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Abdominal Ultrasound - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 10 December 2022

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Efficacy and safety of remimazolam for procedural sedation during ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block and rectus sheath block in patients undergoing abdominal tumor surgery: a single-center randomized controlled trial.

In order to advance and optimize remimazolam use in procedural sedation and clinical anesthesia, we've investigated the efficacy and safety of remimazolam for procedural sedation in patients undergoing abdominal tumor surgery. Patients in the remimazolam group, 50 patients in the dexmedetomidine group, and 50 patients in the midazolam group were randomly divided into three groups: 50 patients in the remimazolam group, 50 patients in the dexmedetomidine group, and 50 patients in the midazolam group were randomly divided into three groups: 50 patients in the remimazolam group were randomly divided into three groups: 50 patients in the & If the target sedation level was not reached, rescue sedatives of remimazolam 2. 5 mg/kg be intravenously administered in group R, hypoxemia, injection pain, bradycardia, and the requirement for rescue sedatives may have been monitored and recorded. The incidence of hypoxemia and injection pain in the remimazolam group was marginally higher in comparison to the control group, but no such difference was statistically significant. Remimazolam can be used safely for procedural sedation during ultrasound-guided nerve block administration in patients undergoing abdominal tumor surgery. Remimazolam is associated with improved heart rate stability and marginally higher incidences of hypoxemia and injection pain in comparison to midazolam and dexmedetomidine. The increased risk of hypogyny with remimazolam may be related to improved sufentanil opioid analgesia, and the mechanism of injection pain with remimazolam must be investigated further and clarified.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36476171


Ultrasound Assessment of Abdominal Adhesions in Neonates: Data over Dogma for Re-Operative Timing

Introduction: Neonatal abdominal reoperation is painful and can be complicated by abdominal adhesions. The NICU and hospital lengths of stay are examples of patients who could safely undergo early reoperation. Identifying patients who could safely perform early reoperation may save TPN and central line days, reduces connected infection and liver damage, and minimized hospitalization and liver injury. As an objective quantitative marker capable of determining reoperation timing, we wanted to see if ultrasound could accurately identify adhesions in neonates and determine the time and severity of adhesions in neonates. Methods: We undertook an IRB-approved study of neonates undergoing abdominal surgery. Patients were seen by a surgeon-performed U. S. about every two weeks before reoperation or discharge, according to patients. In five zones, right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant, left upper quadrant, left upper quadrant, left upper quadrant, left lower quadrant, and peri-incision were all assessed: right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant, and peri-incision were all assessed: right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant, left upper quadrant, right upper quadrant, left upper quadrant, left upper quadrant, and peri-incision were all a Conclusion: The United States can locate and severity of post-operative adhesions in neonates, potentially identifying patients who can safely recover reoperation sooner than predetermined waiting times.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR580366


Effects of human tissue acoustic properties, abdominal wall shape, and respiratory motion on ultrasound-mediated hyperthermia for targeted drug delivery to pancreatic tumors.

PanDox is a Phase-1 trial of chemotherapeutic drug delivery to pancreatic tumors using ultrasound-mediated hyperthermia to release doxorubicin from thermally sensitive liposomes. Methods Pancreas heating experiments were carried out using three patient body models. Pancreas acoustic properties were inconsistent between values reported in the literature and those determined from our human tissue research study. Results Human pancreatic tumor attenuation is 63% of the literature mean pancreatic tumor attenuation is 63%, so pancreas therapies require commensurately greater input intensity to achieve adequate hyperthermia. Abdominal wall deformation decreased peak field pressure by as much as 3. 5 dB and refracted the focal point by as much as 4. 5 mm. Conclusion The use of real time thermometry for targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer patients is vital to ensure adequate mild hyperthermia.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35853611


Factors affecting uncertain radiologic reports for pediatric abdominal ultrasound in pediatric emergency departments

Backgrounds: Abdominal pain is a common symptom for children who are presenting to the pediatric emergency department, which often requires ultrasound. Objective In this research, we investigated the factors influencing uncertain findings in pediatric abdominal ultrasound in the PED, but uncertain reports can lead to more imaging. Children younger than 18 years at the hospital between January 2017 and December 2019 were eligible for an abdominal ultrasound in the PED. Children with uncertain information were more likely to have undergone an additional CT scan and had a longer PED length of stay. Several causes are suspected of non-specific radiologic findings of abdominal U. S. in the pediatric population, according to several sources. Uncertain radiologic findings raise the chances of further CT scans. To raise the quality of care in children visiting the PED, steps to enhance the clarity of radiologic reports must be considered.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR573303


Abdominal ultrasound in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma staging: yes or no?

Purpose This is why ultrasound imaging is used to determine distant metastases in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In the result, this retrospective review of 498 patients aimed at investigating abdominal ultrasound as a staging procedure in HNSCC. Methods and methods A retrospective review of 498 head and neck cancer patients treated in our Department of Head and Neck Surgery between 2008 and 2015 was conducted. As a staging procedure, 426 patients underwent abdominal ultrasound. 19 out of 20 patients with abdominal metastases had N2/N3 cervical lymph node status, and 19 out of 20 patients with abdominal metastases had an N2/N3 cervical lymph node. The negative predictive value of abdominal ultrasound for HNSCC staging was 99. 03% in this report, while the optimistic predictive value yielded 5. 88%. Conclusion Only in patients with locally advanced lymph node-status, abdominal ultrasound can be helpful as a staging study to rule out abdominal metastasis in HNSCC patients. An abdominal ultrasound may be dissatisfied for patients on N0/N1 or N1 drugs.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36357610

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions