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Abscess Drainage - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 November 2022

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Post-operative antibiotics for cutaneous abscess after incision and drainage: Variations in clinical practice

Acute cutaneous absces is a common surgical disorder that typically necessitates incision and drainage. In a UK university teaching hospital, we wanted to investigate the local use for post-operative antibiotics prescription for cutaneous absces. For a period of six months, retrospective statistics on emergency general surgical admissions were gathered. In this review, all patients with cutaneous absces were included. The local clinical governance department approved patient information prior to the study's launch. Co-amoxiclav was the most commonly used post-operative empirical antibiotics. U2018abscess page u2019 antibiotics u2019 U202 (P =0. 023), with a significant correlation between u2018abscess website U201 u2018[ X 2 =54. 8, P =0. 023]. Average duration of post-operative antibiotics was 7. 2 days in a survey of 103 patients. An average of 8. 4 days on antibiotics was spent by ten patients undergoing readmission. There were clinical variations in clinical practice regarding post-operative antibiotic therapy for cutaneous absces.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1099/acmi.0.000441


Medical Intervention Alone vs Surgical Drainage for Treatment of Peritonsillar Abscess: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Objective Peritonsillar absces are typical emergency visits for otolaryngologists. Medical administration alone can provide safe treatment without the risk associated with surgical drainage. For PTA therapy, we recommend a systematic review of medical therapy alone rather than surgical drainage. Study Methods The results of medically treated patients were compared to surgically treated patients, according to a research paper. Patients first treated with medical supervision alone were 5. 6 percent compared to 5. 5% in the surgical group. There was no statistically significant difference in the odds of treatment failure between interventions based on random-effects meta-analysis. When treated with medical intervention first, a subgroup analysis including pediatric-specific studies revealed similar risks of treatment failure when first treated with medical intervention. Conclusion: An overview of available studies showed no difference in the odds of treatment failure for patients with PTA administered by medical intervention alone rather than surgical intervention.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599820927328

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* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions