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3d Scanner - PLOS

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Last Updated: 10 May 2022

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Practical and technical aspects for the 3D scanning of lithic artefacts using micro-computed tomography techniques and laser light scanners for subsequent geometric morphometric analysis. Introducing the StyroStone protocol

Despite the increasing use of high-resolution 3D surface scanners in archaeological sciences, no virtual studies have concentrated on the 3D digitization and analysis of small lithic implements such as bladelets, microblades, and microflakes. This protocol is supplemented by a short guide on how to properly scan such artefacts using a sophisticated light scanner, as well as larger lithic artefacts are present in our sample. In addition, we calculate the accuracy of our scanning procedure using principal component analysis of 3D Procrustes shape coordinates on a sample of meshes of bladelets obtained with both micro-computed tomography and another scanning device. In the introduction chapter, a detailed study on the use of 3D geometric morphometrics in lithic analysis and other computer-based techniques is included to demonstrate the benefits of improving 3D scanning techniques and increasing the digitization of our prehistoric human history.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267163


Alternative methods for skeletal maturity estimation with the EOS scanner—Experience from 934 patients

Background: On typical EOS 2D/3D photographs with body position adjustments that can influence spinal alignment, hand-wrist bone age determination techniques aren't feasible. We wanted to find and analyze less well-known bone age assessment techniques that could be used retrospectively or without the need for additional imaging. Materials and methods: Nine bone age techniques were selected and applied retrospectively in a pilot study, followed by an analysis of EOS images of 934 4-24-year-olds. Difficulties included: regions outside of the image; assessment: in the higher steps of the hip, calcaneal, and knee technologies, low step length was linked to poor lateral knee examination and cervical assessment; and resolution: in the higher steps of the hip, calcaneal, and knee methods.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267668

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions