait instability six months before evaluation. The authors recommend including immunohistochemistry with primary antibody as a component of histopathology research for any AOVM found within the cerebellomedullary cistern or one suspected of attacking a cranial nerve.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.6.jns131105


Functional anatomy of the accessory nerve studied through intraoperative electrophysiological mapping

OBJECTIVE The 11th cranial nerve is described as having both a cranial and a spinal root, the former arising from the spinal cord's upper segments of the spinal cord by a number of very fine rootlets. According to classical research, the cranial root gives motor innervation to the vocal cords, whereas the spinal root gives the sternocleidomastoid muscle and upper portions of the trapezius muscle motor innervation. The main trunk of CN XI, the plant's roots, and, where appropriate, the fine cervical rootlets were stimulated at predetermined locations, from the jugular foramen to the lowest cervical level revealed. RESULTS In all cases, monitoring and stimulation of the spinal root were successful, but in only 19 cases, this was only feasible in 19 cases. In 84. 2%, stimulation of the cranial root was sufficient to cause a vocal cord response; absence of response was thought to have a scientific origin. At C-1, the SCM-S said 98% of the time; at C-2 the SCM-C responded 90. 0% of the time; and below that level only the TZ-M replied 66. 6 percent of the time; at C-2 the SCM-S responded 90. 0% of the time; and at C-2 the SCM-C responded 98% of the time; and below that level only the TZ-M replied 66. 6 percent of the time; and at C-2 the TZ-M replied TZ-Med The cranial root contributes to the vocal cord innervation, independent of the spinal cords' origins, making it a particular entity. With a cranio-caudal motor group of its cervical rootlets, the spinal root innervates the SCM and TZ.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.11.jns15817


A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures

ObjECTIVE The accessory nerve is often repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve supply is often insufficient or marginal for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer, which necessitates an interpositional graft. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were discovered medial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the anatomy of the accessory nerve fibers within the SCM were documented. However, after cutting the C-3 connections, the accessory nerve was u201cdetethered from within the SCM and after transection, the accessory nerve length increased from 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.10.jns161106


Reconstruction of the spinal accessory nerve with selective fascicular nerve transfer of the upper trunk

OBJECTIVE ANSWER ANSWER: Spinal accessory nerve palsy is often attributed to iatrogenic injury after neck surgery in the posterior triangle of the neck. The authors describe a distal nerve transfer in the upper trunk linking to axillary nerve function for reinnervation of the trapezius muscle. METHODS Five cases have been submitted in which accessory nerve lesions were reconstructed using selective fascicular nerve transfers from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. After nerve reconstruction, the mean active range of motion in shoulder abduction increased from 55 0feb0 to 151u00b0 before, to 151u00b0 after nerve reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS Restoring spinal accessory nerve function related to axillary nerve function from the brachial plexus' upper trunk is a convenient and convenient option for patients with chronic inflammatory palsy or acute idiopathic palsy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.12.spine18498


Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus

OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure that can be used to reestablish shoulder mobility in patients with complete brachial plexus palsy. METHODS Over an 11-year span, 257 patients with complete brachial plexus palsy were operated on in the authors' department by a single surgeon, with the spinal cord nerve attached to the suprascapular nerve. The spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via surgical incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the trapezius muscle's anterior border. In 17 of these patients, clavicle fractures or displacement, scapular fractures, or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was discovered and elbow flexion was reconstructed by root grafting, root graft, and phrenic nerve transfer, or third, fourth, and fifth interfrenic nerve transplant, or third, fourth, and fifth inter-nal nerve transfer. In patients who recovered at least 300% of abduction, and the restoration of elbow flexion to at least an M3 level of endurance accelerated the range of abduction by an average of 13u00b0. CONCLUSIONS In total palsies of the brachial plexus, using the spinal accessory nerve for transfer to the suprascapular nerve is safe and provides some relief of abduction for the overwhelming majority of patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.8.spine15434


Surgical outcomes of 156 spinal accessory nerve injuries caused by lymph node biopsy procedures

Following iatrogenic injury during lymph node biopsy procedures, the authors examine the surgical methods and surgical results of 156 surgical reconstructions of the SAN in this review. METHODS This retrospective review examines the authors' u2019 medical and surgical experience with 156 patients with SAN injury between 1980 and 2012. RESULTS Of the 123 patients who underwent graft or suture repair, 107 patients converted to Grade 3 functionality or higher using the Louisiana State University Health Science Center grading system, which included a human receptor. When the nerve was discovered in continuity with documented nerve activity potential across the lesion, neurolysis was performed in 29 patients. Patients treated by neurolysis with positive NAP results, including positive NAP data, were referred to LSUHSC Grade 3 or higher by more than 85%. Surgeons in Zone I of the PCT should be aware of the potential danger to the SAN, especially the SAN.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2014.12.spine14968


Nerve fascicle transfer using a part of the C-7 nerve for spinal accessory nerve injury

OBJECTIVE Spinal accessory nerve injury results in a sequence of shoulder pains and chronic pain in a string of shoulder imbalances and chronic pain. Here, the researchers describe a modified nerve transfer procedure in which they use a nerve fascicle from the posterior division of the ipsilateral C-7 nerve to repair a SAN injury. Both ends of the donor fascicle's and the medial border of the trapezius muscle were measured, from artificial bifurcation to the point of the posterior cord development in the PD. The authors then performed NFT operations in two patients, one with an injury at the proximal SAN and another with an accident at the distal SAN. A neck cyst resection, reinnervation, and complex repetitive discharges were among the patients in whom a distal SAN injury caused by a neck cyst resection, repair, and complicated repetitive discharges were observed 1 year after surgery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.8.spine17582


Dual spinal accessory nerve: caution during neck dissection

Preserving the spinal accessory nerve is a critical step in the modern-day neck dissection to reduce postoperative morbidity in patients. We discuss a case of dual SAN in a patient undergoing selective neck dissection for oral squamous cell carcinoma. To prevent tension neuropraxia and long-term shoulder pain, the SAN should be exposed to minimal traction during neck dissection.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-235487

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* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions