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AIDS HIV - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 May 2022

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Kristologi disabilitas di kalangan brother and sister living with HIV-aids (broslih)

This paper is the result of a Christology of Disability research on Jesus' role in the understanding of Jesus, according to the Brothers and Sisters of the Victory Plus Foundation, Yogyakarta, who live with HIV-AIDS. The Image of Jesus Christ was a new reflection and meaning for BROSLIH. In this paper, three main findings will be presented: First, Jesus is in sympathy with the lowly creation, through His Spirit in the lament of human suffering who prays to God in tumultuous life situations. Jesus' meaning is given to those who are marginalized by those who are excluded from society's and other social injustices. Jesus is the embodiment of the figure of Jesus who is present in BROSLIH's life and who is ashamed of parents, as shown by the figure of Jesus who is present in the souls of people who are broken and injured.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.30995/kur.v8i1.176


Impact of a Family Economic Intervention (Bridges) on Health Functioning of Adolescents Orphaned by HIV/AIDS: A 5-Year (2012–2017) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda

Students in grades 5 and 6 from 48 primary schools in Uganda were randomly assigned at the school level to one of three conditions: control, Bridges, or Bridges PLUS. Bridges and Bridges PLUS participants reported improved physical fitness, reduced depressive indicators, and improved self-concept and self-efficacy at 24 months, as compared to those in the control group. Compared to the other two study groups, Bridges participants showed lower sexual risk-taking intentions during the same time period. Bridges PLUS users saw greater savings than Bridges participants at 24 and 48 months.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2020.306044


Rumors and Realities: Making Sense of HIV/AIDS Conspiracy Narratives and Contemporary Legends

Rumor and contemporary legend theory allows for the reinterpretation of rumors as a measure of confidence between the African American public and health professionals, not as a result of ignorance or historical racism. HIV/AIDS campaigns in the African American community must investigate the sources and meanings of rumors, include rumors as a measure of trust, and address the underlying mistrust that the rumors reveal.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2014.302284


Growing Older With HIV/AIDS: New Public Health Challenges

At present, the health care system is ill-equipped to address HIV-positive older adults' unique medical and medical needs. Stigma presents challenges for those in need of services and health care, and it can also influence mental stability and treatment adherence, which can have a lot to mental stability and treatment adherence. Continued study and key policy changes may continue to improve HIV-positive elderly people's health by increasing access to treatment and care.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2012.301161


Retention in Care and Viral Suppression Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS in New York City, 2006–2010

We estimated the proportions of people living with HIV/AIDS in New York City were both in care and virally suppressed. Trends in care and viral suppression in PLWHA in NYC from 2006 to 2010 were measured by using routinely released laboratory surveillance results to determine trends in care and viral suppression in the PLWHA. However, the number of individuals with symptoms of viral suppression increased dramatically, from 44. 3% to 59. 1%. The Blacks were the least likely to have viral suppression. Age and viral suppression was found in a U-shaped association, with the 20- to 29-year-old age group having the least likely to have a suppressed viral load.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2014.302080


Housing Status, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes Among People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review

Accumulating evidence shows that HIV therapy includes individual-level interventions as well as ones that address cultural or environmental factors that influence risks and health outcomes of infection. The importance of housing status for HIV prevention and treatment has been known for some time, but a large portion of this coverage has been devoted to homeless people as a special risk group. Analyses have less often addressed community housing availability and conditions as factors determining population stability or non-affordable housing as a problem or temporary state. We chose articles if they were quantitative research published in English, French, or Spanish that included at least 1 measure of housing status as an independent variable, as an independent variable, health care, treatment adherence, or risk behavior among people with HIV in high-income countries. HIV medical care, adherence to antiretroviral medications, HIV clinical findings, other health conditions, emergency department and inpatient use, as well as sex and drug use were all explored in this research. Worst housing status was independently associated with lower outcomes in all domains, with rare exceptions accounting for a variety of individual patient and care system characteristics. Homelessness being a potentially modifiable contextual variable, according to studies that looked at the history of homelessness or volatile housing years before the outcome assessment was the least likely to get negative outcomes. According to randomized controlled trials and observational studies, there is no evidence that housing assistance has an effect on improved outcomes for formerly homeless or insufficiently housed people with HIV.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2015.302905


Housing Status, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes Among People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review

Accumulating evidence indicates that HIV-treated HIV regimens and those that focus on socioeconomic or socioeconomic factors that influence risks and health outcomes of infection are mixed. The importance of housing status for HIV prevention and care has been recognized for some time, but a large portion of this attention has been placed on homeless people as a special risk group. Analyses have less often addressed community housing availability and conditions as a factor in determining population stability or unaffordable housing as a condition or temporary state. We selected papers if they were quantitative research published in English, French, or Spanish that included at least 1 measure of housing status as an independent variable and at least 1 measure of health care, treatment adherence, or risk behavior in high-income countries. Poor housing status was independently linked to poorer outcomes in a variety of individual patient and care system characteristics, with rare exceptions within studies in all domains. The majority of studies that looked at the past of homelessness or volatile housing years before the outcome study were least likely to find negative findings, with homelessness being a potentially modifiable contextual variable. According to randomized controlled trials and observational studies, a largely based effect of housing support has improved outcomes for newly homeless or inadequately housed people with HIV. Both housing and residential environments are both feasible and promising, with the broad structural factors that perpetuate social exclusion and injustice that support social justice and injustice that are beyond the immediate reach of HIV interventions.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2015.302905a


Geography Should Not Be Destiny: Focusing HIV/AIDS Implementation Research and Programs on Microepidemics in US Neighborhoods

The HIV/AIDS epidemic has disproportionately affected African Americans and Hispanics. In the most adverse communities of the United States' urban areas, HIV prevalence and economic inequality is a result of increased HIV testing, diagnosis, and retention of care.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2013.301864


The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program in the Age of Health Care Reform

For many, the ability to discriminate on the basis of preexisting conditions is increasing health care access, but that does not mean that the Ryan White Program is no longer needed. We must increase funding for the Ryan White Initiative and increase the number of HIV care providers because of the increasing number of people living with HIV.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2014.302442


Addressing the HIV/AIDS Epidemic Among Puerto Rican People Who Inject Drugs: The Need for a Multiregion Approach

Among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs since the HIV epidemic began, high rates of HIV risk behaviors and prevalence have been identified. HIV has reduced among people who inject drugs in the United States, according to experts in HIV prevention and treatment. Injection drug use as a risk of HIV among Puerto Ricans is still overrepresented.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2014.302114

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions