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A1C - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 10 May 2022

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Level of Agreement and Correlation Between the Estimated Hemoglobin A1c Results Derived by Continuous or Conventional Glucose Monitoring Systems Compared with the Point-of-Care or Laboratory-Based Measurements: An Observational Study

Patients and their physicians are now able to monitor and continuously monitor their blood glucose levels in an effective and timely manner due to the increasing use of new technologies such as continuous glucose monitoring and point-of-care testing. This research was designed to determine the consistency of agreement between the standard laboratory measurement for HbA1c and point-of-care testing and glucose monitoring index that were intermittently scanned and estimated average glucose derived from conventional self-monitored blood glucose meters. Methods A cross-sectional research was conducted at the Diabetes Treatment Center in Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Saudi Arabia, between May and December 2020, finding 81 patients with diabetes who were using either the isCGM device or the traditional finger-pricking SMBG method. Also, for isCGM users, the GMI reports for 28 days and 90 days were obtained, while for SMBG users, eAG results for 30 days and 90 days were estimated. Both isCGM and conventional SMBG users were within the range of the 95% tolerance in both isCGM and conventional SMBG users, respectively. b. 7% and 96. 1% of the patients investigated by the Bland-Altman study showed HbA1c values in 96. 7% and 96. 1% of the patients analyzed by the POCT and the standard laboratory protocols were within the acceptable range of agreement in both isCGM and conventional SMBG users. Conclusion GMI obtained by isCGM or eAG extracted by traditional SMBG techniques, as well as the POCT-HbA1c results, showed a high degree of agreement; we recommend them as potential tools for diabetes monitoring, particularly in the case of patients with uncontrolled diabetes or intensive insulin therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13300-022-01240-0


Associations of the baseline level and change in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c with incident hypertension in non-diabetic individuals: a 3-year cohort study

Background Diabetes mellitus raises the risk of hypertension. The relationship between glycosylated hemoglobin A1c level and event hypertension remains unclear. This review looked at the relationship between the baseline level and change in the HbA1c level over three years with incident hypertension in non-diabetic individuals. Methods This community-based cohort study was done in a longitudinal research program with 2591 people aged 40 to 75 years without hypertension or diabetes at baseline. Changes in HbA1c and diastolic blood pressure were also significant in the fully developed linear regression models, with rises in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure [-coefficient, 4. 421, 1. 681]. Conclusions A higher baseline HbA1c level was not an independent risk factor for incident hypertension, but the increase in blood pressure and an elevated risk of incident hypertension in non-diabetic individuals was not an independent risk factor for event hypertension, according to the authors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13098-022-00827-8

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions