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Accessory Muscle - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 November 2022

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Spinal accessory nerve to triceps muscle transfer using long autologous nerve grafts for recovery of elbow extension in traumatic brachial plexus injuries

The aim of this investigation was to determine the prevalence and quality of recovered elbow extension in patients with brachial plexus injuries who underwent spinal cord transfer from the spinal nerve to the long head of the triceps muscle with an intervening autologous nerve graft, as well as patient and injury factors that influence functional triceps results. Following the brachial plexus injury, the spinal accessory nerve from the motor nerve branch of the radial nerve to the long head of the triceps muscle was transferred by all patients as part of their recovery program. Despite the fact that elbow extension is extended by a lengthy time was needed for reinnervation, a spinal accessory nerve branch from the radial nerve branch to the long head of the triceps muscle with an interposition nerve graft is a viable option for recovery of elbow extension.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.6.jns17290


804 Accessory Extensor Digitorum Brevis Manus Muscle Presenting as a Painful Dorsal Hand Swelling - a Case Report

Abstract Hand and wrist pain are common presenting problems in General Practice, Emergency Departments, and plastic surgery clinics throughout the United Kingdom. We describe the case of a 43-year-old male who initially presented to his General Practitioner with an 18-month history of progressive pain and intermittent swelling to the dorsum of his right hand and wrist. An up-to-date MRI scan was done, revealing an accessory extensor digitorum brevis manus muscle at the dorsal portion of the right hand and wrist. Whilst accessory extensor muscles in the hand are not unheard-of, variant EDBM muscles account for just 1% of these, and only a handful have been documented in literature, even though they are not unheard-of. A differential should be ruled a difference between patients and those with a painful swelling in the dorsum of the hand or wrist, which is exacerbated by repetitive use.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjs/znac269.159


Breathing pattern, accessory respiratory muscles work, and gas exchange evaluation for prediction of NIV failure in moderate-to-severe COVID-19-associated ARDS after deterioration of respiratory failure outside ICU: the COVID-NIV observational study

Patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 ARDs were recruited for predictors of NIV failure based on breathing pattern, gas exchange, and accessory respiratory muscles assessment. We performed ROC analysis for all significant differences between NIV achievement and failure groups in measured results. The ICU's success rate after deterioration of respiratory disease outside of ICU was 73%. Patients with the subsequent NIV failure were older at admission, more frail, a longer period of illness before ICU admission, and a higher incidence of CPAP use outside of ICU. PaO 2 /FiO 2 0. 78 AUROC 0. 78, p 2 points — ROC-analysis revealed that the following respiratory parameters after 48 hours of NIV could be used as a predictors of NIV failure in moderate-to-severe COVID-associated ARDs: PaO 2 /FiO 2 0. 78 AUROC 0. 78 p. 0. 80 points ; ROC-analysis revealed that the following respiratory profiles after 48 h of NIV Conclusion In patients who underwent moderate-to-severe COVID-19-ARDS, the likelihood of NIV survival rate was around 1/3.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12871-022-01847-7


The innervation of the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles in specimens with a high incidence of an accessory biceps head

Type II in 69%, Type II in 69%, Type III in 11%, and Type IV in 11%, with Type II in 11%, Type III in 11%, and Type III in 11%, and Type III in 19%. In some brachial plexus injuries, we hypothesize that the branch to the accessory biceps head may have been considered a donor for nerve transplant in a few brachial plexus injuries.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/17531934221080952


A novel accessory respiratory muscle in the American alligator ( Alligator mississippiensis )

Understanding animal form and function are essential to understanding the evolutionary constraints on animal form and function. The muscles that influence lung ventilation are essential to understanding the physiological constraints that influence lung ventilation. In the American alligator, we demonstrate a newly found respiratory function for the iliocostalis muscle. Interestingly, we did not detect any respiratory activity in the iliocostalis when the alligators were breathing with their body submerged in water at 18°C, resulting in a reduced breathing rate.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2019.0354

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

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* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions